Texas doctors to review whether Uvalde victims could have survived if law enforcement acted sooner

The review is part of the Texas Rangers' criminal investigation into law enforcement's slow response at Robb Elementary School.

click to enlarge The review will investigate whether some of the victims could have been saved if they received EMS support within 10 minuets of the shooting, and trauma care within an hour. - Courtesy Photo / Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center
Courtesy Photo / Advanced Law Enforcement Rapid Response Training Center
The review will investigate whether some of the victims could have been saved if they received EMS support within 10 minuets of the shooting, and trauma care within an hour.
A group of Texas doctors is set to review law enforcement officers' response time during the mass shooting in Uvalde to determine whether some victims could have been saved, the Austin-American Statesman reports.

Austin’s chief medical officer, Dr. Mark Escott, confirmed to the Statesman that he and four other EMS physicians and trauma specialists are working on the review, which is expected to take three to six months.

The main question the study aims to answer is whether some victims could have survived had they received EMS aid within 10 minutes of being injured and arrived at a trauma center within an hour, the Statesman reports.

The review of autopsy reports and other records is part of a criminal investigation by the Texas Rangers into the police response time at Robb Elementary School earlier this year. Although nearly 400 law enforcement personnel surrounded the campus, they waited more than 70 minutes before engaging the gunman.

Last week, embattled Texas Department of Public Safety Chief Steve McCraw said the Texas Rangers’ criminal investigation should wrap up by the end of the year. The findings will then be turned over to prosecutors, the Statesman reports.

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