July 11, 2017

30 Free San Antonio Events to Get You Through the Dog Days of Summer

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"Daydreams and Other Monsters" 
Mondays-Fridays, 12-3 p.m. and Mon., July 17, 12 p.m. Continues through Aug. 4, UTSA Art Gallery - Main Campus, One UTSA Circle
The University of Texas at San Antonio’s active and consistently excellent Art Department will present a special exhibit, beginning with a reception on June 7. The group exhibition, in something of a nod to Gabriel García Márquez’s novel Of Love and Other Demons, is entitled “Daydreams and Other Monsters,” and will feature works from four inter-generational artists, all of whom focus, in their own unique way, on “lowbrow imagery, critiques of popular culture, and conflicts with inner-self that are presented with brash colors and the unexpected.” Curated by Alana Coates, the show features internationally acclaimed artist Peter Saul, whose work is characterized by “a strong counterculture aesthetic and a wild politically incorrect figurative practice,” John Hernandez, a celebrated Texas artist who works with “lurid colors and eccentric sometimes outlandish subjects,” Megan Solis, an inventive and boundary-pushing San Antonio artist with a style that’s both saccharine and repulsive, and Louie Chavez, a young local artist who culls as much of his influence from meme culture as he does his study of artists like Saul. In many ways, this show is a unique opportunity to catch several generations of artists, the younger inspired, at least in part, by the older.
"Daydreams and Other Monsters"
Mondays-Fridays, 12-3 p.m. and Mon., July 17, 12 p.m. Continues through Aug. 4, UTSA Art Gallery - Main Campus, One UTSA Circle
The University of Texas at San Antonio’s active and consistently excellent Art Department will present a special exhibit, beginning with a reception on June 7. The group exhibition, in something of a nod to Gabriel García Márquez’s novel Of Love and Other Demons, is entitled “Daydreams and Other Monsters,” and will feature works from four inter-generational artists, all of whom focus, in their own unique way, on “lowbrow imagery, critiques of popular culture, and conflicts with inner-self that are presented with brash colors and the unexpected.” Curated by Alana Coates, the show features internationally acclaimed artist Peter Saul, whose work is characterized by “a strong counterculture aesthetic and a wild politically incorrect figurative practice,” John Hernandez, a celebrated Texas artist who works with “lurid colors and eccentric sometimes outlandish subjects,” Megan Solis, an inventive and boundary-pushing San Antonio artist with a style that’s both saccharine and repulsive, and Louie Chavez, a young local artist who culls as much of his influence from meme culture as he does his study of artists like Saul. In many ways, this show is a unique opportunity to catch several generations of artists, the younger inspired, at least in part, by the older.
"El Vuelo y Su Semilla" 
Mondays-Fridays, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Aug. 27, Mexican Cultural Institute, 600 Hemisfair Plaza Way.Born in Mexico City in 1963, globally exhibited artist Betsabeé Romero specializes in transforming everyday materials in powerful installations that comment on social, political and environmental issues. Based on their ability to attract “the greatest aesthetic attention among people of all ages and social classes,” Romero often employs cars (and car parts) as artistic elements — referencing borders, migration and natural disasters while adorning vehicles with floral, tattoo and cloud patterns or, in the case of her 2007 photograph Exodus I, half-burying a colorful caravan of Volkswagen Beetles on a hillside. As The New York Times pointed out in 2011, Romero “treats the car like a human body, and excels at dissecting its anatomy — especially the tires.” Taking rubber to unexpected heights while also emphasizing the importance of recycling, Romero has carved decorative patterns into tires (at times inking them up and using them as printmaking devices), embellished tires with inlays of gold leaf and velvet, and sculpted tires from pre-chewed gum — which stands out as another unexpected yet universal ingredient in her work. Previously exhibited at the Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington, D.C. as part of a program examining the importance of relations between the U.S. and Mexico in these troubled times, Romero’s “El Vuelo y Su Semilla” reflects on “the identity and culture that Mexican immigrants carry with them on their journey to the United States.” Bringing together an assortment of installation works, the solo exhibition opens in conjunction with our own Mexican Cultural Institute’s multimedia series A World of Migrants: A Week to Understand Migration.
"El Vuelo y Su Semilla"
Mondays-Fridays, 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Aug. 27, Mexican Cultural Institute, 600 Hemisfair Plaza Way.
Born in Mexico City in 1963, globally exhibited artist Betsabeé Romero specializes in transforming everyday materials in powerful installations that comment on social, political and environmental issues. Based on their ability to attract “the greatest aesthetic attention among people of all ages and social classes,” Romero often employs cars (and car parts) as artistic elements — referencing borders, migration and natural disasters while adorning vehicles with floral, tattoo and cloud patterns or, in the case of her 2007 photograph Exodus I, half-burying a colorful caravan of Volkswagen Beetles on a hillside. As The New York Times pointed out in 2011, Romero “treats the car like a human body, and excels at dissecting its anatomy — especially the tires.” Taking rubber to unexpected heights while also emphasizing the importance of recycling, Romero has carved decorative patterns into tires (at times inking them up and using them as printmaking devices), embellished tires with inlays of gold leaf and velvet, and sculpted tires from pre-chewed gum — which stands out as another unexpected yet universal ingredient in her work. Previously exhibited at the Mexican Cultural Institute in Washington, D.C. as part of a program examining the importance of relations between the U.S. and Mexico in these troubled times, Romero’s “El Vuelo y Su Semilla” reflects on “the identity and culture that Mexican immigrants carry with them on their journey to the United States.” Bringing together an assortment of installation works, the solo exhibition opens in conjunction with our own Mexican Cultural Institute’s multimedia series A World of Migrants: A Week to Understand Migration.
"Finding Dory"
Tue., July 11, 8:30 p.m. Travis Park, 301 E. Travis 
Slab Cinema presents a free outdoor screening of Disney's Finding Dory, a touching tale of an incredibly friendly and famously forgetful blue tang fish who suddenly experiences flashbacks of her family, lost long ago. Dory, Nemo, and Marlin head out on an adventure to find Dory's parents on the other side of the world. The journey turns into an amazing adventure as Dory meets new friends and gets re-reacquainted with old ones.
Photo via Youtube
"Finding Dory"
Tue., July 11, 8:30 p.m. Travis Park, 301 E. Travis
Slab Cinema presents a free outdoor screening of Disney's Finding Dory, a touching tale of an incredibly friendly and famously forgetful blue tang fish who suddenly experiences flashbacks of her family, lost long ago. Dory, Nemo, and Marlin head out on an adventure to find Dory's parents on the other side of the world. The journey turns into an amazing adventure as Dory meets new friends and gets re-reacquainted with old ones.
Photo via Youtube
"Interval" 
Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Sept. 2 , Ruiz-Healy Art, 201-A E. Olmos Dr.
Once a year, Ruiz-Healy Art invites a guest curator to organize a group exhibition — with the condition that several artists from the gallery’s roster are included alongside selected guest artists. Citing the success of previous shows curated by Mexico City-based Octavio Avendaño Trujillo (“Why Is the Sky Blue?”) and San Antonio’s own Jesse Amado (“Dreamers and Realists”), gallery owner and director Patricia Ruiz-Healy explained, “I like to give total freedom to the curator as far as theme, hanging of the show, and artists … I strive to keep a fresh dialogue and I love when unexpected juxtapositions occur.” Continuing in this tradition, RHA’s summer show takes shape in “Interval,” organized by artist, curator, musician and writer Hills Snyder. When reached for comment, Snyder described the exhibition as an “acknowledgment to the current chaos of the political climate as spewed by the White House and the concurrent reactionary spikes on social media.” Snyder selected six artists — Carlos Amorales, Fernando Andrade, Sarah Fox, Pedro Friedeberg, Nicola?s Leiva and James Smolleck — he felt “were offering clearings in this messy fog.” As for the title, “Interval” found its germinating seed in an installation by Los Angeles-based artist Poppy Coles (involving a time-lapse photograph of stars creating short dashes in the night sky) that explores “the action of waiting for something to happen. “Hopefully it will present scenarios that can be observed in silence and stillness,” Snyder said — “a respite from social noise.”
"Interval"
Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Sept. 2 , Ruiz-Healy Art, 201-A E. Olmos Dr.
Once a year, Ruiz-Healy Art invites a guest curator to organize a group exhibition — with the condition that several artists from the gallery’s roster are included alongside selected guest artists. Citing the success of previous shows curated by Mexico City-based Octavio Avendaño Trujillo (“Why Is the Sky Blue?”) and San Antonio’s own Jesse Amado (“Dreamers and Realists”), gallery owner and director Patricia Ruiz-Healy explained, “I like to give total freedom to the curator as far as theme, hanging of the show, and artists … I strive to keep a fresh dialogue and I love when unexpected juxtapositions occur.” Continuing in this tradition, RHA’s summer show takes shape in “Interval,” organized by artist, curator, musician and writer Hills Snyder. When reached for comment, Snyder described the exhibition as an “acknowledgment to the current chaos of the political climate as spewed by the White House and the concurrent reactionary spikes on social media.” Snyder selected six artists — Carlos Amorales, Fernando Andrade, Sarah Fox, Pedro Friedeberg, Nicola?s Leiva and James Smolleck — he felt “were offering clearings in this messy fog.” As for the title, “Interval” found its germinating seed in an installation by Los Angeles-based artist Poppy Coles (involving a time-lapse photograph of stars creating short dashes in the night sky) that explores “the action of waiting for something to happen. “Hopefully it will present scenarios that can be observed in silence and stillness,” Snyder said — “a respite from social noise.”
"MetaDada" 
Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 4, Plaza de Armas, 115 Plaza de Armas
While its title may spark images of Big Brother listening in on your phone calls and squirreling away your emoji-filled texts for safe keeping, the City of San Antonio’s Arts & Culture department’s group show “MetaDada: High Art for the POPulace” is not about metadata (literally “data about data”) but a fusion of concepts and practices associated with the Dada movement and Pop Art. While the hallmarks of Pop (appropriation, mass media imagery, repetition, loud colors) have never truly fallen out of fashion, Dada is less common in conversations about art and therefore remains somewhat misunderstood. Born in Zürich, Switzerland’s Cabaret Voltaire in the middle of World War I, Dada took cues from abstraction, cubism and expressionism and spun them into anti-war, anti-establishment messages rendered in a wide array of media (performance, visual art, poetry and graphic design among them). Subversive, surreal and intentionally bizarre, the movement positioned itself alongside the radical left, abolished logic, broke the rules and commented on the meaninglessness of life circa 1916. Drawing lines between the two creative movements, “MetaDada” showcases 11 accomplished locals (Ana Hernández-Burwell, Jason Ibarra, Michael Menchaca, Kelly O’Connor and David “Shek” Vega to name a few) working in mixed media, mural painting, collage, printmaking and points in between.
"MetaDada"
Mondays-Fridays, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 4, Plaza de Armas, 115 Plaza de Armas
While its title may spark images of Big Brother listening in on your phone calls and squirreling away your emoji-filled texts for safe keeping, the City of San Antonio’s Arts & Culture department’s group show “MetaDada: High Art for the POPulace” is not about metadata (literally “data about data”) but a fusion of concepts and practices associated with the Dada movement and Pop Art. While the hallmarks of Pop (appropriation, mass media imagery, repetition, loud colors) have never truly fallen out of fashion, Dada is less common in conversations about art and therefore remains somewhat misunderstood. Born in Zürich, Switzerland’s Cabaret Voltaire in the middle of World War I, Dada took cues from abstraction, cubism and expressionism and spun them into anti-war, anti-establishment messages rendered in a wide array of media (performance, visual art, poetry and graphic design among them). Subversive, surreal and intentionally bizarre, the movement positioned itself alongside the radical left, abolished logic, broke the rules and commented on the meaninglessness of life circa 1916. Drawing lines between the two creative movements, “MetaDada” showcases 11 accomplished locals (Ana Hernández-Burwell, Jason Ibarra, Michael Menchaca, Kelly O’Connor and David “Shek” Vega to name a few) working in mixed media, mural painting, collage, printmaking and points in between.
"#Queergrito" 
Mondays-Fridays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 31, Esperanza Peace & Justice Center, 922 San Pedro
The Esperanza Peace and Justice Center has a history of bringing together and celebrating diverse communities, be it through art, educational programs, or events. Their new “#Queergrito” exhibit is co-curated, or “queer-ated” by Penny Boyer, Gianna Rendon and Eliza Perez. The exhibit, officially titled “#Queergrito: Esperanza 3.0,” is a “call for current cultural output by LGBTQIA+ artists/cultural workers in response to current sociopolitical crises.” The exhibit will feature art in any medium, with digital media no longer than 20 minutes, and visual art no larger than 24 x 24 inches. As for the title of the exhibit, the Spanish word grito “means yell or shout or call. This yell can be one of celebration, anger, helplessness, etc.,” says Rendon. “A grito also brings up political connotations, like the Grito de Dolores. In this current political situation, we were wondering, what does a queer grito look like?” The hashtag signifies the “conversation between the artists and society, the artists and people who see the exhibit, and the artists and each other,” says Rendon. The inclusion of “Esperanza 3.0” in the title nods to the Esperanza’s 30th anniversary while looking forward to the next 30 years. “The historical portion of the exhibit, one room, is being devoted largely to enlarged headlines from Esperanza’s past 30 years of media representation of queer qulturas,” says Penelope Boyer, co-curator of the show. “Also featured is some anticipated ’80s- and ’90s-era archival digitized VHS documentation of Esperanza exhibitions.”
"#Queergrito"
Mondays-Fridays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 31, Esperanza Peace & Justice Center, 922 San Pedro
The Esperanza Peace and Justice Center has a history of bringing together and celebrating diverse communities, be it through art, educational programs, or events. Their new “#Queergrito” exhibit is co-curated, or “queer-ated” by Penny Boyer, Gianna Rendon and Eliza Perez. The exhibit, officially titled “#Queergrito: Esperanza 3.0,” is a “call for current cultural output by LGBTQIA+ artists/cultural workers in response to current sociopolitical crises.” The exhibit will feature art in any medium, with digital media no longer than 20 minutes, and visual art no larger than 24 x 24 inches. As for the title of the exhibit, the Spanish word grito “means yell or shout or call. This yell can be one of celebration, anger, helplessness, etc.,” says Rendon. “A grito also brings up political connotations, like the Grito de Dolores. In this current political situation, we were wondering, what does a queer grito look like?” The hashtag signifies the “conversation between the artists and society, the artists and people who see the exhibit, and the artists and each other,” says Rendon. The inclusion of “Esperanza 3.0” in the title nods to the Esperanza’s 30th anniversary while looking forward to the next 30 years. “The historical portion of the exhibit, one room, is being devoted largely to enlarged headlines from Esperanza’s past 30 years of media representation of queer qulturas,” says Penelope Boyer, co-curator of the show. “Also featured is some anticipated ’80s- and ’90s-era archival digitized VHS documentation of Esperanza exhibitions.”
Frida Fest 2017 
Sat., July 15, 12-9 p.m., Wonderland of the Americas, 4522 Fredericksburg
Que Retro Arts and Viva Vegeria host the second annual Frida Festival, a celebration of her life and works including over 50 artisan market vendors, an art gallery, a handmade mercado, music and performances.
Photo by Jaime Monzon
Frida Fest 2017
Sat., July 15, 12-9 p.m., Wonderland of the Americas, 4522 Fredericksburg
Que Retro Arts and Viva Vegeria host the second annual Frida Festival, a celebration of her life and works including over 50 artisan market vendors, an art gallery, a handmade mercado, music and performances.
Photo by Jaime Monzon
"Puente*Bridge" 
Wednesdays-Sundays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Aug. 13 at Cinnabar Art Gallery, 1420 South Alamo  A creative response to “a time when borders seem more like barriers,” Cinnabar’s “Puente*Bridge” marks a collaboration with San Antonio-based artist Ernesto Ibañez and his Arte International, an agency designed to connect Latin American artists with U.S. galleries and corporate buyers. Aiming to “build a bridge between the art community in Texas and Mexico,” the group show brings together works by eight artists — including Ibañez, who’s best known for animal sculptures covered with remarkably soft-looking layers rendered with thousands of nails. Beyond strong ties to the city of Guadalajara, “Puente*Bridge” finds a bit of common ground in the medium of painting — although genres and approaches vary wildly, ranging from from stylized realism (Patricia Sanchez Saiffe) and playful pop (Roberto Morleghem) to conceptual portraiture (Carlos Torres) and collage-inspired mashups (Cinthia Nuez).
"Puente*Bridge"
Wednesdays-Sundays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through Aug. 13 at Cinnabar Art Gallery, 1420 South Alamo
A creative response to “a time when borders seem more like barriers,” Cinnabar’s “Puente*Bridge” marks a collaboration with San Antonio-based artist Ernesto Ibañez and his Arte International, an agency designed to connect Latin American artists with U.S. galleries and corporate buyers. Aiming to “build a bridge between the art community in Texas and Mexico,” the group show brings together works by eight artists — including Ibañez, who’s best known for animal sculptures covered with remarkably soft-looking layers rendered with thousands of nails. Beyond strong ties to the city of Guadalajara, “Puente*Bridge” finds a bit of common ground in the medium of painting — although genres and approaches vary wildly, ranging from from stylized realism (Patricia Sanchez Saiffe) and playful pop (Roberto Morleghem) to conceptual portraiture (Carlos Torres) and collage-inspired mashups (Cinthia Nuez).
Balcones Heights Jazz Festival 
Fridays, 7:30 & 9 p.m. Continues through July 28, Wonderland of the Americas Amphitheatre, 4522 Fredericksburg Road
Friday kicks off the 24th annual Balcones Heights Jazz Festival (July 7, 14, 21 and 28), a free family-friendly event at the Wonderland of the Americas Amphitheater. In the past, the festival has hosted such internationally acclaimed artists as saxophonist Jeff Kashiwa, jazz/pop vocalist Slim Man, and fusion guitarist Peter White. David Munoz, host of Sunday Morning Jazz with Q101.9, will add another festival to his 23-year streak of emceeing the event. Bluesy Texas jazz guitarist Ruben V returns to the festival accompanied by local vocalist Melina. The festival lineup is full of newcomers, like Strunz & Farah from Costa Rica and Iran respectively, whose blended virtuosic style casts Allman Brothers-style twin leads and improvisation into flamenco rhythms. Paul Jackson, Jr., a sought-after sessions musician who’s recorded with the likes of Michael Jackson and B.B. King will also take the stage at Wonderland for the first time, along with dentist by day and saxophonist by night Phillip “Doc” Martin, precocious rising saxophonist Chase Huna, smooth jazz keyboardist Oli Silk, instrumental jazz guitarist Steve Oliver and cutting-edge jazz trumpeter Rick Braun.
Balcones Heights Jazz Festival
Fridays, 7:30 & 9 p.m. Continues through July 28, Wonderland of the Americas Amphitheatre, 4522 Fredericksburg Road
Friday kicks off the 24th annual Balcones Heights Jazz Festival (July 7, 14, 21 and 28), a free family-friendly event at the Wonderland of the Americas Amphitheater. In the past, the festival has hosted such internationally acclaimed artists as saxophonist Jeff Kashiwa, jazz/pop vocalist Slim Man, and fusion guitarist Peter White. David Munoz, host of Sunday Morning Jazz with Q101.9, will add another festival to his 23-year streak of emceeing the event. Bluesy Texas jazz guitarist Ruben V returns to the festival accompanied by local vocalist Melina. The festival lineup is full of newcomers, like Strunz & Farah from Costa Rica and Iran respectively, whose blended virtuosic style casts Allman Brothers-style twin leads and improvisation into flamenco rhythms. Paul Jackson, Jr., a sought-after sessions musician who’s recorded with the likes of Michael Jackson and B.B. King will also take the stage at Wonderland for the first time, along with dentist by day and saxophonist by night Phillip “Doc” Martin, precocious rising saxophonist Chase Huna, smooth jazz keyboardist Oli Silk, instrumental jazz guitarist Steve Oliver and cutting-edge jazz trumpeter Rick Braun.
"The Odds" & "Plural Forms" 
Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through July 16 
Abstracted fields of color, otherworldly objects and imagined narratives converge in “The Odds” and “Plural Forms” — a unique pairing of solo shows organized by the Southwest School of Art. A Mexico City-based artist who favors both experimental and scientific processes, Victor Pérez-Rul employs sculpture and installation to “explore and exploit” intersections between “energy, matter and consciousness.” For “The Odds,” Pérez-Rul fuses traditional and technological elements in a sound-equipped environment informed by “science and futuristic thought.” Born in Bishop, Texas, and based in San Antonio, UTSA alum Esteban Delgado plays with color, light and perspective in geometric paintings reminiscent of the minimalist aesthetics of Ad Reinhardt and Josef Albers. His “Plural Forms” takes shape in a series of large-scale paintings and a site specific installation referencing “tensions between various colors and forms” found within the South Texas landscape. Opening in tandem in the school’s San Antonio Express-News Photography Gallery, “Atomic Color” sees local photographer Tom Turner altering and enhancing appropriated historical footage of nuclear test explosions.
"The Odds" & "Plural Forms"
Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through July 16
Abstracted fields of color, otherworldly objects and imagined narratives converge in “The Odds” and “Plural Forms” — a unique pairing of solo shows organized by the Southwest School of Art. A Mexico City-based artist who favors both experimental and scientific processes, Victor Pérez-Rul employs sculpture and installation to “explore and exploit” intersections between “energy, matter and consciousness.” For “The Odds,” Pérez-Rul fuses traditional and technological elements in a sound-equipped environment informed by “science and futuristic thought.” Born in Bishop, Texas, and based in San Antonio, UTSA alum Esteban Delgado plays with color, light and perspective in geometric paintings reminiscent of the minimalist aesthetics of Ad Reinhardt and Josef Albers. His “Plural Forms” takes shape in a series of large-scale paintings and a site specific installation referencing “tensions between various colors and forms” found within the South Texas landscape. Opening in tandem in the school’s San Antonio Express-News Photography Gallery, “Atomic Color” sees local photographer Tom Turner altering and enhancing appropriated historical footage of nuclear test explosions.