Calendar Events Tomorrow in San Antonio

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GET REEL: Boys Don’t Cry

Thu., June 27, 7 p.m.
McNay Art Museum 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


During Hilary Swank’s Oscar acceptance speech for her lead performance in 1999’s Boys Don’t Cry, Swank thanked Brandon Teena, the trans man she portrayed in the film who was raped and murdered six years prior to its theatrical release. “His legacy lives on through our movie to remind us to always be ourselves, to follow our hearts, to not conform,” she said. “I pray for the day when we not only accept our differences, but we actually celebrate our diversity.” Sadly, according to the most recent FBI statistics available, hate crimes against LGBTQ individuals increased in the United States during 2017. That’s why raising awareness is such a critical undertaking in the culture war we’re currently fighting in this country. The McNay Art Museum is doing its small part with its free Get Reel summer film series, which this year centers on films about gender identity. Next on the schedule: co-writer and director Kimberly Peirce’s honest and heart-wrenching drama that made Swank a star and swung open doors for other films about the underrepresented trans community to be produced like Transamerica, The Danish Girl and A Fantastic Woman. (210) 824-5368

“America on Stage”

Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through June 30
McNay Art Museum 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


Arguably one of the most overlooked aspects of the McNay is the the museum’s impressive Tobin Collection of Theatre Arts, which boasts more than 12,00o objects spanning from the 1500s to the present day. Built around a sprawling gift from late collector, philanthropist, theater patron and design enthusiast Robert L.B. Tobin and expanded by curators Linda Hardberger and Jody Blake, the collection encompasses rare books, small-scale models, costume illustrations and stage designs created by modern masters such as Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. Organized by Head of Curatorial Affairs René Paul Barilleaux and Curatorial Assistant Timothy Retzloff, the recently opened exhibition “America on Stage” aims to celebrate “the vision of the nation’s 20th- and 21st-century master designers on stages across the U.S. and around the world.” Exploring four key themes — Broadway, Nostalgia, Breaking Tradition, and Social Justice — the show combines maquettes from productions of Cabaret, In the Heights, West Side Story and You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown; a pop-up theater where guests can view scenes from a conceptual revival of Spring Awakening; and interactive areas that invite museum-goers to “take center stage in a recreated stage set — and even tap dance.” (210) 824-5368

Men of Steel, Women of Wonder

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 1
San Antonio Museum of Art 200 W. Jones Ave., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$12-$20


Evidenced by the global success of recent films such as Black Panther, Avengers: Endgame and Captain Marvel, among many others, the world is still captivated by the concept of superheroes. While less memorable examples might fall within that formulaic realm the New York Times summed up as “mental popcorn, meant to be rapidly consumed and forgotten,” the box office numbers prove we’re still collectively content to sit and watch statuesque freaks of nature fight off evil forces — even when the takeaway is minimal. Long before the schlock of what’s been dubbed “Hollywood’s Comic Book Age,” Superman and Wonder Woman captured imaginations as defenders of humanity fighting injustices amid the backdrops of the Great Depression and WWII. Introduced in 1938 and 1941, respectively, this iconic, spandex-clad pair inspire myriad incarnations in “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder,” an exhibition organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, and landing at the San Antonio Museum of Art this summer. Although it might conjure visions of comic cons and nerdy fan art, the traveling show digs deep into the cultural significance of both figures — and it isn’t an entirely kid-friendly affair. Curated by Alejo Benedetti, the collection of 70-plus paintings, photographs, videos and installations goes beyond the expected depictions of costumed heroism to explore sexuality, immigration, race, idolatry, desire and the very building blocks that made these characters possible. Spanning from the 1930s to the present day, “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder” builds an interpretive timeline in four thematic sections. Encompassing both the reverent and irreverent, the introductory section The Heroes We Know comprises photographer Siri Kaur’s amusing portraits of celebrity impersonators captured in mundane, contemporary contexts, Peter Saul’s playfully surreal painting Superman Versus the Toilet Duck and a provocative yet nostalgic installation by Jim Shaw, The Issue of My Loins, that showcases — and supersizes — Superman’s crotch. Placing the mythical stars in historical context, Origin Stories is reportedly the germinating seed for the entire exhibition. Here, real-life men of steel and women of wonder are presented in etchings of 1930s-era steel workers building the metropolis, photographs of women welding in the Willow Run bomber plant in the 1940s and Norman Rockwell’s 1943 painting of brawny machinist and feminist icon Rosie the Riveter eating a sandwich as the American flag billows in the background. Contrasting God-like power with traces of vulnerability, Glimpsing Humanity places our heroes in unexpected contexts: an alienated Superman reads the paper amid a barren landscape in Llyn Foulkes’ 1991 painting Where Did I Go Wrong and gets lit in Mike Kelley’s 1999 video Superman Recites Selections from “The Bell Jar” and Other Works by Sylvia Plath. Wonder Woman becomes a religious icon in Valetin Popov’s 2009 painting St. Wonder Woman and gets placed In Exile alongside the Virgin Mary, Aphrodite and others in Mary Beth Edelson’s mixed-media painting from 1989. Timely and provocative, the closing section Defender of the Innocent challenges stereotypes of gender and race while importantly reminding that both beloved characters are immigrants (he’s from Krypton, she’s from Themyscira, aka Paradise Island). Sarah Hill addresses the plight of a trans Wonder Woman in the 2014 video They Wonder; late San Antonio artist Mel Casas calls out the lack of diversity in the superhero realm in his painting Humanscape 70 (Comic Whitewash); Superman locks lips with Batman in Rich Simmons’ 2014 mixed-media work Between the Capes; Dulce Pinzón celebrates Mexican immigrants as working-class superheroes in staged photographs; and an installation attributed to the U.S. Department of Illegal Superheroes (ICE DISH) comes complete with a hotline where concerned citizens can report suspicious activity. As host venue, SAMA rises to the heroic occasion with an abundance of complementary programs, including talks with featured artists, weekly gallery talks, workshops, a Superhero Pajama Party (July 26) and outdoor screenings of Black Panther (June 28), Superman: The Movie (July 12), Nacho Libre (July 19), The Incredibles 2 (August 2), Batman (August 6), Wonder Woman (August 9), Birdman (August 16), Lu Over the Wall (August 23) and Superman II (August 30). (210) 978-8100

The State of Hand Stitch, New Embroidery by Texas Artists

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Continues through Aug. 9
UTSA Art Gallery - Main Campus One UTSA Circle, San Antonio San Antonio


"The State of Hand Stitch" is a survey of eleven women artists in Texas working with thread and needle at a time when embroidery is increasingly recognized as a medium of choice by serious artists. This exhibit displays a range of subject matter, scale, approach, and materials, demonstrating the many possibilities of contemporary stitch. (210) 458-4391

"Transcendental Tricentennial: Love Letters to San Anto, the (he)Art of David Zamora Casas"

Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through July 28
Institute of Texan Cultures 801 E César Chávez Blvd, San Antonio San Antonio

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Over the last four decades, self-described “artivist” David Zamora Casas has delighted, shocked and intrigued San Antonio audiences with paintings, installations, altars and performance works that essentially present the artist himself as a canvas. Fusing elements of folk and outsider art with nods to the aesthetics of Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí, the DIY spirit of rasquachismo, religious iconography and Latinx and LGBTQ* activism, Casas has established something many artists strive for fruitlessly: an instantly recognizable aesthetic that’s distinctly their own. Nicknamed Nuclear Meltdown and dubbed a “clown shaman” by esteemed author and MacArthur Genius Sandra Cisneros, Casas often makes cameos in his own paintings, his fire-engine red lips, devilish goatee and Dalí-esque mustache emerging from surreal tableaus populated by skulls, deities, monkeys and mermaids swimming amid swirling patterns, Mesoamerican symbols and hand-painted text reminiscent of retablos. In the words of Chicano art specialist Tomas Ybarra-Frausto, Casas’ canvases “mix word and image to visualize autobiographical and universal stories  of homoerotic love, loss and persistent social concerns including immigration, environmental plunder, gender disparity and the multiple issues facing marginalized individuals and communities.” Billed as an artistic explosion of “folk-baroque manifestations” exploring themes ranging from indigenous history to gender fluidity, Casas’ new solo show “Transcendental Tricentennial” comprises “miles of ribbon, yards of fabric, embellished prints, various on-site assemblages, oil and acrylic paintings on canvas, barbed-wire and bone sculptures, and a Día de los Muertos ofrenda which spills into our collective consciousness.” Made possible by a grant from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), the “mega-installation” also involves creative collaborations with the likes of accordion queen Eva Ybarra and video/film producers Laura Varela and Fadela Gacis Castro. As for its slightly unexpected landing at the Institute of Texan Cultures, Casas reminds that the exhibition evokes the ITC’s mission to be “a lesson in diversity [that] shows the uniqueness and beauty of the many cultures that came to Texas.” (210) 458-2300

Daniel Rios Rodriguez & Raul Gonzalez

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 18
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


With a powerful trio of exhibitions already on view, Artpace gives us two more reasons to visit this spring with the unveiling of new projects by San Antonio-based artists Daniel Rios Rodriguez and Raul Gonzalez. Although Rodriguez and Gonzalez explore wildly different topics and themes, their bright and bold bodies of work find common ground in playful energy, DIY aesthetics and transformations of commonplace materials. A Houston transplant who earned an MFA from UTSA along with grants from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, the Surdna Foundation and the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), Gonzalez has long been fixated on the concept of work in many forms — construction, manual labor and his dual roles as a “werking artist” and undeniably cool stay-at-home dad. He’s captured the everyday joys of fatherhood in figurative drawings, celebrated his love for Whataburger and the Houston Astros in paintings and installations, enhanced his exhibitions with energetic, movement-based performances and even danced for 4.3 miles — continuously from downtown to the McNay. With a title lifted from a song by bygone Texas hip-hop duo UGK, his “Front and Back, and Side to Side” promises to transform Artpace’s Main Space windows with a “multi-dimensional mural” rendered in cardboard and colored duct tape. (Cue the selfies). A native of Killeen who earned his MFA from Yale and has exhibited in New York, Chicago, Marfa, Ireland and beyond, Rodriguez takes a tactile approach to small-scale “semi-figurative” paintings inspired by personal experiences and the natural world. Frequently using oddly shaped, homemade panels, he paints scenes and patterns in thick, textural layers, adding organic-looking embellishments such as stones, shells and feathers, and finishing the pieces with earthy frames rendered in found bits of wood, rope, wire and hardware accents. Bringing to mind everything from cave drawings and tribal symbology to folk and outsider art, Rodriguez’s work comes to light in “Bruisers,” his first ever solo show in Texas. Nodding to the battle scars we collect while navigating life on Earth, Rodriguez says the exhibition title also speaks to the surfaces of his paintings, many of which “undergo a lot of heavy hitting and burning and throwing across the floor.” During the opening reception, both artists will give short talks about their work and Artpace will also be rolling out a new Third Thursdays series that kicks off with a rooftop screening of shorts curated by the San Antonio Film Festival ($5-$10, 8pm Thu, May 16). (210) 212-4900

Nate Cassie and Constance Lowe: Minding the Gaps

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through July 13
Ruiz-Healy Art 201-A E. Olmos Dr., San Antonio San Antonio


Although its title might conjure the sights and sounds of crowded London Underground stations, Ruiz-Healy Art’s new exhibition “Minding the Gaps” is not an artistic exploration of railway safety. Rather than addressing the potentially life-threatening distances between subway platforms and train cars, the gaps to be mindful of here are substantially more conceptual in nature. Blurring the boundaries between figuration and abstraction, form and function, the two-person show examines domesticity, permutation and perception while pairing sculptural works by mixed-media artists Nate Cassie and Constance Lowe. A New Jersey native who earned an MFA from UTSA and has exhibited at Artpace, the McNay and Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., Cassie works between drawing, painting, sculpture, video and digital media. While his previous bodies of work have taken shape in abstract woodblock prints named after flowers, architectural birdhouses and etchings of spindly Texas trees, Cassie’s recent output falls within the realm of functional ceramics. While not immediately clear from their earthy finishes and organic imperfections, his almost ancient-looking jugs, cups and bottles reference hard-to-define “spaces in between” and the “gaps that distance surface from volume, skin and structure, formal and intuitive systems.” Missouri-born Lowe earned an MFA from Western Michigan University, has shown at the Southwest School of Art and the Phoenix Art Museum and, like Cassie, is an alum of Artpace’s International Artist-in-Residence program. Although perhaps better known for geometric abstractions that fuse elements of photography and fiber art, Lowe also pushes her work into a sculptural realm with curious objects that suggest interventions on furniture or household decor. Whether combining calfskin, vinyl, felt, wood, mirrors or hardware, her three-dimensional pieces often draw inspiration from her family’s history of Midwestern farming. As for the “gaps” in question, they reveal themselves in the context of Lowe’s interest in “the abstraction of farmland as seen from the air” — and specifically the painterly photographs of the Earth captured by NASA’s Landsat satellite. (210) 804-2219

Looking for Langston

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11

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Although his resume includes writing and directing credits for the award-winning coming-of-age drama Young Soul Rebels (1991) and the blaxploitation documentary BaadAsssss Cinema (2002), British filmmaker and installation artist Isaac Julien is arguably better known for conceptual films presented on multiple screens simultaneously. Seemingly dissected and left for viewers to reassemble with their own eyes, these immersive projects have involved journeys to remote ice caves in Iceland, juxtapositions of Arctic and African landscapes, travels through China and curious collaborations with the likes of Tilda Swinton and James Franco. A co-founder of the Sankofa Film and Video Collective (an organization “dedicated to developing an independent black film culture in the areas of production, exhibition and audience”), Julien made one of his earliest waves with Looking for Langston — a 1989 film billed as “a lyrical exploration — and recreation — of the private world of poet, social activist, novelist, playwright and columnist Langston Hughes (1902-1967) and his fellow black artists and writers who formed the Harlem Renaissance during the 1920s.” In essence a non-linear homage that presents Hughes as a metaphor for the black gay experience, the film has earned cult status and is taught extensively in universities as part of African-American and queer studies programs. Appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2017, Julien was a favorite of late local artist and philanthropist Linda Pace, who acquired more than 50 of his works during her lifetime. In celebration of Looking for Langston’s 30th anniversary, the Linda Pace Foundation’s gallery Studio at Ruby City showcases the 45-minute film as the anchor of a new exhibition of two recently acquired photographs Julien shot during production — Film-Noir Angels and Masquerade No. 3.

"Bruce Lee Shoes"

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through July 20
Cinnabar Art Gallery 1420 South Alamo, #147, San Antonio San Antonio


Cinnabar’s latest exhibition showcases the work of Emanuel De Sousa, a Portugese-born, London-based artist who puts a poppy spin on portraiture. In addition to nods to iconic martial artist Bruce Lee and his yellow jumpsuits, De Sousa’s latest series of paintings features porcelain dogs, mylar balloons and other objects plucked from “tiny closed universes where absurd, nonsensical realities make sense.” (210) 557-6073 (FAX); (210)

Sink, Florida, Sink

Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through June 30
The Public Theater of San Antonio 800 W. Ashby Pl., San Antonio Central

Buy Tickets$10-$35


A new play has risen from the depths and washed ashore at The Public Theater. As part of The Public’s Fresh Ink program, Shannon Jarrell-Ivey directs the world premiere of David Kimple’s near-future, semi-apocalyptic drama Sink, Florida, Sink. In the face of a 12th successive hurricane (climate change much?), Violet (Alyx Irene Gonzales), Sebastian (Ivan A. Ortega) and the other remaining residents of coastal hamlet Cocoa Beach must fight to keep their heads above water in more ways than one. While doing everything they can to keep their home afloat, Violet and Sebastian must confront a whole other storm when a mysterious stranger from their past reappears in town. Truly, in Cocoa Beach, it’s not just the hurricane-force winds you have to weather. (210) 733-7258

Jaston Williams in Don’t Blame the Car

June 27-29, 8 p.m., June 29-30, 2 p.m. and Sun., June 30, 7 p.m.
Classic Theatre of San Antonio 1924 Fredericksburg Rd., San Antonio Balcones Heights

Buy Tickets$25


Jaston Williams is making his annual pilgrimage to The Classic Theatre with his latest one-man show: Don’t Blame the Car. Known for the slew of southern characters he’s portrayed in Greater Tuna (with partner Joe Sears) and other one-man shows like A Wolverine Walks Into a Bar…Conversations Over Ice and Clear to Partly Crazy, Williams has parlayed his wildcard humor and cheeky costumes (notably including the chicken getup he donned for I’m Not Lying) into a long-running career as an actor, comedian and writer. For Don’t Blame the Car, Williams delves into the follies of his teenage years, centered on his parents’ attempts to teach him to drive despite the fact that at 4’11” he could barely see over the steering wheel. Come for the vehicular humor, and stay to finally learn why Williams carries a “lifelong grudge against potatoes,” plus much more. (210) 589-8450

Key Party

Thursdays, 8-9 p.m.
Bexar Stage 1203 Camden St., San Antonio Downtown

Buy TicketsFree


Bexar Stage hosts a completely free and improvised BYOB show in which performers choose keys from a bowl and invite audience members on stage to share an honest conversation with a fluid ensemble. Guests can enjoy free beer samples courtesy of Alamo Beer. (312) 971-7252

Go’Shen Point BBQ Food Truck at Hyatt Regency San Antonio

Thu., June 27, 4 p.m.-12 a.m.


@ Hyatt Regency San Antonio, 123 Losoya Street, San Antonio, Texas, 78205
The Go’Shen Point BBQ food truck will be stationed at Hyatt Regency San Antonio’s front drive on Thursday, June 27. It will be serving traditional southern-style BBQ between 4 p.m. and midnight.

Burger Bash - Second Annual

Thu., June 27, 4:30-7:30 p.m.

Buy TicketsFree

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@ MacArthur Park, 1611 NE Interstate 410 Loop, San Antonio, TX 78217
NAWIC San Antonio invites you to enjoy free burgers to support the NAWIC scholarship fund. Everyone is welcome. There will be a best tasting burger contest, a people's choice award and raffle prizes. The event is located at MacArthur Park Pavilion 4 near 410 and Nacogdoches. (210) 572-1378

Rose Wine Tasting!

Thu., June 27, 6-8 p.m.

Buy Tickets$30


@ Meadow Neighborhood Eatery, 555 W. Bitters Rd, San Antonio, TX 78216
Enjoy a rose wine tasting with paired snacks by chef PJ Edwards on the patio at Meadow Neighborhood Eatery and Bar! The entry fee is $30 per person and you must be 21+. (210) 481-4214

Big Bend on the Rocks

Thu., June 27, 6-8 p.m.
The Cherrity Bar 302 Montana St, San Antonio East Side

Buy Tickets$25


Join Cherrity Bar's Big Bend on the Rocks event, a cocktail event celebrating Big Bend National Park. The event will have live music, cocktails from Dorcol Distilling and more at this family and pet friendly location. First 50 registrants get a free rocks glass and appetizers. (512) 529-1149

Boys Don't Cry

Thu., June 27, 7-9 p.m.
McNay Art Museum 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


Director Kimberly Peirce’s biographical film dramatizes the real-life story of trans man Brandon Teena, portrayed by Hilary Swank, and his girlfriend Lana Tisdel. Like many trans individuals, Brandon fell victim to a hate crime after being outed. For her role in 'Boys Don't Cry,' Swank won an Academy Award for Best Actress. (210) 824-5368

Algo Caliente

Thu., June 27, 10 p.m.-2 a.m.

Buy TicketsFree

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@ Element ultra lounge, 1581 Bandera rd San Antonio 78228
The show will be held at the club Element Thursday June 27th. Sam Sage And DJ La Moon will be performing their hit song “Algo Sexual” which is available now on all platforms. There will also be performances by Ayo Tamz and DJ Suxxy Puxxy. Brought to you by KAMM Entertainment and Estudios 1070. (254) 350-8189

Pride Weekend at The Bonham Exchange

Thu., June 27, 8 p.m.-2 a.m., Fri., June 28, 8 p.m.-3 a.m., Sat., June 29, 8 p.m.-3 a.m. and Sun., June 30, 3-7 & 8 p.m.-2 a.m.
The Bonham Exchange 411 Bonham, San Antonio Downtown


Join in at The Bonham Exchange for Pride Weekend! Thursday's Pride Kickoff features $1 Drinks all night long and no Cover for 21+. The Friday Night Dance Party and Hot Chest Contest has no cover for 21+ if you know the secret password! 21+ get in free until 10pm during the Saturday Night Takeover and Sunday Funday is the Trash Disco Day Party: Pride Edition, with doors opening at 3pm for a Hangover Market until 7pm followed by the Bonham Babes Drag Show at midnight. (210) 271-3811

Beer Pong Tournament

Last Thursday of every month, 9:30-11:30 p.m.
The Hangar 8203 Broadway St., San Antonio San Antonio


The Hangar's beer pong tournament is held on the last Thursday of each month. Registration kicks off at 9:30pm and the tournament begins at 10pm. (210) 824-2700

Harlequin OutStander Awards Call for Nominees & Feel Good Day

Through July 31, 12 a.m.-11:45 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 5, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Omni La Mansion Del Rio Hotel 112 College St, San Antonio San Antonio

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Harlequin OutStander Awards nominees are sought for the following categories: Person of Positivity (those showing resilience, faith, optimism, overcoming challenges), Harlequin Hometown Hero (women serving and protecting with bravery, inspiring courage and commitment to the collective good), Community Catalyst (advocates, volunteers, contributors who affect positive change for populations at risk or in need), Cultural Champion (those committed to making arts/literacy programs accessible for all), and Millennial Groundbreaker (making waves through philanthropic or entrepreneurial efforts or their active citizenship). Nominate someone at: www.celebratefeelgood.com. San Antonio winners will be honored on Feel Good Day, October 5. Nominations are free and tickets for the event are $199. (416) 840-2732

Blastoff Fireworks Open June 24th- July 4th

Through July 4, 10 a.m.-12 p.m.


@ Blastoff Fireworks, 19145 Bandera Rd.
Cutting edge fireworks brought to you from Blast who comes from a distant pyro galaxy. She has conjured only the best for her earthlings with over 400 different fireworks! Her minions will present to you their best wares. On July 4th, from 11 AM - 3 PM, there will be free face painting by Brie Hopkins. (210) 414-0394

Summer Doesn't End at Main Event Entertainment!

Through Aug. 2, 10 a.m.-11 p.m.
Main Event Entertainment 8514 State Hwy 151, San Antonio San Antonio


Looking for things to do this summer? Looking for something FUN? It’s time to level up with the Main Event Summer Season Pass, where you can enjoy the full extent of summer FUN! The Endless Summer Season Pass lets guests enjoy all-you-can-play activities – bowling, billiards, laser tag and gravity ropes – and exclusive discounts, all day, every day from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day for only $60 per guest. It pays for itself in as few as three visits! (*offer available at both San Antonio and Memphis centers). (210) 521-8000

Pizza a la Valeria

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-9 p.m. Continues through Sept. 4
Valeria Ristorante Italiano 109 Waterview Parkway #105, Boerne Boerne

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Dine at Valeria every Wednesday through Saturday to indulge in a delicious variety of classic wood-fired pizzas. All pizzas are hand stretched to approximately 12 inches, making them a perfect meal for one or delicious appetizer for the whole family. (830) 331-1393

Monthly Cultural Dance Workshops

Mondays-Sundays. Continues through Dec. 21
Smash Dance 6883 Bandera Rd, San Antonio Leon Valley

Buy Tickets$10

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Join a cultural dance workshop and be a part of the diversity Project SMASH offers. Ranging from the styles of Afro-Beats to belly dance and others in between, Smash Dance's instructors will take you on a dancing journey around the world. Donation proceeds allow Project SMASH to continue offering dance scholarships to members of the community who could otherwise not afford classes. Project SMASH also gives back to the community by partnering with other local, non-profit organizations to provide dance fitness services at their facilities. (210) 201-2873

Going Places

Mondays-Sundays. Continues through Sept. 8
The DoSeum 2800 Broadway St, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$14


The DoSeum’s summer exhibition, Going Places, kids can explore how we drive, float, glide, and zoom. This Stem experience will immerse visitors into the science of getting around over land, sea, air and space. With 17 play-centered exhibits, they will encounter concepts like velocity, gravity, buoyancy, aerodynamics, energy efficiency, space science, carbon footprint and design. (210) 212-4453

Swing Kids Summer Dance Camp

Through June 28
American Legion Post #2 3518 Fredericksburg Rd, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$190


Join the American Legion for excitement, fun and learning social skills. Mornings are for ages 9-13 from 9am-12:30pm and afternoons ages 14-18 from 1pm-4:30pm. There are teachers with over 25 years experience and credentials with Rob van Haaren. There will be 17 hours of swing dance lessons with a dj, live band dance and much more. Included in event is a swing t-shirt along with some scholarships opportunities with sponsorship from Swing Junction, Alamo City Swing Revival and the American Legion Alamo Post #2 in San Antonio. 512.393.1622

Sparkling Nights at Eddie V’s

Through July 28, 5-10 p.m.


@ Eddie V's, 1834 N Loop 1604 W. San Antonio, TX 78248
Inspired by a French summer soirée, Eddie V’s today popped open its signature summer event, Sparkling Nights. The eight-week celebration offers guests a winning combination of a French-inspired lobster tasting trio and French champagne or wine. For $25, Eddie V’s is serving up a bit of French flair with the Sparkling Nights menu featuring champagne and wine favorites from France- Veuve Clicquot, Miraval Rosé, and Louis Latour Mercurey Burgundy 2016 - with a tasting trio of Lobster Tempura, Lobster and Potato Croquette, and a nostalgic Mini Lobster Thermidor—all featuring Coldwater South African Lobster. (210) 493-1600

Kellen Stanley: "Rite of Passage"

Saturdays, 12-8 p.m., Sundays, 12-5 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 5-8 p.m. Continues through June 30
FL!GHT Gallery 112R Blue Star, San Antonio Southtown


Kellen Stanley's solo show, "Rite of Passage," will open on Thursday 6/6 at 7-8:30 PM, with the artist activating the installation in a durational performance. The body of work is text-based and features poetry depicting the artist's mother who once was a painter before switching career tracks to education. The performance will reveal the installation of poetry one line at a time much like excavating an archaeological site. (210) 872-2586

Teacher Appreciation Thursdays

Thursdays, 4 p.m.-12 a.m. Continues through Aug. 29
The Aquaduck Beer Garden 9214 Espada Road, San Antonio South Side


Teachers, come gather around with some delicious drinks and brainstorm on how we can make our Thursdays special for YOU! For now, $3.00 margaritas all summer long along with karaoke, music, extended happy hour till 9:00PM, food trucks and a heck of a lot of appreciation! (210) 600-3280

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