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Tuesday, June 9, 2020

San Antonio Zoo Welcomes Births of Cute Babies From Across the Animal Kingdom

Posted By on Tue, Jun 9, 2020 at 12:27 PM

click to enlarge The zoo's new baby tamandua hangs out on mom's back. - COURTESY OF SAN ANTONIO ZOO
  • Courtesy of San Antonio Zoo
  • The zoo's new baby tamandua hangs out on mom's back.
Once again, the San Antonio Zoo is here to brighten up our week with a major dose of cute.

On Tuesday, the zoo announced that its animals gave birth a bunch of new babies during its temporary closure. Among the new residents are amphibians, snakes, birds and even a set of lemur twins.



click to enlarge The zoo's twin black-and-white ruffed lemurs. - COURTESY OF SAN ANTONIO ZOO
  • Courtesy of San Antonio Zoo
  • The zoo's twin black-and-white ruffed lemurs.
The zoo's baby boom includes three adorable balls of fluff: a Southern Tamandua — a species of anteater native to South America — plus twin black-and-white ruffed lemurs. The Tamandua is the fourth born to parents Tammie and Lucho, and the twin lemurs, born to first-time mom Zaza, are the first black-and-white ruffed lemurs to be born at the zoo in 30 years.

click to enlarge The zoo's Hwamei chick, pictured at a few weeks old. - COURTESY OF SAN ANTONIO ZOO
  • Courtesy of San Antonio Zoo
  • The zoo's Hwamei chick, pictured at a few weeks old.
In a first for the zoo, a Hwamei chick hatched from a brightly colored turquoise egg. The Hwamei is a passerine bird, or songbird, native to eastern Asia.

Other notable births include several at-risk species: reticulated Flatwoods salamanders, a West African crowned crane chick, Henkel’s leaf-tailed geckos, the critically endangered Mexican endemic tequila splitfin and the extinct-in-the-wild La Palma pupfish.

click to enlarge The La Palma pupfish is extinct in the wild. - COURTESY OF SAN ANTONIO ZOO
  • Courtesy of San Antonio Zoo
  • The La Palma pupfish is extinct in the wild.
“As always I am very proud of our Animal Care Specialists for all their hard work, dedication, and passion they bring to zoo daily,” San Antonio Zoo President and CEO Tim Morrow said in a statement.

“These successful births are a result of the excellent care the animals receive and are key to continuing our mission of securing a future for wildlife.”

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