Events This Weekend in San Antonio with Staff Pick

Loading...
  • Detail View
  • List View
  • Grid View
23 results

DOJO S.A., Send Help, Lonestar Massacre, Ammo for My Arsenal, Horus Ascending

Fri., July 26, 7 p.m.
Imagine Books and Records 8373 Culebra Rd, San Antonio San Antonio


Gather the kiddies, grab “Green Eggs & Ham” … and send the little rats to bed for post-library hours. The “Loudest Bookstore in Texas,” which hosts music nights Fridays and Saturdays, is turning its cozy venue over to four local metal bands normally seen inciting pits at clubs. Openers Horus Ascending aren’t local but hail from Kingsville. If this bill doesn’t tear the walls down, maybe you can resume reading to Junior the following day. With a plate of everyone’s favorite breakfast, of course. (210) 236-7668

National Day of the Cowboy 5

Sat., July 27, 12-4 p.m.
Briscoe Western Art Museum 210 W. Market St., San Antonio, San Antonio San Antonio


Like it or not, we’re living in a post-Internet reality populated by far-stretching “celebrations” observing everything from Dr. Seuss Day (March 2) and Wear Pajamas to Work Day (April 16) to Lima Bean Respect Day (April 20) and National Sneak Some Zucchini Onto Your Neighbor’s Porch Day (August 8). Initiated in 2005 and commemorated in Texas a decade later, the National Day of the Cowboy follows a slightly less ironic bent as a nonprofit organization dedicated to uplifting the storied culture surrounding American cowboys and pioneer heritage. Opened in 2013 with a mission to preserve the “art, history and culture of the American West,” the Briscoe Western Art Museum is rightfully at the center of the Alamo City’s kid-friendly iteration. Taking cues from “Into a New West” — a traveling exhibition comprising 50 contemporary works on loan from Georgia’s Booth Western Art Museum — this year’s affair promises “cowboy crafts,” live C&W tunes courtesy of the Barditch Hippies, costumed actors showing off their branding and roping skills, “cowpoke games” — including corn hole, panning for gold, felt horseshoes and a Nerf shooting gallery — food truck fare and adult beverages for purchase. And don’t miss the tempting opportunity to incarcerate fellow attendees in a “jail cell” until they post bail in the form of a donation to the museum. (210) 2994499; (210) (FAX)

Slightly Stoopid

Sat., July 27, 5:30 p.m.
Whitewater Amphitheater 11860 FM 306, New Braunfels New Braunfels

Buy Tickets Buy Tickets Buy Tickets Buy from TicketFly$30.02-$1,119.63


Despite having one of the worst band names of the ’90s — right up there with Hoobastank — Slightly Stoopid’s blue-eyed reggae may be the remedy when you feel the need to get mellow. Discovered by Sublime frontman Bradley Nowell, a fellow SoCal toker and sun-soaker, Slightly Stoopid has consistently released solid albums that fuse reggae with hip-hop, funk, punk and whatever else they’re feeling.

Juan Lobo Fest 2019

Sat., July 27, 6 p.m.
John T Floore's Country Store 14492 Old Bandera Rd., Helotes San Antonio


A lineup of some of the most influential musicians to call the Lone Star State home are playing in a one-night festival under the Texas sky. Expect sets from Jon Wolfe, Siggno, Rick Trevino, Jake Worthington and Los Texmaniacs. Along with catching some of our state’s most revered musicians, Juan Lobo Fest has another motive: the unveiling of Juan Lobo Tequila. (210) 6958827 (FAX); (210)

The Canción Cannibal Cabaret

Sat., July 27, 6-9 p.m.
Guadalupe Theater 1301 Guadalupe, San Antonio San Antonio


In her 2015 TEDxMcAllen Talk titled “Scaling Walls With Words,” acclaimed Tejana actor, writer, activist and spoken-word artist Amalia Ortiz compared her code-switching linguistic style to an unlikely mashup of Selena and the Sex Pistols — “like a dyslexic DJ ready to bidi bidi bomb the suburbs, punk ruca style.” She also referenced a quote from historian Howard Zinn’s book Artists in Times of War, which presents artists as catalysts who should “think outside the boundaries of permissible thought and dare to say things that no one else will say.” Taken together, those two tidbits offer a glimpse into the outspoken, genre-challenging spirit that runs through Ortiz’s diverse work, which encompasses three seasons on the HBO series Russell Simmons Presents Def Poetry, the NBC-approved poetry collection Rant. Chant. Chisme and a Tex-Mex remix of Georges Bizet’s iconic opera Carmen dubbed Carmen de la Calle. An evolution of an MFA thesis manuscript Ortiz started writing before Trump’s election, The Canción Cannibal Cabaret & Other Songs functions as a multidimensional, multipurpose endeavor. Although firstly a collection of socially conscious, political poetry that doubles as a script for a punk musical, the forthcoming Aztlan Libre Press book is also a conceptual commentary on propaganda, a love letter to the DIY aesthetics of rasquachismo, a rebuttal of performance poetry’s questionable reputation within the ranks of academia and a “refugee, people of color, feminist, and LGBTQ+ call to action.” In the book’s introduction, Ortiz explains that The Canción Cannibal Cabaret is “more than a flat manuscript of text, but rather words which claim three-dimensional space.” Set in a post-apocalyptic, “not-so-distant” future just after the establishment of a totalitarian government, The Canción Cannibal Cabaret centers around La Madre Valiente, an anti-colonial, anti-capitalist refugee secretly planning an intersectional feminist revolution with assistance from her roving emissaries, the Black Bards and Red Heralds. Human flesh, however, is not on the menu. Here the term “cannibal” refers to the cannibalization of “knowledge from before the fall of civilization” as well as Ortiz’s “homolinguistic” translations (essentially English to English reconfigurations) of songs and poems by the likes of Bob Dylan and late Chicana icon Gloria Anzaldúa — whose poem “The Cannibal’s Canción” sparked the project’s name. “If you enjoy Anzaldúa or Dylan, you might enjoy this,” Ortiz suggests. In celebration of the book’s national release on July 27, the Guadalupe Theater plays host to a free book launch and a complete performance of The Canción Cannibal Cabaret, which Ortiz describes as a “deliberately theatrical” spectacle involving costumes, makeup, choreography, stage lighting, music and video. (210) 271-3151 (FAX); (210)

Grunge Fest

Sat., July 27, 6:30 p.m.
Aztec Theatre 104 N St Mary's St, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$13-$16


Dust off your fave flannel and step back into the ’90s again with this trio of tribute acts dedicated to three of the bands that defined the grunge genre. The spirits of Kurt Cobain, Chris Cornell and Scott Weiland are sure to rain down on the Aztec and have it smelling like teen spirit for all ages long before “Black Hole Sun” and “Wicked Garden” blaze your ears. (210) 812-4355

Seth Shaw Quartet

Sat., July 27, 8 p.m.
Bar 301 23567 W. Interstate 10, San Antonio Far North


Don’t let the name fool you. Shaw may show up with three, four or five bandmates. But, hey, the more the merrier, since Shaw and company’s style of jazz and swing simultaneously soothes to the core while getting folks out of their chairs and strutting. Shaw has also been known to play private events. Maybe he’ll even take a few requests.

John Leguizamo’s Latin History for Morons

Sat., July 27, 8-10 p.m.
The Majestic Theatre 224 E Houston, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy from Ticketmaster$39.50-$215


Maybe college students would actually roll out of bed for those 8 a.m. classes if actor, comedian and all-around Renaissance man John Leguizamo was their history professor. In his one-man Broadway show Latin History for Morons, which earned a Special Tony Award last year, Leguizamo, who stars in the recent Netflix mini-series When They See Us, makes it his mission to squeeze 3,000 years of Latin history into a single, 90-minute lesson — “from conquistadores to cumbia” and “Montezuma to menudo.” Leguizamo was inspired to write the show after he learned his shy 8th grade son was being bullied at school for being brown. “How is it that my son is going through the same racial rites of passage I did?” he asks. “In order to help my son, I realized I was going to have to get to the root of my problem — feeling like a second-class citizen.” While Latin History for Morons can currently be seen on Netflix, we’re sure watching Leguizamo perform in person is an entirely different experience. It’s an important message of inclusion, so listen up and take notes. (210) 226-3333

Project Rogue, Cadavers, Bluntsplitter and More

Sat., July 27, 9:30 p.m.
Zombies 4202 Thousand Oaks, San Antonio San Antonio


A bevy of regional and local talent including DFW’s Project Rogue will take the stage for a night of hot active rock in the Northside suburbs.

Anuel AA

Sun., July 28, 7 p.m.
Freeman Coliseum 3201 E Houston, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy from Ticketmaster$51-$327


If you’re a fan of Latin rap and haven’t heard of Anuel AA yet, it’s time to catch up. The Puerto Rican rapper won the 2019 Billboard Latin Music Award for Best New Artist and is a heavy player in the bonkers Latin trap scene. The multitalented artist — he can sing too — dropped his first and, so far, only album Real Hasta la Muerte in 2018 and has appeared on songs with the likes of Daddy Yankee, 6ix9ine and Bad Bunny. While Anuel AA’s music is easy to bump to, it also deals in a deadpan manner with themes of violence, drugs and sex — you know, the important things in life. For those who haven’t fully grasped the Latin-charged sea change occurring in hip-hop, an Anuel AA show may be an opportunity to wake up to that cultural shift. (210) 226-1177

Mary Poppins Jr. The Broadway Musical

Fri., July 26, 7 p.m., Sat., July 27, 3 & 7 p.m. and Sun., July 28, 3 p.m.
Tobin Center for the Performing Arts 100 Auditorium Circle, San Antonio River Walk

,
Lose yourself in one of the most beloved stories of all time as the Tobin Center transforms into turn-of-the-century England, when young and mischievous Jane and Michael Banks meet their match in Mary Poppins. Watch as the siblings and their father learn to become a family again with the help of a whimsical nanny, who uses charm, wit and a bit of magic to teach timeless life lessons. Practically perfect in every way, this musical will sweep children and adults alike off their feet. As Mary Poppins says, anything can happen if you let it, so let yourself spend an enchanting evening with the Banks. (210) 223-8624

26th Annual Balcones Heights Jazz Festival

Fri., July 26, 7:30-10 p.m. and Fri., Aug. 2, 7:30-10 p.m.
Wonderland of the Americas Amphitheatre 4522 Fredericksburg Rd., San Antonio San Antonio

,
For fans of smooth jazz in San Antonio and beyond, the Balcones Heights Jazz Festival is an institution at this point. The free festival, now in its 26th year, consistently offers up some of the best regional talent in the ear-candy subgenre. This year, the event organizers expect, based on previous numbers, to welcome more than 4,000 festival-goers over the course of the four Fridays of the fest. The latest installment of the quirky festival has the unique distinction of featuring an all-woman lineup — a rarity for any genre of music, really — for the very first time. Festival organizer Lorenzo Nastasi said in a press release that the idea to go all-woman this year was inspired by, and in part to be understood as a celebration of, the many women in leadership positions in Balcones Heights. It’s ultimately an admirable and exciting move by the organizers. Slated performers are Wednesday Ball and Ragan Whiteside (July 12), MiChelle Garibay-Carey and Jessy J (July 19), Elizabeth Mis and Jeanette Harris (July 26) and Kayla Waters and Lindsey Webster (August 2). Each performer will, as per tradition, get more than an hour of stage time.

Mozart Festival Texas 2019

Sat., July 27, 8-10 p.m., Sun., July 28, 3-5 p.m., Sat., Aug. 3, 8-10 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 4, 3-5 p.m.
UIW Concert Hall 4301 Broadway, San Antonio Downtown

Buy Tickets$15-$115

, ,
@ University of The Incarnate Word Concert Hall, 4301 Broadway St. San Antonio, Texas. 78209
San Antonio’s homegrown festival of (mostly) Mozart music celebrates its 10th anniversary with four concerts at the University of the Incarnate Word. While most of the concerts focus on our man Wolfgang Amadeus’ greatest hits — from the Don Giovanni Overture to the Divertimento for Strings in D — works by Johann Sebastian Bach, Franz Haydn, Claude Debussy and Jaques Ibert will also be featured. This year’s guest performers include Caleb Polachek, Bruce Williams, Megan Meisenbach, Elaine Barber, Toby Blumenthal, Richard Kilmer and Douglas Harvey, with a final concert capped off by a performance of Mozart’s Piano Concerto no. 17 in G by 2016 San Antonio International Piano Competition Bronze Medalist Osip Nikiforov.

San Antonio Nerd Night

Fourth Sunday of every month, 2-10 p.m.
Knight Watch Games 16350 Blanco Road, San Antonio North Central


Gamers converge the fourth Sunday of every month for a meetup benefiting area nonprofits. (214) 641-9352

Men of Steel, Women of Wonder

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 1
San Antonio Museum of Art 200 W. Jones Ave., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$12-$20


Evidenced by the global success of recent films such as Black Panther, Avengers: Endgame and Captain Marvel, among many others, the world is still captivated by the concept of superheroes. While less memorable examples might fall within that formulaic realm the New York Times summed up as “mental popcorn, meant to be rapidly consumed and forgotten,” the box office numbers prove we’re still collectively content to sit and watch statuesque freaks of nature fight off evil forces — even when the takeaway is minimal. Long before the schlock of what’s been dubbed “Hollywood’s Comic Book Age,” Superman and Wonder Woman captured imaginations as defenders of humanity fighting injustices amid the backdrops of the Great Depression and WWII. Introduced in 1938 and 1941, respectively, this iconic, spandex-clad pair inspire myriad incarnations in “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder,” an exhibition organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, and landing at the San Antonio Museum of Art this summer. Although it might conjure visions of comic cons and nerdy fan art, the traveling show digs deep into the cultural significance of both figures — and it isn’t an entirely kid-friendly affair. Curated by Alejo Benedetti, the collection of 70-plus paintings, photographs, videos and installations goes beyond the expected depictions of costumed heroism to explore sexuality, immigration, race, idolatry, desire and the very building blocks that made these characters possible. Spanning from the 1930s to the present day, “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder” builds an interpretive timeline in four thematic sections. Encompassing both the reverent and irreverent, the introductory section The Heroes We Know comprises photographer Siri Kaur’s amusing portraits of celebrity impersonators captured in mundane, contemporary contexts, Peter Saul’s playfully surreal painting Superman Versus the Toilet Duck and a provocative yet nostalgic installation by Jim Shaw, The Issue of My Loins, that showcases — and supersizes — Superman’s crotch. Placing the mythical stars in historical context, Origin Stories is reportedly the germinating seed for the entire exhibition. Here, real-life men of steel and women of wonder are presented in etchings of 1930s-era steel workers building the metropolis, photographs of women welding in the Willow Run bomber plant in the 1940s and Norman Rockwell’s 1943 painting of brawny machinist and feminist icon Rosie the Riveter eating a sandwich as the American flag billows in the background. Contrasting God-like power with traces of vulnerability, Glimpsing Humanity places our heroes in unexpected contexts: an alienated Superman reads the paper amid a barren landscape in Llyn Foulkes’ 1991 painting Where Did I Go Wrong and gets lit in Mike Kelley’s 1999 video Superman Recites Selections from “The Bell Jar” and Other Works by Sylvia Plath. Wonder Woman becomes a religious icon in Valetin Popov’s 2009 painting St. Wonder Woman and gets placed In Exile alongside the Virgin Mary, Aphrodite and others in Mary Beth Edelson’s mixed-media painting from 1989. Timely and provocative, the closing section Defender of the Innocent challenges stereotypes of gender and race while importantly reminding that both beloved characters are immigrants (he’s from Krypton, she’s from Themyscira, aka Paradise Island). Sarah Hill addresses the plight of a trans Wonder Woman in the 2014 video They Wonder; late San Antonio artist Mel Casas calls out the lack of diversity in the superhero realm in his painting Humanscape 70 (Comic Whitewash); Superman locks lips with Batman in Rich Simmons’ 2014 mixed-media work Between the Capes; Dulce Pinzón celebrates Mexican immigrants as working-class superheroes in staged photographs; and an installation attributed to the U.S. Department of Illegal Superheroes (ICE DISH) comes complete with a hotline where concerned citizens can report suspicious activity. As host venue, SAMA rises to the heroic occasion with an abundance of complementary programs, including talks with featured artists, weekly gallery talks, workshops, a Superhero Pajama Party (July 26) and outdoor screenings of Black Panther (June 28), Superman: The Movie (July 12), Nacho Libre (July 19), The Incredibles 2 (August 2), Batman (August 6), Wonder Woman (August 9), Birdman (August 16), Lu Over the Wall (August 23) and Superman II (August 30). (210) 978-8100

Juana Córdova, Francis Almendárez, Narcissister

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 8
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


The latest round of Artpace's International Artist-in-Residence program demands to be heard as much as seen. Each of the artists elected by guest curator Karina Aguilera Skvirsky has created visually distinct and seemingly disparate bodies of work, but the exhibitions are united by the presence of sound. For "Chronicles of Uprooting," Juana Córdova (Cuenca, Ecuador) collected samples of tumbleweed, an immigrant plant that made its way to the American West via a shipment of flaxseed from Russia, and achiote seeds, a plant common to the tropics of Latin America that has been used to give flavor and color to food, cosmetics and textiles since the Pre-Columbian era. The space is filled with a gentle droning, provided both by fans that keep three tumbleweeds spinning aloft in transparent tubes and a video installation featuring the frenetic movement of insects. From the winding roads of flattened tumbleweed unspooled on the wall to a diaspora of achiote seeds mounted in a corner, Córdova renders the journeys of immigrant peoples in miniature, metaphorically connecting the movement of flora to human migration worldwide. Francis Almendárez (Houston) focuses on the rhythms of work both commercial and domestic in "rhythm and (p)leisure." Shot in Honduras and El Salvador, the multi-screen video installation is abuzz with the myriad sounds of human tasks, whether it be a man hammering the soles of counterfeit Nike sneakers, a woman gently sweeping a tile floor or a group drumming on a street corner. From the rushed pace of the city to the more leisurely speed of the countryside, Almendárez has captured the processes of human work, both material and immaterial, and reveals how even activities we view as leisure are still "work" in their own right. Piles of clothes on pallets offer the viewer a place to sit or recline, but this is merely a brief respite before the garments reenter the global circulation of sale, resale and disposal. Masked artist Narcissister (New York, New York) is a provocateur whose performance art has been seen in venues from burlesque clubs to America's Got Talent. While functionally silent, the bombastic imagery of the erotic collages included in "Wimmin" are loud in their own way, unapologetically confronting the intersection of femininity, race and sexuality. However, the artist's work also possesses an auditory component that arises when pieces are "activated" (a term she isn't particularly fond of) in performance. During the free opening reception, performances will cycle every half hour, featuring small gestures such as the swishing of the fabric of a formal dress as it's wrapped around a body encased in a bale of aluminum cans and the echoing clank of the pan-eyelids of an assembled face being opened by an anonymous performer, who completes the structure's features with a large, pierced nose worn on her back. (210) 212-4900

"Transcendental Tricentennial: Love Letters to San Anto, the (he)Art of David Zamora Casas"

Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through July 28
Institute of Texan Cultures 801 E César Chávez Blvd, San Antonio San Antonio

, ,
Over the last four decades, self-described “artivist” David Zamora Casas has delighted, shocked and intrigued San Antonio audiences with paintings, installations, altars and performance works that essentially present the artist himself as a canvas. Fusing elements of folk and outsider art with nods to the aesthetics of Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí, the DIY spirit of rasquachismo, religious iconography and Latinx and LGBTQ* activism, Casas has established something many artists strive for fruitlessly: an instantly recognizable aesthetic that’s distinctly their own. Nicknamed Nuclear Meltdown and dubbed a “clown shaman” by esteemed author and MacArthur Genius Sandra Cisneros, Casas often makes cameos in his own paintings, his fire-engine red lips, devilish goatee and Dalí-esque mustache emerging from surreal tableaus populated by skulls, deities, monkeys and mermaids swimming amid swirling patterns, Mesoamerican symbols and hand-painted text reminiscent of retablos. In the words of Chicano art specialist Tomas Ybarra-Frausto, Casas’ canvases “mix word and image to visualize autobiographical and universal stories  of homoerotic love, loss and persistent social concerns including immigration, environmental plunder, gender disparity and the multiple issues facing marginalized individuals and communities.” Billed as an artistic explosion of “folk-baroque manifestations” exploring themes ranging from indigenous history to gender fluidity, Casas’ new solo show “Transcendental Tricentennial” comprises “miles of ribbon, yards of fabric, embellished prints, various on-site assemblages, oil and acrylic paintings on canvas, barbed-wire and bone sculptures, and a Día de los Muertos ofrenda which spills into our collective consciousness.” Made possible by a grant from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), the “mega-installation” also involves creative collaborations with the likes of accordion queen Eva Ybarra and video/film producers Laura Varela and Fadela Gacis Castro. As for its slightly unexpected landing at the Institute of Texan Cultures, Casas reminds that the exhibition evokes the ITC’s mission to be “a lesson in diversity [that] shows the uniqueness and beauty of the many cultures that came to Texas.” (210) 458-2300

Daniel Rios Rodriguez & Raul Gonzalez

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 18
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


With a powerful trio of exhibitions already on view, Artpace gives us two more reasons to visit this spring with the unveiling of new projects by San Antonio-based artists Daniel Rios Rodriguez and Raul Gonzalez. Although Rodriguez and Gonzalez explore wildly different topics and themes, their bright and bold bodies of work find common ground in playful energy, DIY aesthetics and transformations of commonplace materials. A Houston transplant who earned an MFA from UTSA along with grants from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, the Surdna Foundation and the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), Gonzalez has long been fixated on the concept of work in many forms — construction, manual labor and his dual roles as a “werking artist” and undeniably cool stay-at-home dad. He’s captured the everyday joys of fatherhood in figurative drawings, celebrated his love for Whataburger and the Houston Astros in paintings and installations, enhanced his exhibitions with energetic, movement-based performances and even danced for 4.3 miles — continuously from downtown to the McNay. With a title lifted from a song by bygone Texas hip-hop duo UGK, his “Front and Back, and Side to Side” promises to transform Artpace’s Main Space windows with a “multi-dimensional mural” rendered in cardboard and colored duct tape. (Cue the selfies). A native of Killeen who earned his MFA from Yale and has exhibited in New York, Chicago, Marfa, Ireland and beyond, Rodriguez takes a tactile approach to small-scale “semi-figurative” paintings inspired by personal experiences and the natural world. Frequently using oddly shaped, homemade panels, he paints scenes and patterns in thick, textural layers, adding organic-looking embellishments such as stones, shells and feathers, and finishing the pieces with earthy frames rendered in found bits of wood, rope, wire and hardware accents. Bringing to mind everything from cave drawings and tribal symbology to folk and outsider art, Rodriguez’s work comes to light in “Bruisers,” his first ever solo show in Texas. Nodding to the battle scars we collect while navigating life on Earth, Rodriguez says the exhibition title also speaks to the surfaces of his paintings, many of which “undergo a lot of heavy hitting and burning and throwing across the floor.” During the opening reception, both artists will give short talks about their work and Artpace will also be rolling out a new Third Thursdays series that kicks off with a rooftop screening of shorts curated by the San Antonio Film Festival ($5-$10, 8pm Thu, May 16). (210) 212-4900

Looking for Langston

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11

,
Although his resume includes writing and directing credits for the award-winning coming-of-age drama Young Soul Rebels (1991) and the blaxploitation documentary BaadAsssss Cinema (2002), British filmmaker and installation artist Isaac Julien is arguably better known for conceptual films presented on multiple screens simultaneously. Seemingly dissected and left for viewers to reassemble with their own eyes, these immersive projects have involved journeys to remote ice caves in Iceland, juxtapositions of Arctic and African landscapes, travels through China and curious collaborations with the likes of Tilda Swinton and James Franco. A co-founder of the Sankofa Film and Video Collective (an organization “dedicated to developing an independent black film culture in the areas of production, exhibition and audience”), Julien made one of his earliest waves with Looking for Langston — a 1989 film billed as “a lyrical exploration — and recreation — of the private world of poet, social activist, novelist, playwright and columnist Langston Hughes (1902-1967) and his fellow black artists and writers who formed the Harlem Renaissance during the 1920s.” In essence a non-linear homage that presents Hughes as a metaphor for the black gay experience, the film has earned cult status and is taught extensively in universities as part of African-American and queer studies programs. Appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2017, Julien was a favorite of late local artist and philanthropist Linda Pace, who acquired more than 50 of his works during her lifetime. In celebration of Looking for Langston’s 30th anniversary, the Linda Pace Foundation’s gallery Studio at Ruby City showcases the 45-minute film as the anchor of a new exhibition of two recently acquired photographs Julien shot during production — Film-Noir Angels and Masquerade No. 3.

Beauty and the Beast

Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., Sundays, 3 p.m. and Thu., July 25, 7 p.m. Continues through July 28
Woodlawn Theatre 1920 Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$18-$30


Based on the Academy Award-winning animated feature, The classic story tells of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped under the spell of an enchantress. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will end and he will be transformed into his former self. But time is running out. If the Beast does not learn his lesson soon, he and his household will be doomed for all eternity. (210) 267-8388

Roald Dahl's Matilda The Musical

Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11
The Public Theater of San Antonio 800 W. Ashby Pl., San Antonio Central

Buy Tickets$20-$45


Most fans of Roald Dahl’s Matilda can agree that the scene in which “Poor Brucey” is forced by Miss Trunbull to consume an entire, Willy Wonka-sized chocolate cake as punishment for stealing a single piece is one of the most memorable moments from the story. In the novel, the titular heroine defeats such evil with words — and telekinesis, of course — but the musical adaptation offers the chance to experience the magic in song. Born to the Wormwood family in the whirlwind of ballroom dancing with a dip and a little foxtrot, the child genius Matilda erupts from the gloom of her cruel childhood as a miracle with bravado and pizzazz. Believe it or not, Matilda actually shares the record for most Olivier awards won by a musical with Hamilton! Although Mara Wilson certainly won’t be reprising her filmic role, Matilda will spunkily take her adolescent revolution to the Public Theatre stage, played by Taylor Henderson and Audrey Davis. (210) 733-7258

An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe

Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through July 27
The Gregg Barrios Theater at the Overtime 5409 Bandera Road, Suite 205, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$10-$15


This one-man show will take audiences into the fading mind of the acclaimed dark Romantic poet and author Edgar Allan Poe as he wanders the streets of Baltimore in his feverish final week on Earth. Written, produced and starring Derek Berlin, a native San Antonian and lifelong performer, An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe’s “macabre” look into the tortured man’s “purgatorial” musings ought to find a nice home at the Overtime Theater, best known for its penchant for the weird and its willingness to offer the stage to eclectics and their experiments. Let’s see how well Berlin’s latest project can measure up to the granddaddy of Gothic fiction himself. (210) 557-7562

Marlon Wayans

Sundays, 7:30 p.m., Sun., July 28, 9:45 p.m. and Mon., July 29, 7 & 9:30 p.m. Continues through July 28
Laugh Out Loud Comedy Club 618 NW Loop 410, San Antonio San Antonio


The LOL Comedy Club should book actor and comedian Marlon Wayans every single weekend from now until eternity — whatever will keep him too busy to make a sequel to his embarrassingly unfunny 2004 comedy White Chicks. Those rumors picked up steam late last month when co-star Terry Crews went on Watch What Happens Live with Andy Cohen and said, “Man, we’re doing it,” when asked about a possible sequel. Wayans quickly jumped on social media to do some cleanup and say the pair “still don’t have a deal in place.” Aside from that awful idea, Wayans has at least one good one in the works. He was cast in a new adventure dramedy (On the Rocks) helmed by Oscar-winning writer and Oscar-nominated director Sofia Coppola (Lost in Translation). The film stars Wayans, Rashida Jones, Jenny Slate and Oscar-nominee Bill Murray. Oh, then there’s that upcoming Netflix movie (Sextuplets) where he dresses up like an overweight lady á la Eddie Murphy in Norbit. We were going to say that maybe he’d have better luck with latex, but then we remembered what he looked like in White Chicks. (210) 541-8805

Calendar

Newsletters

Never miss a beat

Sign Up Now

Subscribe now to get the latest news delivered right to your inbox.

© 2019 San Antonio Current

Website powered by Foundation