Once the Tamales are Gone, Spend December 25 at the Theater 

click to enlarge Christoph Waltz and Amy Adams in Tim Burton's Big Eyes - COURTESY
  • Courtesy
  • Christoph Waltz and Amy Adams in Tim Burton's Big Eyes

If going to the movies on Christmas Day is as much of a tradition in your family as huddling together on the couch to watch It's a Wonderful Life (or Gremlins!) or leaving some rum balls out for Santa (because snickerdoodles just won't cut it), San Antonio theaters should be as busy as workshops full of elves assembling the last batch of Disney Frozen playsets with five new movies debuting across town December 25. By press time (and right after Sony pulled their release of The Interview in fear of nuclear war), the Current got the chance to check out four of the films (excluding The Gambler because remakes make baby Jesus cry) to let moviegoers know which of them are naughty and which are nice.

Big Eyes

After a pair of forgettable projects in Dark Shadows and Alice in Wonderland, filmmaker Tim Burton redeems himself with his most authentic film since 1994's Ed Wood. In this likeable biopic about artist Margaret Keane (Amy Adams), best known during the 1950s for her paintings of doe-eyed children, Burton avoids oversaturating his audience with style and instead focuses on the relationship between Keane and her charming albeit compulsive husband Walter (Christoph Waltz), who convinces his better half that he should take credit for her popular paintings since people aren't interested in buying "lady art." While the screenplay tends to bow down to Waltz's larger-than-life character whenever possible, the themes of losing one's identity by giving up something that defines who they are as a human being is delivered with enough sincerity, one can forgive the narration pitfalls. Burton strays slightly from his wheelhouse, but it's a welcomed change of pace. 3 Stars

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