Art Events in San Antonio

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‘Huddled Masses: Who We Are’

Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 30
Institute of Texan Cultures 801 E César Chávez Blvd, San Antonio San Antonio


While it’s nothing new within the photographic realm, the use of handwritten signage as a conceptual prop has loaned itself to diverse projects that function as distinct signs of their own times. Shot in a London alleyway as an introduction to filmmaker D. A. Pennebaker’s 1967 Bob Dylan documentary Don’t Look Back, the pioneering music video “Subterranean Homesick Blues” shows the iconic singer slinging cue cards that mirror the song’s lyrics — until they fall slightly off-beat, complete with misspelled words such as “pawking metaws” and “sucksess.” The gimmick was later appropriated in videos for Belle and Sebastian, INXS, Steve Earle and “Weird Al” Yankovic, among others. Also created in London, Turner Prize-winning British artist Gillian Wearing’s oft-referenced series “Signs That Say What You Want Them To Say and Not Signs That Say What Someone Else Wants You To Say” entailed her photographing and interviewing more than 500 strangers she encountered on the street. As its title may suggest, her “Signs” project invited participants to be captured holding signs emblazoned with personal sentiments — which run the gamut from defiantly proud (“Queer + Happy”) to sobering (“I Have Been Certified as Mildly Insane!”) to dire (“I Hate This World!”). Other notable endeavors have paralleled Wearing’s format. The Portraits from Occupy Wall Street series Martin Schoeller shot for The New Yorker in 2011, for example, featured a young female protestor’s sign declaring, “Prostitution: the Only Viable Option Available After Graduation to Afford My Student Loan Debt.” Audra Miller’s touching portraits of formerly homeless individuals for the Bay Area exhibition “Everyone Deserves a Home” showed a one subject with a sign reading, “Home Is a Haven From the Insanity of the Rest of This Incomprehensible World.” Local photographer Sarah Brooke Lyons’ well-received series “1005 Faces” even utilized such recognizable personalities as Tim Duncan (“Good, Better, Best, Never Let It Rest Until Your Good Is Better And Your Better Is Your Best!”). Begun in 2016 and completed in late 2018, San Antonio photographer Ramin Samandari’s timely body of work “Huddled Masses: Who We Are” fits in this same vein but with a specific focus on ancestry and immigration. Born in Tehran, Iran, Samandari relocated to Texas at age 17 during the Iranian Revolution, settled in the Alamo City in 1988 and became a U.S. citizen in 1990. Hearkening to his complementary portrait projects “San Antonio Faces of Art” and “Faces of Artpace,” Samandari’s latest body of work took shape through open calls and First Friday photo sessions at his Magic Realism Studio in the Blue Star Arts Complex. While all 320 individuals Samandari photographed for the series were prompted to write a brief statement about their ancestry, some participants focused on broad, universal terms like “neighbor,” “human” and “earth walker.” “This project is about the very idea of America ... a nation made up of people from everywhere, coming to her shores, some escaping famine, war, oppression and some simply looking for better opportunities,” Samandari explained in his artist’s statement. Now part of the permanent collection of the Institute of Texan Cultures, “Huddled Masses: Who We Are” comes to light at a free public reception in conjunction with the monthlong celebration of Fotoseptiembre. (210) 458-2300

Alex de Leon and Elizabeth McGrath

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 29
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


As it prepares for what promises to be a memorable 25th anniversary in 2020, Artpace is thoughtfully looking back at its infancy — a period guided by its founder, the late artist, collector and philanthropist Linda Pace. Following in the same reflective vein as the 2018 group show “Then and Now,” which brought together works by local Artpace residency alumni Ken Little, Kathy Vargas, Constance Lowe and Ángel Rodríguez Díaz, the influential institution’s latest offerings turn back the clock to celebrate the work of two somewhat unsung artists whose connections to the organization extend back to the start of its residency program. Installed in the street-level Main Space in an arrangement that’s sure to spark the curiosity of passersby, a capsule collection of pieces created by former San Antonio resident Elizabeth McGrath is anchored by Broken, a conceptual sculpture she created during her 1996 Artpace residency. Comprised of a weathered wooden chair enveloped in crocheted silk that stretches to the ceiling like a spider’s web, it’s flanked by unrelated but equally curious sculptures — an organic-looking object pieced together from found wood and Bondo putty, and a snakelike coil fashioned from what appears to be a stuffed floral bedsheet. Behaving almost as conversation prompts for anyone who happens upon them in Artpace’s Main Avenue windows, these odd experiments with materials hard and soft may suggest alternate streams of discourse when viewers learn that McGrath long ago shifted her professional focus from art to psychotherapy. Delivering a poppier, punchier counterpoint to this blast from the past, the work of late Alamo City legend Alex de León lines walls and cases upstairs in Artpace’s Hudson Showroom. Like McGrath, de León represented San Antonio as an International Artist-in-Residence in 1996 and both participated in Artpace’s London Studio Program in 1995, but the similarities seem to end there — and this pairing of exhibitions makes no pretense of connection outside of space and time. An Edinburg native who studied printmaking at Kansas City Art Institute, de León left bold marks on San Antonio from the 1980s until his passing in 2012. Although ceramics emerged as his strong suit and his signature style got pegged as folk art, he didn’t consider himself a ceramicist or a folk artist. In true pop fashion, his work often relied on the repetition of popular imagery and landed on local T-shirts and Hollywood film sets alike. Assembled from a number of local collections, his new self-titled exhibition looks and feels like a tight retrospective for a pioneer of the San Antonio aesthetic. Beyond a playful, even cheery color palette that adorns everything from expertly rendered enamel paintings on steel to functional clay vessels and covetable shot glasses, de León’s pieces are tied together with a visual vocabulary punctuated by police cars, hearses, skulls, beer cans, cigarette packs and steaks on the grill. Although the subject matter is often immediately funny, the pieces’ titles paint a clearer picture of his sharp sense of humor: the 1995 painting Surprized Anything Gets Done As Much As He Drinks depicts a mess of tools, car parts and empty beer bottles scattered around a garage; and a classic pink convertible is parked amid a storm of cigarette butts, booze bottles, martini glasses and musical instruments in the 1997 ceramic bowl She Shoulda Tooka Cab. While it may look like the odd man out, a small cardboard house perched in a corner is taken from the body of work that inspired Artpace Executive Director Riley Robinson to revisit de León’s work in a contemporary context. Taken from his 2004-era “Welcome Home Series,” the ramshackle sculpture was built from materials de León purchased from down-and-out individuals: signs emblazoned with pleas such as “Homeless and Hungry. Please Help If You Can,” “Mother of Three Struggling From Earlier Layoff. Need Help Please” and “Homeless Vet. Please Help. God Bless You. (210) 212-4900

Organic Transformations

Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Fridays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 30
Moody Learning Center 1819 N. Main Ave., San Antonio Downtown


From chipping paint on an old door to the moldering remains of the Titanic on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean, the planet consistently reminds us that our attempts to delineate humanity from the natural world are naïve at best. For Fotoseptiembre, San Antonio College faculty members are presenting a body of work themed on the mutability of the natural world — an examination of the way everything from tree bark to abandoned buildings morph over time via “Organic Transformations.” The exhibition features photos by Tricia Buchhorn, Rebecca Dietz, Joan Fabian, Russell Guerrero, Jo Hilton, Edmund Lo and Mark Magavern, collecting the artists’ varying perspectives on “evidence of the transformations found in nature, the human footprint and the striving of living organisms to co-exist on earth.” (210) 486-1346

Ethel Shipton: Listening to Berlin

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Ruiz-Healy Art 201-A E. Olmos Dr., San Antonio San Antonio


“Listening to Berlin,” Ethel Shipton’s latest show at Ruiz-Healy Art, captures the sights and sounds of Germany’s capital city. Shipton, who was selected for Blue Star Contemporary’s three month residency at Berlin’s Künstlerhaus Bethanien in 2018, draws from her trip in a series of prints, mixed-media works and interactive sculpture. A city rich in history and culture, Berlin has much to offer the traveling artist. While there, Shipton took interest in the vast graffiti culture and street art Berlin has become known for. “I started taking pictures of the graffiti, and the graffiti took me to look at other parts of the city that were interesting to me,” Shipton said in a statement. Among the highlights in this show is a sculptural piece where gallery visitors can sit and listen to the sounds of the city. Like much of Shipton’s work, “Listening to Berlin” focuses on bringing passing, everyday objects into sharp focus during moments of contemplation. In an era filled with constant distractions, Shipton’s work gives viewers permission to truly engage their surroundings. (210) 804-2219

‘What My Mother Told Me, What My Grandmother Refused to Say’

Through Sept. 27, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Semmes Gallery University of the Incarnate Word, 4301 Broadway, San Antonio San Antonio


In “What My Mother Told Me, What My Grandmother Refused to Say,” University of the Incarnate Word alumna Theresa Newsome returns to her alma mater to present an “intimate, parallel conversation regarding the conception of tradition, family history and the methodical analysis of one’s genealogical identity.” The photo series includes intimate portraits, outdoor vistas, vignettes of lived-in interior spaces and old family photographs, both posed and candid. Newsome serves as “kinkeeper” for her family, both as the self-appointed family historian — “documenting oral narratives, partaking in biological research” — and as an individual seeking to attune her personal identity with the narrative of her lineage. By juxtaposing the physical archive of antiques and other objects collected over time with portraiture, she seeks to “define the complications, inconsistencies, confusion and truth regarding heritage and personal identity.” (210) 829-6000

'And Then I Met You'

Thursdays-Saturdays, 3-7 p.m. Continues through Sept. 20
Sala Diaz 517 Stieren St, San Antonio San Antonio


Whether working in collage, animation, painting, drawing or sculpture, San Antonio artist Sarah Fox conjures bizarre dreams, fairy tales, myths and allegories. A near constant is the presence of animal-human hybrids — women and children either blessed or afflicted by squid tentacles, horse heads, beaks, wings or hooves. Femininity, including colors and materials stereotypically labeled as feminine, also informs her multimedia work, which has been shown fairly extensively on the local level (Artpace, Hello Studio, Blue Star Contemporary, Southwest School of Art, FL!GHT Gallery, the list goes on) as well as in Germany, Austria and Mexico. A New Jersey native who grew up in Houston and counts authors Joseph Campbell and Rudyard Kipling among her influences, Fox recently adopted a son. This “amazing, exhausting, life-changing event” has deeply impacted her latest body of work. Beyond inspiring her to create “serious, engaging, meaningful work about love,” motherhood has led her to investigate masculinity along with “the pressures and constraints gender norms place on little boys so early in their life.” A creative response to everything from onesies emblazoned with footballs and dinosaurs to flower-sniffing Ferdinand the Bull and Ponyboy Curtis, the sensitive “greaser” who narrates S.E. Hinton’s coming-of-age novel The Outsiders, “And Then I Met You” employs playful young centaurs as protagonists in an artful creation story that challenges tough-guy narratives. When quizzed about her affection for Aesop’s Fables and whether there are parallels to be drawn, Fox replied, “I am very interested in stories we sort of tell ourselves (as human beings) again and again and cross-culturally. … Maybe with the adoption story I was trying to tell an essential fable of love and sort of finding a home.” Summed up by the artist as “an exhibition about the nature of little boys and the men that they become,” “And Then I Met You” comprises animation, cyanotypes, a self-published children’s book, a quilt and a music box incorporating fetal heart-monitor records from her son’s birth. During the opening reception, Fox will be joined by fellow artists Brittany Ham and Hilary Rochow for a fitting complement in the form of a shadow puppet performance. (972) 900-0047

Art and the Animal Exhibition Preview Party

Thu., Sept. 19, 6-8 p.m.
Briscoe Western Art Museum 210 W. Market St., San Antonio, San Antonio San Antonio


Be among the first to see the Briscoe’s new exhibit while you mingle with artists, enjoy beer, wine, and light bites. Grab a Blue Buffalo or a Foxy Fizz - specialty cocktails created to celebrate Art and the Animal during an exclusive preview reception featuring remarks by Wes Siegrist, artist and Executive Director of SAA, at the Jack Guenther Pavilion. The event is free for Briscoe members. Complimentary valet parking included. You can call (210)-507-4864 or visit their website for more information. 210.299.4499

The Light Here Changes Everything: A Book Launch Event

Thu., Sept. 19, 7-9 p.m.
Gemini Ink 1111 Navarro, San Antonio San Antonio


Join Gemini Ink for a book launch and reception celebrating the publication of Gemini Ink Literary Programs Director Patrick Stockwell's debut book The Light Here Changes Everything. Accolades include the 2018 winner of Texas Review Press's Clay Reynolds Novella Prize. The launch will include special guest reader Florinda Flores-Brown and refreshments will be provided. (210) 734-9673

David Rogers' Big Bugs

Through Dec. 8, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
San Antonio Botanical Garden 555 Funston, San Antonio San Antonio


They’re big, really big. David Rogers’ Big Bugs stand as tall as 25 feet and have wingspans up to 17 feet wide, and they are coming to the San Antonio Botanical Garden. This gigantic exhibit opens Labor Day weekend (Aug. 31 – Sept. 1) and will be on display through Dec. 8. David Rogers’ Big Bugs is a nationally prominent touring exhibit. Visitors will see 10 larger-than-life insect sculptures, all made from natural materials, positioned throughout the 38 acres of the Botanical Garden. San Antonio Botanical Garden is a Texan by Nature Conservation Partner. Regular admission rates apply. (210) 536-1411

Charles White: Celebrating the Gordon Gift

Tuesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 1
Blanton Museum of Art 200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd, Austin Austin

Buy TicketsFree


Charles White: Celebrating the Gordon Gift features drawings, color lithographs, album covers and more. Born in 1918 in Chicago, White dedicated his life and artistic practice to creating a visual archive of the Black experience in the United States. Fighting against widely circulating racist and grotesque representations of Black people, White created images of African Americans endowed with “truth, dignity, and beauty.” The Blanton’s exhibition foregrounds White’s connection to his contemporaries and his participation in larger social and political movements in his life-long career as an artist, activist and educator. The exhibition is included in the price of admission. (512) 471-5482

Joiri Minaya: Labadee

Through Dec. 8, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.
Blanton Museum of Art 200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd, Austin Austin

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Joiri Minaya’s video Labadee explores the social and economic dynamics at play in Labadee, Haiti, on a private beach leased to Royal Caribbean cruise lines until 2050. Connecting the Caribbean tourism industry with the legacy of invasion and colonization, the video begins with passages from Christopher Columbus’s diary recounting his arrival in the New World that transition seamlessly into a description of a contemporary visit to Labadee. There, a wall separates the tourists from the locals; the only Haitians allowed on the beach are those employed by the resort or who pay a fee to sell goods or perform. 5124717324

"Bygone Texas"

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Nov. 3
Musical Bridges Around the World 23705 IH-10 West, San Antonio San Antonio


The Art Gallery at Musical Bridges Around the World is pleased to announce “Bygone Texas,” an exhibition by photographers John Mattson and Karen Zimmerly. Presented in conjunction with Fotoseptiembre USA, these sometimes humorous, sometimes wistful, yet always provocative images capture the quirky, poetic remains of abandoned spaces and towns in west Texas. Working together but photographing independently, the aesthetic visions and distinct personalities of this artist couple emerge in subtle shift of interpretation, composition and emphasis. The exhibition will open with a reception on Saturday, August 31 and will remain on view by appointment during business hours through November 3. (210) 464-1534

XIX BIiennial Art Faculty Exhibition

Tuesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. Continues through Oct. 4
UTSA Art Gallery - Main Campus One UTSA Circle, San Antonio San Antonio


Opening Reception: Wed, Sept 4, 5 - 7pm. Featuring: Ricky Armendariz, Ron Binks, Christie Blizard, Blair Bodden, James Broderick, Meredith Dean, Greg Elliott, Charles Field, Houston Fryer, Verena Gaudy, Ovidio Giberga, Buster Graybill, Sarah Lasley, Jayne Lawrence, Ken Little, Connie Lowe, Mark McCoin, Michele Monseau, Juan Mora, Andrei Renteria, Martín Rodriguez, Libby Rowe, Kent Rush, Humberto Saenz, Alan Serna, and Jason Willome. Gallery hours are Tues – Fri, 10am – 4pm, Sat 1- 4pm, and by appointment; Closed Sun/Mon. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. Metered parking is available in the Ximenes Ave Garage. (210) 458-4391

NYFA Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program Exhibition

Through Sept. 29, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.
Centro de Artes 101 S. Santa Rosa Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


An exhibition of visual art, film, and performance by the first round of participants in the New York Foundation for the Arts Immigrant Artist Mentoring Program in San Antonio. Open daily 11am-6pm with an opening reception 6-9pm Thursday, June 27, Film & Performance night 6-9pm Thursday, July 11 and Artist Panel Discussion & Cataloque Release 6-9pm Wednesday, August 7. (210) 207-1435

Teletextile: Connected

Fri., Sept. 20, 8 p.m., Sat., Sept. 21, 8 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 22, 5 p.m.
Jump-Start Theater 710 Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio Monticello

Buy Tickets$10-$20

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Jump-Start Performance Co. announces this season’s INKubator project, Teletextile: Connected, an immersive, non-narrative, music-centered production. Admission is at the audience members’ discretion to Choose-What-You-Pay: $10, $15 or $20. (210) 227-5867

Morning Mixer

Fridays, 8-10 a.m.
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


Join Artpace 8am-10am every Friday for free donuts and coffee for purchase. They will feature a rotating roster of coffee artists from around San Antonio. The galleries are open throughout Morning Mixer, so complement your morning with innovative contemporary art. (210) 212-4900

National Museum of the Pacific War Holds Annual Symposium

Sat., Sept. 21, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
University of Texas at San Antonio 1 UTSA Circle, San Antonio San Antonio


This year’s symposium, hosted by the UTSA History Department, will focus on Operational Command and Control in the Pacific Theater during World War II. It will closely examine the methods and styles chosen by four command and control centers in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of War. The day-long event will analyze the three individuals whose presence in their command and control structure was most profound. 5129716163

Comfort Art Festival

Sat., Sept. 21, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Comfort Historic District 3rd and 8th Sts, Hwy 27 and Broadway, Comfort Road Trip


A select group of Hill Country artists will demonstrate, display and sell their works, representing a variety of media from oil paintings and drawings to jewelry and textiles. Artists will greet shoppers and have displays inside and outside of retail businesses throughout the downtown historic district and at the distillery. A list of artists and their locations will be available at participating merchants. The artist line-up is subject to change. www.gnocomforttx.com

Wild West, Wildlife! Community Day

Sat., Sept. 21, 12-4 p.m.
Briscoe Western Art Museum 210 W. Market St., San Antonio, San Antonio San Antonio


Walk on the wild side of the West and enjoy Art and the Animal as it comes to life with a free community day. Meet some real wildlife with animals from San Antonio Zoo, make memorable wildlife crafts, experience hands-on demonstrations, enjoy special animal-themed story times and leave your mark on a special mural created by Wes Siegrist, Executive Director of SAA. Seigrist has created a 5’ x 10’ mural of bison in the west for visitors to help complete. The piece will then be displayed at the Briscoe during Art and the Animal. Admission to Wild West, Wildlife! is free for the entire family and includes access to the museum. (210) 2994499; (210) (FAX)

"Una Voz Desatada/A Voice Unbound" Opening Reception

Sat., Sept. 21, 5:30-8:30 p.m.
Bihl Haus Arts 2803 Fredericksburg, San Antonio San Antonio


Bihl Haus Arts (BHA) presents “Una Voz Desatada /A Voice Unbound,” an exhibition of works by Rocio Alvarado Lockwood through an opening reception. The exhibition, which runs through October 26, features Rocio’s drawings, prints and text that reveal the trauma she experienced as a child immigrant trying to survive in a new culture. (210) 383-9723

Dolly Parton Tribute Night

Sat., Sept. 21, 6-9 p.m.
Folklores Coffee House 5007 S. Flores St., San Antonio Southside

Buy Tickets$5-$30

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Celebrate Dolly Parton's incredible legacy and enjoy your favorite Dolly songs with others in the community. A painting class will be taught by BigVibesArtHouse starting at 6:30pm, where you can paint a Dolly Parton Portrait for the biggest Dolly fan in your life. A ticket for the Dolly painting class needs to be purchased ahead of time and includes your general admission and specialty Folklores beverage. Local vendors and artists are also joining as well. Performances by local cover artists will fill your spirit with Parton vibes all evening long. Wine reception while supplies last and BYOB for 21 and up.

Brick Sunday Arts Market

Sundays, 12-5 p.m.
The Blue Star Arts Complex 1414 South Alamo, San Antonio San Antonio

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The Brick Sunday Arts Market will provide wines, mimosas, champagne and lots of craft beer selections on sale for guests. Other local vendors will include rare vinyl record finds, custom art, photography, vintage clothing, pet goods, and more for purchase. The event will also host blue art performances and other activities for guests to enjoy.

Mothers, Daughters and Butterflies: A Reading by Reyna Grande

Mon., Sept. 23, 6-8 p.m.
Trinity University 1 Trinity Pl, San Antonio San Antonio

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Reyna Grande will be reading two pieces from an upcoming collection of essays. A book signing will follow the reading and conversation. Reyna Grande is the author of four critically acclaimed books - A Dream called Home (2018), The Distance Between Us (2012), Across a Hundred Mountains (2006) and Dancing with Butterflies (2009). Her essays and op-eds have appeared in The New York Times, Buzzfeed, CNN and more. 2109998373

"Tejanos in Texas Heritage" Exhibit

Mon., Sept. 23, 9 p.m.


The Patrick Heath Public Library will host an exhibit in the library's gallery titled "Tejanos in Texas Heritage," which will be running through October 23rd. 8302493053

Kanpai Masters- Taste of Japan

Every other Wednesday, 6:30-7:30 p.m.
Sushi Zushi (IH 10) 9867 Ih 10 W, San Antonio San Antonio

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All guests welcome, whether you are a native Japanese speaker or you want to learn the language for the first time or other things Japanese, this is the club for you. (210) 901-9322

Actors from the London Stage Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare from London, United Kingdom

Fri., Sept. 27, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

Buy Tickets$29-$99

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@ Charline McCombs Empire Theatre, 226 North St. Mary's Street, San Antonio, TX 78205
Mistaken identities, disguises and love triangles: Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night sees the great playwright blending his comic and dramatic devices with masterful dexterity. Presented by ARTS San Antonio. (210) 226-2891

Parabola: A Community Reading Series

Last Friday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Continues through Dec. 6
Confluence Park 310 W Mitchell St, San Antonio San Antonio


Gemini Ink is excited to announce the launch of a new monthly tradition created in partnership with the San Antonio River Foundation. The series is family-and pet-friendly, with plenty of parking and BYOB. Each reading features local, regional and nationally-recognized authors reading alongside emerging writers from across San Antonio. Head to Confluence Park each month as they celebrate our city's vibrant literary culture.

The Creativity of a Narrative Arc

Sat., Sept. 28, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.
Gemini Ink 1111 Navarro, San Antonio San Antonio


Join Gemini Ink for a Master Class with Ivelisse Rodriguez. Outlining and creativity are often seen as diametrical, but in writing a story, creativity isn’t enough, there has to be a certain structure in place to hold your story up. In this workshop, learn how to use the traditional narrative arc to outline and write stories. Gemini Ink will also help to identify key points integral to story making, such as the conflict, the climax, and the rising action. In doing so, you will learn to outline stories while also maintaining creativity. (210) 734-9673

Site-Specific W-I-P

Sat., Sept. 28, 1-3 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 29, 1-3 p.m.
Central Library 600 Soledad St., San Antonio San Antonio


Works In Progress (W-I-P) is in partnership with San Antonio Public Library to present Site-Specific W-I-P. Site specific art is work that is created in relation to a specific location. Site specific work is created and performed in conversation with a site’s architecture, history, community and culture. Invited artists will create work at the site of San Antonio Central Library. Performances will be followed by a light reception and a panel CRP dialogue session. Artists include Brandon Bulls, Jennifer Edmonds-Jones, Domeinic Jimenez, Laura Rios Ramirez and Rosie Torres, Claire Rousay and Matthew Eric Mendez. Donations are welcome at wipinsa.org (210) 207-2500

Open Writers Lab

Last Monday of every month. Continues through Dec. 18
Gemini Ink 1111 Navarro, San Antonio San Antonio


This peer-driven workshop, held the last Monday of each month, is open to writers of all levels. Facilitated by Gemini Ink volunteers Dario Beniquez and John McLennon. This writing lab is free to Gemini Ink members. You can become a member here: https://geminiink.org/membership/ (210) 734-9673

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