March 31, 2016 Slideshows » Arts

13 Art Exhibits Happening in San Antonio This Weekend 

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San Antonio has so much to offer when it comes to the visual arts. Here are 15 exhibits happening this weekend (Fri., April 1-Sun., April 3) you  should plan to check out.
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"Made in Germany"

Where: McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210)824-5368, mcnayart.org.
When:Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through April 24
Price:$5-$10

Organized by the McNay’s René Paul Barilleaux, “Made in Germany” highlights contemporary German works from the Rubell Family Collection. The exhibit, which features paintings, sculptures, photographs and works on paper, collects pieces from such notables as Anselm Kiefer, Katarina Fritsch and Bernd Becher.

"Modern Mexican Masterpieces in Wood"

Where:San Antonio Museum of Art, 200 W. Jones Ave., (210) 978-8100, samuseum.org
When: Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through June 26
Price: $5-$10

The new year brings new opportunities for cultural awareness/perspective via great art at the San Antonio Museum of Art. Opening on Friday and running through June 26 is a small but rich exhibit of brilliant works on wood by Nicaraguan- born Mexico City transplant Roberto de la Selva (1895-1957). The painter’s work is hallmarked by his depiction of the joy and melancholy of rural, indigenous Mexican life and by his use of wood as canvas, which serves to dampen his vibrant color palette and lend an uncanny sense of organic life to his paintings.

"Texas Draws"

Where:Southwest School of Art - Navarro Campus, 1201 Navarro St., (210) 224-1848, swschool.org
When:Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through April 24
Price:Free

The Southwest School of Art’s biannual exhibition series “Texas Draws” showcases Texas artists who “extend the traditional definition of drawing and apply both traditional and non-traditional approaches to this time-honored discipline.”

“Lapsing In & Out"

Where:Moody Learning Center, 1819 N. Main Ave., (210) 486-1346, alamo.edu
When: Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 6
Price: Free

San Antonio College showcases the work of Sal Torres, whose optical paintings of stripes and grids reference both the abstract and figurative properties of written language.

"My Royal Past: Cecil Beaton and the Art of Impersonation"

Where: McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210) 824-5368, mcnayart.org
When: Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through June 5
Price: $15-$20

Arguably best celebrated as a fashion and portrait photographer who brilliantly captured 20th-century luminaries — Queen Elizabeth, Marilyn Monroe, Truman Capote, Pablo Picasso, Coco Chanel, Mick Jagger, the list goes on — Cecil Beaton proved himself a Renaissance man during a career that encompassed everything from war photography to Oscar-winning costume and set designs. As a diarist, Beaton espoused a brutally honest voice that earned him the nickname “Malice in Wonderland,” courtesy of fellow multitasker Jean Cocteau. Deemed “one of Robert L. B. Tobin’s quirkiest gifts to the McNay,” a collection of black-and-white photographs Beaton published under the pen name Baroness von Bülop comes to light in “My Royal Past,” a spoof memoir that casts theater stars of the era (and even Beaton himself) in elaborate scenes exploring gender, identity, status and style. Also on view: “Dressed to Kill: Glam and Gore in Theatre,” an exhibition of costume drawings celebrating “stylish seductresses and fashionable fiends” of the musical stage.

"Straight from Mexico City"

Where:Ruiz-Healy Art, 201-A E. Olmos Dr., (210) 804-2219, ruizhealyart.com
When:Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through April 23
Price: Free

Having previously delivered diverse exhibitions shipped “Straight from Berlin” and “Straight from Spain,” Olmos Park’s Ruiz-Healy Art engages in an artistic exchange with Galería Karen Huber for “Straight from Mexico City.” Organized by curator and critic Octavio Avendan?o Trujillo, the group show brings together artists Eugenia Marti?nez (Mexico), Kanako Namura (Japan), Manuel Solano (Mexico) and Rafael Uriegas (Spain) to collectively question “the cultural context of our time and the history of painting itself with a critical construction of identity set forth in a pictorial practice.” As part of the exchange, Galeri?a Karen Huber will exhibit works by four artists from Ruiz-Healy’s stellar roster (Nate Cassie, Constance Lowe, Cecilia Biagini and Jesse Amado) in June.

32nd Annual Student Art Exhibition

Where:UTSA Art Gallery - Main Campus, One UTSA Circle, (210) 458-4391, art.utsa.edu
When:Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. and Wednesdays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Continues through April 15
Price:Free

In its 32nd consecutive year, the UTSA Student Art Exhibition is a juried competition with works by undergraduate and graduate students. Boasting a wide spectrum of themes and just about every medium you could imagine, from tried and true brush, pen and pencil work, to cutting-edge adventures in digital video and photography, the exhibit is a fine chance to see how university art students in San Antonio are shaping, and being shaped by, the creative process. This year’s competition will be judged by artist and Texas State University art professor Joey Fauerso.

"The Cloud of Unknowing"

Where: Southwest School of Art, 300 Augusta, (210) 224-1848, swschool.org
When: Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through April 24
Price:Free

Taken from an anonymously authored medieval text about mysticism, the exhibition’s title, "The Cloud of Unknowing," refers to the mystical symbolism of blood and water. McCollom’s works are theoretical, conceptual, and focused on notions of existential absence, often portraying a balance between the artist’s interest in what she refers to as the “unknowable space of the mind and the mystery of the physical body.” McCollom’s work has been featured in national print and digital publications, including Glasstire, Persona Literary Journal, and Les Femme Folles, a catalog of women artists in the United States. McCollom’s work was most recently featured in New American Paintings and is held internationally in private collections in Texas, Iowa, New York, the United Kingdom, and Australia.

Patterns, Bodies, and Beasts

Where: Terminal 136, 136 Blue Star Southtown, (210) 458-4391, art.utsa.edu
When: Thu., March 31, 6-9 p.m., Fri., April 1, 6-9 p.m. and Thursdays-Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through April 16
Price:Free

Terminal 136 pairs MFA thesis exhibitions by Brittany Ham and Kaela Puente. While Ham’s abstract paintings sample from pop culture and the Internet, Puente’s narrative vignettes explore the relationship between nature and culture.

"Lorem Ipsum"

Where:Artpace, 445 N. Main Ave., (210) 212-4900, artpace.org
When: Wednesdays-Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through April 24
Price: Free

The writers and graphic designers out there may groan at the sight of “Lorem Ipsum” in print, but in the case of New York-based Cordy Ryman, it’s not “dummy” text but the title of an exhibition that might have something to do with Roman philosopher Cicero. Hailed as “a champion of unabashed visual pleasure,” Ryman works with such non-traditional materials as reclaimed wood, industrial paints, scrap metal, Velcro and Gorilla Glue. One of several shows celebrating Artpace’s 21st birthday, “Lorem Ipsum” opens in tandem with San Antonio artist Chris Sauter’s “Biography Construction Site (Cakes).”
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"Corita Kent and the Language of Pop"

Where:San Antonio Museum of Art, 200 W. Jones Ave., (210) 978-8100, samuseum.org/coritakent
When:When: Wednesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Continues through May 8
Price: $5-$10

Corita Kent was a Roman Catholic nun, the beloved art director at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles and a prolific pop artist. Her works in printmaking offer multiple entry points as they fuse issues of faith and social activism. Encompassing more than 60 works by Kent, SAMA’s latest rightly places the artist alongside contemporaries like Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein.

International Artist-In-Residence Exhibition

Where:Artpace, 445 N. Main Ave., (210) 212-4900, artpace.org
When: Wednesdays-Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through May 15
Price: Free

Selected by independent Spanish curator Juan de Nieves, Daniel García Andújar (Barcelona), Adriana Corral (San Antonio) and Wu Tsang (Los Angeles) took up residency at Artpace in January as part of its revered International Artist-In-Residence program. A recent recipient of an Emerging Artist Grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation, El Paso native Corral has referenced disappearances and femicides in Juárez, Mexico, through installations incorporating rubbings of classified documents, ceramic body bag tags and earth collected along the U.S.-Mexico border. Often exploring a conceptual middle ground between real and virtual worlds, Andújar is known for interventions in urban spaces and his project Technologies To The People, an initiative that presents access to technology as a human right. Often collaborating with partner Tosh (aka boychild), Tsang has addressed queer and trans experience in the award-winning feature film WILDNESS, the 2012 Whitney Biennial installation GREEN ROOM and the ongoing project Moved by the Motion — which recently took shape in a performance inspired by Chinese revolutionary poet Qiu Jin and her relationship with calligrapher Wu Zhiying.

"Dressed to Kill: Glam and Gore in Theatre"

Where: mcnayart.org
When:Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through June 5
Price:$15-$20

Dressed to Kill explores the provocative pairing of glamour and gore in the theater. Drawing upon the McNay’s Tobin Collection of Theatre Arts, this exhibition focuses on stylish seductresses and fashionable fiends that are among the most memorable characters of the musical stage. Designs for Mozart’s Don Giovanni, Bizet’s Carmen, Puccini’s Turandot, and Elton John’s Lestat reveal one of the great strengths of the Tobin Collection: suites of costume drawings for entire productions. Early in his collecting, Robert L. B. Tobin acquired Eugene Berman’s costume sketches for the Metropolitan Opera’s production of Don Giovanni. That tradition continues today with the recent gift, from the artist, of Susan Hilferty’s costume designs for the Broadway musical Lestat, inspired by Anne Rice’s novel Interview with a Vampire. Paired with costumes borrowed from theater companies themselves, the drawings reveal connections between theater design and haute couture. Robert Perdziola suggested Carmen’s character in a series of different fashion looks—factory worker, gypsy dancer, matador’s favorite. Tazeena Firth and Timothy O’Brien costumed the legendary Chinese princess Turandot and her court with bejeweled splendor worthy of a runway show.
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"Made in Germany"

Where: McNay Art Museum, 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., (210)824-5368, mcnayart.org.
When:Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through April 24
Price:$5-$10

Organized by the McNay’s René Paul Barilleaux, “Made in Germany” highlights contemporary German works from the Rubell Family Collection. The exhibit, which features paintings, sculptures, photographs and works on paper, collects pieces from such notables as Anselm Kiefer, Katarina Fritsch and Bernd Becher.

Tags: art, exhibit, gallerie

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