Events in San Antonio with Image

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The March Divide

Fri., July 19, 6 p.m.
The Point Park & Eats 24188 Boerne Stage Rd, San Antonio San Antonio


The local indie-rock outfit March Divide, helmed by Josh Putnam, draws from a wide array of influences. It also boasts a track record of putting out consistently good recordings. (210) 251-3380; (210) (FAX)

Square Hammer: A Tribute to Ghost, The Maension, Deadly Omens

Fri., July 19, 7:30 p.m.
Bond's 007 Rock Bar 450 Soledad, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$10-$15


With carbon copies of costumes, mannerisms and songs, Square Hammer’s Resurrection tour honors the band that opened for Iron Maiden in 2017 at the AT&T Center. The rituals are so precise, the real Papa Emeritus may not know whether to be flattered or feel left out. (210) 660-3091

The Try Guys: Legends of the Internet

Fri., July 19, 7:30 p.m.
The Majestic Theatre 224 E Houston, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy from Ticketmaster$38.50-$88.50

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YouTube wunderkinder The Try Guys have parlayed their willingness to bare all (whether it be their buns in Victoria’s Secret underwear or coming out as gay with a gorgeously choreographed dance video) into a behemoth brand that now includes a podcast (the “Trypod”), book (The Hidden Power of F*cking Up) and a brand spanking new live show, for which they’ve pulled out all the stops to create an experience that’ll knock your socks off. They’re bringing everything you love about the Try Guys to the stage, plus audience participation, costume changes and a liberal dose of both glitter and pyrotechnics. This is no vanity project — the boys have poured their hearts, souls and dough into this show in the hope of connecting with their fans in a brand new, technicolor way. (210) 226-3333

Menopause: The Musical

Fri., July 19, 8 p.m.
Tobin Center for the Performing Arts 100 Auditorium Circle, San Antonio River Walk

Buy Tickets$29.50-$74.50


Ah, menopause… the hormonal bogeywoman whose promise of ended periods is marred by her own monstrous symptoms. Menopause the Musical spotlights four characters from different walks of life that collide while lingerie shopping, and they have nothing in common but “the change.” Performed in 16 countries, the story celebrates the universal horror and humor of hot flashes and night sweats. The women — Professional Woman, Earth Mother, Iowa Housewife and Soap Star — each give their takes on popular tunes from the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, including “Puff, My God I’m Draggin’” and “Stayin’ Awake.” Grab your gang of lady friends and stuff some extra Kleenex in your purse, because this show may make you cry laughing, whether or not menopause has come knocking on your door. (210) 223-8624

Cocktail: The Event

Fri., July 19, 8-11 p.m.
San Antonio Botanical Garden 555 Funston, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$55-$90


Cocktail: The Event celebrates San Antonio’s thriving cocktail culture, spotlighting fifteen of the city’s top bars. Each participating drinkery is tasked with serving samples of an inventive cocktail, inspired by this year's Tiki theme! Guests will experience bites by a dozen of San Antonio’s best restaurants, live music and DJs, a costume contest and much more, all while exploring the stunning San Antonio Botanical Garden grounds. (210) 536-1400

Pink Floyd: The Wall Movie Screening

Fri., July 19, 8 p.m.
Aztec Theatre 104 N St Mary's St, San Antonio San Antonio


Tear down that wall, shave off your eyebrows and don’t trust the government (Big “Mother” is gonna get ya), Pink Floyd’s epic rock opera-turned 1982 film The Wall is making a big screen return for one night only. Themes of isolation, politics and insanity combined with soaring guitar solos, theatrics and poignant storytelling never sounded – and looked – so good. (210) 812-4355

Bubble Puppy and The Damn Torpedoes

Fri., July 19, 8 p.m.
Sam's Burger Joint 330 E. Grayson St., San Antonio San Antonio


A lot of folks don’t realize that Texas’ contribution to ’60s psychedelic rock, while not as storied as California’s, was pretty damned significant. With homegrown bands like Moving Sidewalks and the 13th Floor Elevators priming local ears, Central Texas emerged as a tour hotspot for bands pumping fuzz through big amps. Maybe that explains how San Antonio psych act Bubble Puppy landed an opening slot for the Who back in 1967. Half a century later, Bubble Puppy is still around — and with a newish LP called Certified Badass. Don’t miss these Texas legends as they perform their hit “Hot Smoke and Sassafras” along with other amazing tunes featuring fleet-fingered fretwork. The Damn Torpedoes — a Tribute to Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers — rounds out the bill. (210) 223-2830

Speedway (Smiths and Morrisey tribute)

Fri., July 19, 8 p.m.
The Amp Room 2407 N St. Mary's, San Antonio St. Mary's strip

Buy Tickets$12


With Morrissey becoming more and more problematic — see his recent support of far-right groups in his native England — fans of the former Smiths singer may feel conflicted about supporting his live shows (when he actually puts in an appearance). Speedway, a live tribute to Morrisey and The Smiths, might be just the solution to enjoying Moz’s music in a live setting without those guilty feels.

Colectivo Flamenco with Andrea Hernandez

Fri., July 19, 8:30 p.m.
Carmens de la Calle Café 320 N. Flores St., San Antonio Central


Feast your eyes and ears on Colectivo Flamenco as the singers, guitarist and dancers fan the flame of passion within you. In addition to enjoying the romantic beauty of one Spain’s most beloved forms of expression, you can also feast on tapas and house-made sangria as you take in the show. (210) 737-8272

So Far Gone (Drake Night)

Fri., July 19, 9 p.m.
Paper Tiger 2410 N. St. Mary's St., San Antonio St. Mary's strip

Buy from TicketFly$5


Here’s your night to get Drizzy. Come out to dance and drink and celebrate the Toronto Raptors’ first and last NBA championship with music all night from the Canada’s leading rap export.

26th Annual Balcones Heights Jazz Festival

Fri., July 19, 7:30-10 p.m., Fri., July 26, 7:30-10 p.m. and Fri., Aug. 2, 7:30-10 p.m.
Wonderland of the Americas Amphitheatre 4522 Fredericksburg Rd., San Antonio San Antonio

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For fans of smooth jazz in San Antonio and beyond, the Balcones Heights Jazz Festival is an institution at this point. The free festival, now in its 26th year, consistently offers up some of the best regional talent in the ear-candy subgenre. This year, the event organizers expect, based on previous numbers, to welcome more than 4,000 festival-goers over the course of the four Fridays of the fest. The latest installment of the quirky festival has the unique distinction of featuring an all-woman lineup — a rarity for any genre of music, really — for the very first time. Festival organizer Lorenzo Nastasi said in a press release that the idea to go all-woman this year was inspired by, and in part to be understood as a celebration of, the many women in leadership positions in Balcones Heights. It’s ultimately an admirable and exciting move by the organizers. Slated performers are Wednesday Ball and Ragan Whiteside (July 12), MiChelle Garibay-Carey and Jessy J (July 19), Elizabeth Mis and Jeanette Harris (July 26) and Kayla Waters and Lindsey Webster (August 2). Each performer will, as per tradition, get more than an hour of stage time.

Men of Steel, Women of Wonder

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 1
San Antonio Museum of Art 200 W. Jones Ave., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$12-$20


Evidenced by the global success of recent films such as Black Panther, Avengers: Endgame and Captain Marvel, among many others, the world is still captivated by the concept of superheroes. While less memorable examples might fall within that formulaic realm the New York Times summed up as “mental popcorn, meant to be rapidly consumed and forgotten,” the box office numbers prove we’re still collectively content to sit and watch statuesque freaks of nature fight off evil forces — even when the takeaway is minimal. Long before the schlock of what’s been dubbed “Hollywood’s Comic Book Age,” Superman and Wonder Woman captured imaginations as defenders of humanity fighting injustices amid the backdrops of the Great Depression and WWII. Introduced in 1938 and 1941, respectively, this iconic, spandex-clad pair inspire myriad incarnations in “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder,” an exhibition organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, and landing at the San Antonio Museum of Art this summer. Although it might conjure visions of comic cons and nerdy fan art, the traveling show digs deep into the cultural significance of both figures — and it isn’t an entirely kid-friendly affair. Curated by Alejo Benedetti, the collection of 70-plus paintings, photographs, videos and installations goes beyond the expected depictions of costumed heroism to explore sexuality, immigration, race, idolatry, desire and the very building blocks that made these characters possible. Spanning from the 1930s to the present day, “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder” builds an interpretive timeline in four thematic sections. Encompassing both the reverent and irreverent, the introductory section The Heroes We Know comprises photographer Siri Kaur’s amusing portraits of celebrity impersonators captured in mundane, contemporary contexts, Peter Saul’s playfully surreal painting Superman Versus the Toilet Duck and a provocative yet nostalgic installation by Jim Shaw, The Issue of My Loins, that showcases — and supersizes — Superman’s crotch. Placing the mythical stars in historical context, Origin Stories is reportedly the germinating seed for the entire exhibition. Here, real-life men of steel and women of wonder are presented in etchings of 1930s-era steel workers building the metropolis, photographs of women welding in the Willow Run bomber plant in the 1940s and Norman Rockwell’s 1943 painting of brawny machinist and feminist icon Rosie the Riveter eating a sandwich as the American flag billows in the background. Contrasting God-like power with traces of vulnerability, Glimpsing Humanity places our heroes in unexpected contexts: an alienated Superman reads the paper amid a barren landscape in Llyn Foulkes’ 1991 painting Where Did I Go Wrong and gets lit in Mike Kelley’s 1999 video Superman Recites Selections from “The Bell Jar” and Other Works by Sylvia Plath. Wonder Woman becomes a religious icon in Valetin Popov’s 2009 painting St. Wonder Woman and gets placed In Exile alongside the Virgin Mary, Aphrodite and others in Mary Beth Edelson’s mixed-media painting from 1989. Timely and provocative, the closing section Defender of the Innocent challenges stereotypes of gender and race while importantly reminding that both beloved characters are immigrants (he’s from Krypton, she’s from Themyscira, aka Paradise Island). Sarah Hill addresses the plight of a trans Wonder Woman in the 2014 video They Wonder; late San Antonio artist Mel Casas calls out the lack of diversity in the superhero realm in his painting Humanscape 70 (Comic Whitewash); Superman locks lips with Batman in Rich Simmons’ 2014 mixed-media work Between the Capes; Dulce Pinzón celebrates Mexican immigrants as working-class superheroes in staged photographs; and an installation attributed to the U.S. Department of Illegal Superheroes (ICE DISH) comes complete with a hotline where concerned citizens can report suspicious activity. As host venue, SAMA rises to the heroic occasion with an abundance of complementary programs, including talks with featured artists, weekly gallery talks, workshops, a Superhero Pajama Party (July 26) and outdoor screenings of Black Panther (June 28), Superman: The Movie (July 12), Nacho Libre (July 19), The Incredibles 2 (August 2), Batman (August 6), Wonder Woman (August 9), Birdman (August 16), Lu Over the Wall (August 23) and Superman II (August 30). (210) 978-8100

Juana Córdova, Francis Almendárez, Narcissister

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 8
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


The latest round of Artpace's International Artist-in-Residence program demands to be heard as much as seen. Each of the artists elected by guest curator Karina Aguilera Skvirsky has created visually distinct and seemingly disparate bodies of work, but the exhibitions are united by the presence of sound. For "Chronicles of Uprooting," Juana Córdova (Cuenca, Ecuador) collected samples of tumbleweed, an immigrant plant that made its way to the American West via a shipment of flaxseed from Russia, and achiote seeds, a plant common to the tropics of Latin America that has been used to give flavor and color to food, cosmetics and textiles since the Pre-Columbian era. The space is filled with a gentle droning, provided both by fans that keep three tumbleweeds spinning aloft in transparent tubes and a video installation featuring the frenetic movement of insects. From the winding roads of flattened tumbleweed unspooled on the wall to a diaspora of achiote seeds mounted in a corner, Córdova renders the journeys of immigrant peoples in miniature, metaphorically connecting the movement of flora to human migration worldwide. Francis Almendárez (Houston) focuses on the rhythms of work both commercial and domestic in "rhythm and (p)leisure." Shot in Honduras and El Salvador, the multi-screen video installation is abuzz with the myriad sounds of human tasks, whether it be a man hammering the soles of counterfeit Nike sneakers, a woman gently sweeping a tile floor or a group drumming on a street corner. From the rushed pace of the city to the more leisurely speed of the countryside, Almendárez has captured the processes of human work, both material and immaterial, and reveals how even activities we view as leisure are still "work" in their own right. Piles of clothes on pallets offer the viewer a place to sit or recline, but this is merely a brief respite before the garments reenter the global circulation of sale, resale and disposal. Masked artist Narcissister (New York, New York) is a provocateur whose performance art has been seen in venues from burlesque clubs to America's Got Talent. While functionally silent, the bombastic imagery of the erotic collages included in "Wimmin" are loud in their own way, unapologetically confronting the intersection of femininity, race and sexuality. However, the artist's work also possesses an auditory component that arises when pieces are "activated" (a term she isn't particularly fond of) in performance. During the free opening reception, performances will cycle every half hour, featuring small gestures such as the swishing of the fabric of a formal dress as it's wrapped around a body encased in a bale of aluminum cans and the echoing clank of the pan-eyelids of an assembled face being opened by an anonymous performer, who completes the structure's features with a large, pierced nose worn on her back. (210) 212-4900

The State of Hand Stitch, New Embroidery by Texas Artists

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Continues through Aug. 9
UTSA Art Gallery - Main Campus One UTSA Circle, San Antonio San Antonio


"The State of Hand Stitch" is a survey of eleven women artists in Texas working with thread and needle at a time when embroidery is increasingly recognized as a medium of choice by serious artists. This exhibit displays a range of subject matter, scale, approach, and materials, demonstrating the many possibilities of contemporary stitch. (210) 458-4391

"Transcendental Tricentennial: Love Letters to San Anto, the (he)Art of David Zamora Casas"

Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through July 28
Institute of Texan Cultures 801 E César Chávez Blvd, San Antonio San Antonio

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Over the last four decades, self-described “artivist” David Zamora Casas has delighted, shocked and intrigued San Antonio audiences with paintings, installations, altars and performance works that essentially present the artist himself as a canvas. Fusing elements of folk and outsider art with nods to the aesthetics of Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí, the DIY spirit of rasquachismo, religious iconography and Latinx and LGBTQ* activism, Casas has established something many artists strive for fruitlessly: an instantly recognizable aesthetic that’s distinctly their own. Nicknamed Nuclear Meltdown and dubbed a “clown shaman” by esteemed author and MacArthur Genius Sandra Cisneros, Casas often makes cameos in his own paintings, his fire-engine red lips, devilish goatee and Dalí-esque mustache emerging from surreal tableaus populated by skulls, deities, monkeys and mermaids swimming amid swirling patterns, Mesoamerican symbols and hand-painted text reminiscent of retablos. In the words of Chicano art specialist Tomas Ybarra-Frausto, Casas’ canvases “mix word and image to visualize autobiographical and universal stories  of homoerotic love, loss and persistent social concerns including immigration, environmental plunder, gender disparity and the multiple issues facing marginalized individuals and communities.” Billed as an artistic explosion of “folk-baroque manifestations” exploring themes ranging from indigenous history to gender fluidity, Casas’ new solo show “Transcendental Tricentennial” comprises “miles of ribbon, yards of fabric, embellished prints, various on-site assemblages, oil and acrylic paintings on canvas, barbed-wire and bone sculptures, and a Día de los Muertos ofrenda which spills into our collective consciousness.” Made possible by a grant from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), the “mega-installation” also involves creative collaborations with the likes of accordion queen Eva Ybarra and video/film producers Laura Varela and Fadela Gacis Castro. As for its slightly unexpected landing at the Institute of Texan Cultures, Casas reminds that the exhibition evokes the ITC’s mission to be “a lesson in diversity [that] shows the uniqueness and beauty of the many cultures that came to Texas.” (210) 458-2300

Daniel Rios Rodriguez & Raul Gonzalez

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 18
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


With a powerful trio of exhibitions already on view, Artpace gives us two more reasons to visit this spring with the unveiling of new projects by San Antonio-based artists Daniel Rios Rodriguez and Raul Gonzalez. Although Rodriguez and Gonzalez explore wildly different topics and themes, their bright and bold bodies of work find common ground in playful energy, DIY aesthetics and transformations of commonplace materials. A Houston transplant who earned an MFA from UTSA along with grants from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, the Surdna Foundation and the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), Gonzalez has long been fixated on the concept of work in many forms — construction, manual labor and his dual roles as a “werking artist” and undeniably cool stay-at-home dad. He’s captured the everyday joys of fatherhood in figurative drawings, celebrated his love for Whataburger and the Houston Astros in paintings and installations, enhanced his exhibitions with energetic, movement-based performances and even danced for 4.3 miles — continuously from downtown to the McNay. With a title lifted from a song by bygone Texas hip-hop duo UGK, his “Front and Back, and Side to Side” promises to transform Artpace’s Main Space windows with a “multi-dimensional mural” rendered in cardboard and colored duct tape. (Cue the selfies). A native of Killeen who earned his MFA from Yale and has exhibited in New York, Chicago, Marfa, Ireland and beyond, Rodriguez takes a tactile approach to small-scale “semi-figurative” paintings inspired by personal experiences and the natural world. Frequently using oddly shaped, homemade panels, he paints scenes and patterns in thick, textural layers, adding organic-looking embellishments such as stones, shells and feathers, and finishing the pieces with earthy frames rendered in found bits of wood, rope, wire and hardware accents. Bringing to mind everything from cave drawings and tribal symbology to folk and outsider art, Rodriguez’s work comes to light in “Bruisers,” his first ever solo show in Texas. Nodding to the battle scars we collect while navigating life on Earth, Rodriguez says the exhibition title also speaks to the surfaces of his paintings, many of which “undergo a lot of heavy hitting and burning and throwing across the floor.” During the opening reception, both artists will give short talks about their work and Artpace will also be rolling out a new Third Thursdays series that kicks off with a rooftop screening of shorts curated by the San Antonio Film Festival ($5-$10, 8pm Thu, May 16). (210) 212-4900

"Bruce Lee Shoes"

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through July 20
Cinnabar Art Gallery 1420 South Alamo, #147, San Antonio San Antonio


Cinnabar’s latest exhibition showcases the work of Emanuel De Sousa, a Portugese-born, London-based artist who puts a poppy spin on portraiture. In addition to nods to iconic martial artist Bruce Lee and his yellow jumpsuits, De Sousa’s latest series of paintings features porcelain dogs, mylar balloons and other objects plucked from “tiny closed universes where absurd, nonsensical realities make sense.” (210) 557-6073 (FAX); (210)

Looking for Langston

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11

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Although his resume includes writing and directing credits for the award-winning coming-of-age drama Young Soul Rebels (1991) and the blaxploitation documentary BaadAsssss Cinema (2002), British filmmaker and installation artist Isaac Julien is arguably better known for conceptual films presented on multiple screens simultaneously. Seemingly dissected and left for viewers to reassemble with their own eyes, these immersive projects have involved journeys to remote ice caves in Iceland, juxtapositions of Arctic and African landscapes, travels through China and curious collaborations with the likes of Tilda Swinton and James Franco. A co-founder of the Sankofa Film and Video Collective (an organization “dedicated to developing an independent black film culture in the areas of production, exhibition and audience”), Julien made one of his earliest waves with Looking for Langston — a 1989 film billed as “a lyrical exploration — and recreation — of the private world of poet, social activist, novelist, playwright and columnist Langston Hughes (1902-1967) and his fellow black artists and writers who formed the Harlem Renaissance during the 1920s.” In essence a non-linear homage that presents Hughes as a metaphor for the black gay experience, the film has earned cult status and is taught extensively in universities as part of African-American and queer studies programs. Appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2017, Julien was a favorite of late local artist and philanthropist Linda Pace, who acquired more than 50 of his works during her lifetime. In celebration of Looking for Langston’s 30th anniversary, the Linda Pace Foundation’s gallery Studio at Ruby City showcases the 45-minute film as the anchor of a new exhibition of two recently acquired photographs Julien shot during production — Film-Noir Angels and Masquerade No. 3.

Cactus Pear Music Festival

Fridays, Saturdays, 7-9:30 p.m. Continues through July 20
Trinity Baptist Church 319 E. Mulberry, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$5-$28


This year, several changes are in store for Cactus Pear Music Festival. As part of its search for a new Artistic Director to replace Stephanie Sant’Ambrogio, whose last season with Cactus Pear will be in 2021, the two finalists — both former winners of the San Antonio International Piano Competition (now the Gurwitz Piano Competition) — will each serve as a guest festival artist as well as guest artistic director for week two of the festival in this and next year. This summer, 2016 SAIPC Gold Medalist Scott Cuellar takes the helm, and will perform for all four main festival concerts: “Into the Twilight” (July 12), “Baying at the Moon” (July 13), “Goethe Have Music” (July 19) and “Romancing the Notes” (July 20). Cactus Pear is also introducing two free Casual Classix concerts, opening the festival with “Bulgarian Bad Boyz, Brahms and Beer” (6 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, Bar 414, 205 E. Houston) and a caffeinated matinee before the final festival concert that they’re calling “French Roast: Debussy, Ravel and Duparc” (3 p.m. Saturday, July 20, Summer Moon Coffee Bar, 3233 N. St. Mary’s St.). In addition to Cuellar and current director Sant’Ambrogio, artists on deck include members of the San Antonio Symphony such as Jeff Garza, French horn, and Ilya Shterenberg, clarinet, as well as visiting artists Carol Cook, viola; Lachezar Kostov, cello; Viktor Valkov, piano; Timothy Jones, baritone; Ellen DePasquale, violin; and more. (210) 733-6201

Roald Dahl's Matilda The Musical

Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11
The Public Theater of San Antonio 800 W. Ashby Pl., San Antonio Central

Buy Tickets$20-$45


Most fans of Roald Dahl’s Matilda can agree that the scene in which “Poor Brucey” is forced by Miss Trunbull to consume an entire, Willy Wonka-sized chocolate cake as punishment for stealing a single piece is one of the most memorable moments from the story. In the novel, the titular heroine defeats such evil with words — and telekinesis, of course — but the musical adaptation offers the chance to experience the magic in song. Born to the Wormwood family in the whirlwind of ballroom dancing with a dip and a little foxtrot, the child genius Matilda erupts from the gloom of her cruel childhood as a miracle with bravado and pizzazz. Believe it or not, Matilda actually shares the record for most Olivier awards won by a musical with Hamilton! Although Mara Wilson certainly won’t be reprising her filmic role, Matilda will spunkily take her adolescent revolution to the Public Theatre stage, played by Taylor Henderson and Audrey Davis. (210) 733-7258

Beauty and the Beast

Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., Sundays, 3 p.m. and Thu., July 25, 7 p.m. Continues through July 28
Woodlawn Theatre 1920 Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$18-$30


Based on the Academy Award-winning animated feature, The classic story tells of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped under the spell of an enchantress. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will end and he will be transformed into his former self. But time is running out. If the Beast does not learn his lesson soon, he and his household will be doomed for all eternity. (210) 267-8388

An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe

Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through July 27
The Gregg Barrios Theater at the Overtime 5409 Bandera Road, Suite 205, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$10-$15


This one-man show will take audiences into the fading mind of the acclaimed dark Romantic poet and author Edgar Allan Poe as he wanders the streets of Baltimore in his feverish final week on Earth. Written, produced and starring Derek Berlin, a native San Antonian and lifelong performer, An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe’s “macabre” look into the tortured man’s “purgatorial” musings ought to find a nice home at the Overtime Theater, best known for its penchant for the weird and its willingness to offer the stage to eclectics and their experiments. Let’s see how well Berlin’s latest project can measure up to the granddaddy of Gothic fiction himself. (210) 557-7562

The Lion King with the San Antonio Zoo

Fri., July 19, 7:30 p.m.
Alamo Drafthouse Park North 618 NW Loop 410, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$12.25


Learn about lions and chat with the experts! Before the film, San Antonio Zoo staff will break down what you're about to watch, as well as discuss the actual lions you can see in the zoo. Plus, you can add a donation to the San Antonio Zoo when you get your Lion King tickets at the checkout online. (210) 677-8500

LonDukDon is Back at The Aquaduck!

Fri., July 19, 9 p.m.-12 a.m.
The Aquaduck Beer Garden 9214 Espada Road, San Antonio South Side

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Come hang out with this group of fun-loving musicians that are dedicated to keeping the AWESOME spirit of the 80's Pop and New Wave sounds as alive and vibrant as ever! (210) 600-3280

Dale Watson

Fri., July 19, 9 p.m.
John T Floore's Country Store 14492 Old Bandera Rd., Helotes San Antonio


Floore's presents honky-tonk hero and country music maverick Dale Watson. (210) 6958827 (FAX); (210)

The Big-Little Comedy Fest

Fri., July 19, 8 & 10 p.m. and Sat., July 20, 6, 8 & 10 p.m.
Bexar Stage 1203 Camden St., San Antonio Downtown

Buy Tickets$10-$20


The Big-Little Comedy Fest is San Antonio's first comedy fest of its kind. This 4-day event will feature 30 improv, sketch, and stand-up acts from throughout Texas and as far away as Los Angeles and New Jersey. San Antonio's Bexar Stage is proud to play host to this national comedy event. (312) 971-7252

Yannis Pappas

Fri., July 19, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m., Sat., July 20, 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sun., July 21, 7:30 p.m.
Laugh Out Loud Comedy Club 618 NW Loop 410, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$17-$27


Yannis Pappas is a stand-up comedian and current host of AOL’s Original Series, 2 Point Lead. Yannis’ Half Hour Comedy Central Special aired in 2014 and is available on Amazon, iTunes, ComedyCentral.com and whenever Comedy Central re-runs it. Yannis was also the co-host of MSG’s sports fan show, The Bracket and the host of ABC’s Fusion Live on the Fusion Network. He has also been featured on AXS TV’s Gotham Comedy Live, TRUTV’s How To Be a Grown Up, VH1’s “Best Week Ever”, Good Morning America on ABC. Yannis has been part of the Just For Laughs Festival in Montreal, New York Comedy Festival and tours the world as a stand-up comedian and is known for his immensely popular charactersMr. Panos and Maurica. All his comedy shorts with Ditch Films can be found on YouTube. (210) 541-8805

Mensa

Third Friday of every month, 7:30-9 p.m.
H-E-B Central Market 4821 Broadway St, San Antonio San Antonio

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Central Market hosts a monthly Mensa gathering in the second floor meeting room. For more information contact Bob Bevard at (210) 695-2700 or bobbevard@aol.com. (210) 695-2700

Rural Charm/ Encanto Rural Gallery

Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 30
Centro Cultural Aztlan 1800 Fredericksburg #103, San Antonio San Antonio


Centro Cultural Aztlan is pleased to present Encanto Rural (Rural Charm), a two-person mixed media and assemblage exhibit by James Miller and Lenise Perez-Miller. The exhibition opens with a reception on Friday, July 12, 2019 from 6-9pm with light refreshments and music by Forged in Fire (featuring Sabrina Lopez). The exhibit is free and open to the public and will be on view 9am-5pm Monday-Friday, from Monday July, 8 through Tuesday, July 30. This exhibit is made possible by the support for the City of San Antonio: Department of Arts & Culture, Texas Commission on the Arts, and more. (210) 432-1896

Pizza a la Valeria

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-9 p.m. Continues through Sept. 4
Valeria Ristorante Italiano 109 Waterview Parkway #105, Boerne Boerne

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Dine at Valeria every Wednesday through Saturday to indulge in a delicious variety of classic wood-fired pizzas. All pizzas are hand stretched to approximately 12 inches, making them a perfect meal for one or delicious appetizer for the whole family. (830) 331-1393

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