April 20, 2017

18 Beautiful San Antonio Parks Every Local Needs to Visit

There are so many great parks in San Antonio that locals don't always take full advantage of. Get outside and enjoy all that the city has to offer.
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Friedrich Wilderness Park
21395 Milsa Dr.,
Located at the southern tip of the Hill Country, Friedrich Park blends rocky outcrops with flat, forested trails. Although you can’t bring your pets on this hike, you may be able to see one of the two endangered songbirds who call this 600-acre natural area home.
Photo via Instagram, baldemarguerrero_
Friedrich Wilderness Park
21395 Milsa Dr.,
Located at the southern tip of the Hill Country, Friedrich Park blends rocky outcrops with flat, forested trails. Although you can’t bring your pets on this hike, you may be able to see one of the two endangered songbirds who call this 600-acre natural area home.
Photo via Instagram, baldemarguerrero_
Pearsall Park
4700 Old Pearsall
This fenced-in park (actually the city’s first-ever dog park) is now part of the new, revamped jewel of the Southwest Side,  compete with “agility equipment” for dogs, benches and fountains.
Photo via Instagram, adriacavanaugh
Pearsall Park
4700 Old Pearsall
This fenced-in park (actually the city’s first-ever dog park) is now part of the new, revamped jewel of the Southwest Side, compete with “agility equipment” for dogs, benches and fountains.
Photo via Instagram, adriacavanaugh
Yanaguana Garden
434 S Alamo St.
Visit Yanaguana garden on a sunny day, and you’ll find friends playing ping-pong on the permanent outside tables, kids tangled in the massive playground’s web system, and families sharing popsicles under the shady trellis arches. With mosaic benches straight from Barcelona sidewalks and a hands-on water park for inventive kids, it’s hard to avoid this central San Antonio spot. 
Photo via Instagram, joerisgc
Yanaguana Garden
434 S Alamo St.
Visit Yanaguana garden on a sunny day, and you’ll find friends playing ping-pong on the permanent outside tables, kids tangled in the massive playground’s web system, and families sharing popsicles under the shady trellis arches. With mosaic benches straight from Barcelona sidewalks and a hands-on water park for inventive kids, it’s hard to avoid this central San Antonio spot.
Photo via Instagram, joerisgc
O.P. Schnabel Park
9606 Bandera Rd.
Part of the Leon Spring greenway system, Schnabel Park pairs natural, unchallenging trails with athletic fields, playgrounds, and BBQ pits, making it hard not to spend the entire day there. Come at dusk, and you’re sure to see some wildlife rustling along the path. 
Photo via Instagram, 
oldbostonproperties
O.P. Schnabel Park
9606 Bandera Rd.
Part of the Leon Spring greenway system, Schnabel Park pairs natural, unchallenging trails with athletic fields, playgrounds, and BBQ pits, making it hard not to spend the entire day there. Come at dusk, and you’re sure to see some wildlife rustling along the path.
Photo via Instagram, oldbostonproperties
Japanese Tea Gardens
3853 N St Mary’s St.
Sure, this isn’t a traditional park, but the tea gardens offer just as much outdoor splendor than the city’s other grassy spots. The tea gardens invite visitors with peaceful paths winding through calm ponds and delicate greenery. Bring a book to read over a cup of tea or under a pagoda. 
Photo via Instagram, joeynavarro
Japanese Tea Gardens
3853 N St Mary’s St.
Sure, this isn’t a traditional park, but the tea gardens offer just as much outdoor splendor than the city’s other grassy spots. The tea gardens invite visitors with peaceful paths winding through calm ponds and delicate greenery. Bring a book to read over a cup of tea or under a pagoda.
Photo via Instagram, joeynavarro
San Antonio Missions
Okay, so maybe the city’s most historic landmarks are more than just a casual “park,” but don’t let their professional facade trick you: These missions are meant for enjoying. Many of the city’s five missions are accompanied by a playground and picnic area, ideal for families looking for both a history lesson and playdate. Wander along Mission San Juan Capistrano’s ancient outer wall, or sit by the San Antonio River as Mission Concepción’s bells ring for Sunday mass.
Photo via Instagram, abigailgedwards
San Antonio Missions
Okay, so maybe the city’s most historic landmarks are more than just a casual “park,” but don’t let their professional facade trick you: These missions are meant for enjoying. Many of the city’s five missions are accompanied by a playground and picnic area, ideal for families looking for both a history lesson and playdate. Wander along Mission San Juan Capistrano’s ancient outer wall, or sit by the San Antonio River as Mission Concepción’s bells ring for Sunday mass.
Photo via Instagram, abigailgedwards
Chris Park
111 Camp St.
This small private park, created in memory of its founder’s son, opens its gates to the public from Tuesday to Sunday. While only one acre, there’s plenty of space for an afternoon picnic, sustained silent reading, or a peaceful, zen-like stroll. 
Photo via Instagram, theginger_snap
Chris Park
111 Camp St.
This small private park, created in memory of its founder’s son, opens its gates to the public from Tuesday to Sunday. While only one acre, there’s plenty of space for an afternoon picnic, sustained silent reading, or a peaceful, zen-like stroll.
Photo via Instagram, theginger_snap
Brackenridge Park
3853 N St Mary’s St.,
Built on top of a limestone quarry in the late 1800s, the 343-acre Brackenridge Park is now home to the San Antonio Zoo, a tiny train, golf course, playgrounds, gardens, fishing spots, birdwatching, and a wild variety of scenic picnic spots. Pedal along the San Antonio River (which begins just north of the park), set up an all-day picnic, or set the kids loose in the expansive playground. 
Photo via Instagram, audreymariecarr
Brackenridge Park
3853 N St Mary’s St.,
Built on top of a limestone quarry in the late 1800s, the 343-acre Brackenridge Park is now home to the San Antonio Zoo, a tiny train, golf course, playgrounds, gardens, fishing spots, birdwatching, and a wild variety of scenic picnic spots. Pedal along the San Antonio River (which begins just north of the park), set up an all-day picnic, or set the kids loose in the expansive playground.
Photo via Instagram, audreymariecarr
San Antonio Botanical Garden
555 Funston Pl.,
The botanical garden manages to fit all of Texas’ diverse ecosystems (and beyond) into a mere 33 acres. From the East Texas piney woods to Southwest deserts, visitors can take in all of the state’s wild and beautiful plant life. And it’s not just easy on the eyes. The garden’s Watersaver Trail, Herb Garden, Biblical Garden and others all offer educational opportunities for visitors of all ages. 
Photo via Instagram, xstinz
San Antonio Botanical Garden
555 Funston Pl.,
The botanical garden manages to fit all of Texas’ diverse ecosystems (and beyond) into a mere 33 acres. From the East Texas piney woods to Southwest deserts, visitors can take in all of the state’s wild and beautiful plant life. And it’s not just easy on the eyes. The garden’s Watersaver Trail, Herb Garden, Biblical Garden and others all offer educational opportunities for visitors of all ages.
Photo via Instagram, xstinz
Eisenhower Park
19399 NW Military Hwy. 
This San Antonio favorite offers the best of both trails: Paved, flat paths for an afternoon stroll and natural, rocky paths for a hiker’s workout. Go early in the morning to avoid the crowds. 
Photo via Instagram, from_the_border
Eisenhower Park
19399 NW Military Hwy.
This San Antonio favorite offers the best of both trails: Paved, flat paths for an afternoon stroll and natural, rocky paths for a hiker’s workout. Go early in the morning to avoid the crowds.
Photo via Instagram, from_the_border