Events in San Antonio with Staff Pick

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WWE Presents NXT LIVE!

Thu., June 20, 6 p.m.
Aztec Theatre 104 N St Mary's St, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$24-$54


When World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) decided to expand its brand in 2010 by forming NXT, a developmental branch of the league for young talent who were not yet ready for primetime, the professional wrestling behemoth, owned and operated by CEO Vince McMahon, had no idea how popular it would become in less than a decade. Starting off as a seasonal TV competition, WWE revised the format of the show and transformed NXT into a flagship program for its own brand, which is produced by the WWE and airs on the WWE Network every Wednesday at 7 p.m. Since then, NXT has been lauded by wrestling pundits and fans around the world. In 2014, Grantland.com, a well respected but now defunct sports and culture website run by ESPN, called NXT “the way pro wrestling should be.” Today, NXT still features those up-and-coming wrestlers who are hungry for a shot at making it to the center of a WWE ring. Wrestling-loving San Antonians will get a chance to see some of the in action when the #NXTRoadTrip makes a stop downtown. (210) 812-4355

Matt & Sylvia Kirk

Thu., June 20, 7 p.m.
River Road Icehouse 1791 Hueco Springs Loop Road, New Braunfels San Antonio


This acoustic duo, which soldiered on after having its gear stolen in 2017, calls the Ice House its musical home the third Thursday of every month. (830) 626-1335

Paleta Palooza II

Thu., June 20, 7 p.m.
Paper Tiger 2410 N. St. Mary's St., San Antonio St. Mary's strip

Buy from TicketFly$5


Back again with a vengeance — well, maybe more popsicles then vengeance — Paper Tiger hosts Paleta Palooza II, which features a myriad of talent from the ever blossoming lo-fi/bedroom pop/indie rock scene. Performers will include Baldemar, Elnuh, The Cold Tonys and Sleep Well.

Kyle Moon & The Misled

Thu., June 20, 8 p.m.
The Amp Room 2407 N St. Mary's, San Antonio St. Mary's strip


Get your slide guitar and country on — plus a little rock ’n’ roll flair — courtesy of this veteran Amp Room outfit. The band’s leader, a former native of Denver, took a leap of faith by moving to the Alamo City and meeting the musicians that comprise the rest of his current outfit. (210) 320-2122

Video Dungeon Theatre: Hedwig and the Angry Inch

Thu., June 20, 9 p.m.
Oak Hills Tavern 7920 Fredericksburg Rd, San Antonio San Antonio


A botched sex change operation obtained in pursuit of an escape from behind the Iron Curtain set Hedwig (then “Hansel Schmidt”) on an unstoppable trajectory that somehow lead to her serving punk rock realness in a chain of failing restaurants called “Bilgewater’s” (with a name like that, is it any surprise they’re always empty?). Originally performed as a musical, show-creator John Cameron Mitchell adapted Hedwig’s story into a 2001 film, starring alongside some of his original off-Broadway cast members, including Miriam Shor. Between Hedwig’s trademark feathered wig, the catchy and poignant tunes on the soundtrack and costumes that are still on point today, it’s no wonder that this rock opera remains popular almost 20 years later. Video Dungeon Theatre’s special screening of Hedwig and the Angry Inch will feature a bonus performance after the film by members of the Texas Light Opera, whose production of the original musical opens in July. (210) 614-8855

“I’m Simply Missing the Mountains”

Thu., June 20, 12-5 p.m., Fri., June 21, 12-5 p.m. and Sat., June 22, 12-5 p.m.
Terminal 136 136 Blue Star, San Antonio Southtown


Mir fehlen einfach die Berge (I Am Simply Missing the Mountains) is an exhibition by three young German artists Anna Bläser, Veronica Moroder and Lukas Picard. The works selected and developed for the Terminal 136 gallery, incorporate thoughts on both real and imaginary journeys and places. They investigate the relation between the outside world and the intimate world and wonder how one influences and shapes the other. (210) 458-4391

The Play That Goes Wrong

Thu., June 20, 7:30 p.m., Fri., June 21, 8 p.m., Sat., June 22, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., June 23, 2 p.m.
The Majestic Theatre 224 E Houston, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy from Ticketmaster$25-$241


When the Cornley Polytechnic Drama Society decides to stage a performance of The Murder at Haversham Manor, they soon discover that it should have been titled Murphy’s Major Murder Mystery, as everything that could possibly go awry, does. Thus opens The Play That Goes Wrong, a slapdash comedy that follows the hapless antics of a fictitious troupe of actors and their long-suffering stage crew as they all try, and spectacularly fail, to perform their parts. Misplaced props, sticking doors and missed lines and cues are only the start of their problems as the production literally disintegrates onstage. The British farce premiered in London in 2012, but it was five years before it hopped the Atlantic to make its debut on Broadway, where it nabbed two Tonys for outstanding set design. (210) 226-3333

“America on Stage”

Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through June 30
McNay Art Museum 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


Arguably one of the most overlooked aspects of the McNay is the the museum’s impressive Tobin Collection of Theatre Arts, which boasts more than 12,00o objects spanning from the 1500s to the present day. Built around a sprawling gift from late collector, philanthropist, theater patron and design enthusiast Robert L.B. Tobin and expanded by curators Linda Hardberger and Jody Blake, the collection encompasses rare books, small-scale models, costume illustrations and stage designs created by modern masters such as Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. Organized by Head of Curatorial Affairs René Paul Barilleaux and Curatorial Assistant Timothy Retzloff, the recently opened exhibition “America on Stage” aims to celebrate “the vision of the nation’s 20th- and 21st-century master designers on stages across the U.S. and around the world.” Exploring four key themes — Broadway, Nostalgia, Breaking Tradition, and Social Justice — the show combines maquettes from productions of Cabaret, In the Heights, West Side Story and You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown; a pop-up theater where guests can view scenes from a conceptual revival of Spring Awakening; and interactive areas that invite museum-goers to “take center stage in a recreated stage set — and even tap dance.” (210) 824-5368

The State of Hand Stitch, New Embroidery by Texas Artists

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Continues through Aug. 9
UTSA Art Gallery - Main Campus One UTSA Circle, San Antonio San Antonio


"The State of Hand Stitch" is a survey of eleven women artists in Texas working with thread and needle at a time when embroidery is increasingly recognized as a medium of choice by serious artists. This exhibit displays a range of subject matter, scale, approach, and materials, demonstrating the many possibilities of contemporary stitch. (210) 458-4391

"Transcendental Tricentennial: Love Letters to San Anto, the (he)Art of David Zamora Casas"

Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through July 28
Institute of Texan Cultures 801 E César Chávez Blvd, San Antonio San Antonio

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Over the last four decades, self-described “artivist” David Zamora Casas has delighted, shocked and intrigued San Antonio audiences with paintings, installations, altars and performance works that essentially present the artist himself as a canvas. Fusing elements of folk and outsider art with nods to the aesthetics of Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí, the DIY spirit of rasquachismo, religious iconography and Latinx and LGBTQ* activism, Casas has established something many artists strive for fruitlessly: an instantly recognizable aesthetic that’s distinctly their own. Nicknamed Nuclear Meltdown and dubbed a “clown shaman” by esteemed author and MacArthur Genius Sandra Cisneros, Casas often makes cameos in his own paintings, his fire-engine red lips, devilish goatee and Dalí-esque mustache emerging from surreal tableaus populated by skulls, deities, monkeys and mermaids swimming amid swirling patterns, Mesoamerican symbols and hand-painted text reminiscent of retablos. In the words of Chicano art specialist Tomas Ybarra-Frausto, Casas’ canvases “mix word and image to visualize autobiographical and universal stories  of homoerotic love, loss and persistent social concerns including immigration, environmental plunder, gender disparity and the multiple issues facing marginalized individuals and communities.” Billed as an artistic explosion of “folk-baroque manifestations” exploring themes ranging from indigenous history to gender fluidity, Casas’ new solo show “Transcendental Tricentennial” comprises “miles of ribbon, yards of fabric, embellished prints, various on-site assemblages, oil and acrylic paintings on canvas, barbed-wire and bone sculptures, and a Día de los Muertos ofrenda which spills into our collective consciousness.” Made possible by a grant from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), the “mega-installation” also involves creative collaborations with the likes of accordion queen Eva Ybarra and video/film producers Laura Varela and Fadela Gacis Castro. As for its slightly unexpected landing at the Institute of Texan Cultures, Casas reminds that the exhibition evokes the ITC’s mission to be “a lesson in diversity [that] shows the uniqueness and beauty of the many cultures that came to Texas.” (210) 458-2300

Daniel Rios Rodriguez & Raul Gonzalez

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 18
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


With a powerful trio of exhibitions already on view, Artpace gives us two more reasons to visit this spring with the unveiling of new projects by San Antonio-based artists Daniel Rios Rodriguez and Raul Gonzalez. Although Rodriguez and Gonzalez explore wildly different topics and themes, their bright and bold bodies of work find common ground in playful energy, DIY aesthetics and transformations of commonplace materials. A Houston transplant who earned an MFA from UTSA along with grants from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, the Surdna Foundation and the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), Gonzalez has long been fixated on the concept of work in many forms — construction, manual labor and his dual roles as a “werking artist” and undeniably cool stay-at-home dad. He’s captured the everyday joys of fatherhood in figurative drawings, celebrated his love for Whataburger and the Houston Astros in paintings and installations, enhanced his exhibitions with energetic, movement-based performances and even danced for 4.3 miles — continuously from downtown to the McNay. With a title lifted from a song by bygone Texas hip-hop duo UGK, his “Front and Back, and Side to Side” promises to transform Artpace’s Main Space windows with a “multi-dimensional mural” rendered in cardboard and colored duct tape. (Cue the selfies). A native of Killeen who earned his MFA from Yale and has exhibited in New York, Chicago, Marfa, Ireland and beyond, Rodriguez takes a tactile approach to small-scale “semi-figurative” paintings inspired by personal experiences and the natural world. Frequently using oddly shaped, homemade panels, he paints scenes and patterns in thick, textural layers, adding organic-looking embellishments such as stones, shells and feathers, and finishing the pieces with earthy frames rendered in found bits of wood, rope, wire and hardware accents. Bringing to mind everything from cave drawings and tribal symbology to folk and outsider art, Rodriguez’s work comes to light in “Bruisers,” his first ever solo show in Texas. Nodding to the battle scars we collect while navigating life on Earth, Rodriguez says the exhibition title also speaks to the surfaces of his paintings, many of which “undergo a lot of heavy hitting and burning and throwing across the floor.” During the opening reception, both artists will give short talks about their work and Artpace will also be rolling out a new Third Thursdays series that kicks off with a rooftop screening of shorts curated by the San Antonio Film Festival ($5-$10, 8pm Thu, May 16). (210) 212-4900

Nate Cassie and Constance Lowe: Minding the Gaps

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through July 13
Ruiz-Healy Art 201-A E. Olmos Dr., San Antonio San Antonio


Although its title might conjure the sights and sounds of crowded London Underground stations, Ruiz-Healy Art’s new exhibition “Minding the Gaps” is not an artistic exploration of railway safety. Rather than addressing the potentially life-threatening distances between subway platforms and train cars, the gaps to be mindful of here are substantially more conceptual in nature. Blurring the boundaries between figuration and abstraction, form and function, the two-person show examines domesticity, permutation and perception while pairing sculptural works by mixed-media artists Nate Cassie and Constance Lowe. A New Jersey native who earned an MFA from UTSA and has exhibited at Artpace, the McNay and Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., Cassie works between drawing, painting, sculpture, video and digital media. While his previous bodies of work have taken shape in abstract woodblock prints named after flowers, architectural birdhouses and etchings of spindly Texas trees, Cassie’s recent output falls within the realm of functional ceramics. While not immediately clear from their earthy finishes and organic imperfections, his almost ancient-looking jugs, cups and bottles reference hard-to-define “spaces in between” and the “gaps that distance surface from volume, skin and structure, formal and intuitive systems.” Missouri-born Lowe earned an MFA from Western Michigan University, has shown at the Southwest School of Art and the Phoenix Art Museum and, like Cassie, is an alum of Artpace’s International Artist-in-Residence program. Although perhaps better known for geometric abstractions that fuse elements of photography and fiber art, Lowe also pushes her work into a sculptural realm with curious objects that suggest interventions on furniture or household decor. Whether combining calfskin, vinyl, felt, wood, mirrors or hardware, her three-dimensional pieces often draw inspiration from her family’s history of Midwestern farming. As for the “gaps” in question, they reveal themselves in the context of Lowe’s interest in “the abstraction of farmland as seen from the air” — and specifically the painterly photographs of the Earth captured by NASA’s Landsat satellite. (210) 804-2219

Looking for Langston

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11

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Although his resume includes writing and directing credits for the award-winning coming-of-age drama Young Soul Rebels (1991) and the blaxploitation documentary BaadAsssss Cinema (2002), British filmmaker and installation artist Isaac Julien is arguably better known for conceptual films presented on multiple screens simultaneously. Seemingly dissected and left for viewers to reassemble with their own eyes, these immersive projects have involved journeys to remote ice caves in Iceland, juxtapositions of Arctic and African landscapes, travels through China and curious collaborations with the likes of Tilda Swinton and James Franco. A co-founder of the Sankofa Film and Video Collective (an organization “dedicated to developing an independent black film culture in the areas of production, exhibition and audience”), Julien made one of his earliest waves with Looking for Langston — a 1989 film billed as “a lyrical exploration — and recreation — of the private world of poet, social activist, novelist, playwright and columnist Langston Hughes (1902-1967) and his fellow black artists and writers who formed the Harlem Renaissance during the 1920s.” In essence a non-linear homage that presents Hughes as a metaphor for the black gay experience, the film has earned cult status and is taught extensively in universities as part of African-American and queer studies programs. Appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2017, Julien was a favorite of late local artist and philanthropist Linda Pace, who acquired more than 50 of his works during her lifetime. In celebration of Looking for Langston’s 30th anniversary, the Linda Pace Foundation’s gallery Studio at Ruby City showcases the 45-minute film as the anchor of a new exhibition of two recently acquired photographs Julien shot during production — Film-Noir Angels and Masquerade No. 3.

"Bruce Lee Shoes"

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through July 20
Cinnabar Art Gallery 1420 South Alamo, #147, San Antonio San Antonio


Cinnabar’s latest exhibition showcases the work of Emanuel De Sousa, a Portugese-born, London-based artist who puts a poppy spin on portraiture. In addition to nods to iconic martial artist Bruce Lee and his yellow jumpsuits, De Sousa’s latest series of paintings features porcelain dogs, mylar balloons and other objects plucked from “tiny closed universes where absurd, nonsensical realities make sense.” (210) 557-6073 (FAX); (210)

Sink, Florida, Sink

Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through June 30
The Public Theater of San Antonio 800 W. Ashby Pl., San Antonio Central

Buy Tickets$10-$35


A new play has risen from the depths and washed ashore at The Public Theater. As part of The Public’s Fresh Ink program, Shannon Jarrell-Ivey directs the world premiere of David Kimple’s near-future, semi-apocalyptic drama Sink, Florida, Sink. In the face of a 12th successive hurricane (climate change much?), Violet (Alyx Irene Gonzales), Sebastian (Ivan A. Ortega) and the other remaining residents of coastal hamlet Cocoa Beach must fight to keep their heads above water in more ways than one. While doing everything they can to keep their home afloat, Violet and Sebastian must confront a whole other storm when a mysterious stranger from their past reappears in town. Truly, in Cocoa Beach, it’s not just the hurricane-force winds you have to weather. (210) 733-7258

Art to Lunch

Every third Thursday, 12:30-1 p.m.
San Antonio Museum of Art 200 W. Jones Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


Ideal for art enthusiasts with tight schedules and/or short attention spans, SAMA’s Art to Lunch series invites guests on a short-and-sweet two-object tour of works they might have overlooked in the galleries. Bring a sack lunch to enjoy on the grounds or grab a bite from nearby spots like The Luxury or Rosella. (210) 978-81090

Key Party

Thursdays, 8-9 p.m.
Bexar Stage 1203 Camden St., San Antonio Downtown

Buy TicketsFree


Bexar Stage hosts a completely free and improvised BYOB show in which performers choose keys from a bowl and invite audience members on stage to share an honest conversation with a fluid ensemble. Guests can enjoy free beer samples courtesy of Alamo Beer. (312) 971-7252

Show Us Your Pride!

Fri., June 21, 6-10 p.m.
Brick at Blue Star 108 Blue Star, San Antonio Southtown

Buy TicketsFree

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It’s the most colorful time of the year again, so break out your rainbows and celebrate everything Pride with San Antonio’s smorgasbord of events. The 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots makes this year’s Pride particularly important, especially in the face of continuing discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community by the current presidential administration. UNIFY San Antonio and the Kind Clinic will start celebrations off right with Show Us Your PRIDE Friday, June 21, featuring performances by the Rey Lopez Showgirls and DJ Ella Ella, HIV testing by Project: H.O.T., free eats and drinks by Street Treats and more.

Rich the Kid

Fri., June 21, 7 p.m.
Aztec Theatre 104 N St Mary's St, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$25


These days, Soundcloud rap is mainstream rap. And artists like Atlanta’s Rich the Kid, who runs in the same orbit as Migos and Kodak Black, are proof. (210) 812-4355

Nita Strauss, Kore Rozzik, Wulfholt

Fri., June 21, 7 p.m.
The Rock Box 1223 E. Houston St., San Antonio Downtown

Buy from TicketFly$8


Sure, Strauss is easy on the eyes, but it’s her skills on the axe that earned her the gig as Alice Cooper’s guitarist in 2014. She made her calling in all-female Iron Maiden tribute act the Iron Maidens and the modern-day version of ’80s glam band Femme Fatale. Strauss is touring in support of her first solo album, Controlled Chaos, which she self-produced and contributed all the bass and electric guitar work. (210) 677-9453

Eli Young Band

Fri., June 21, 7 p.m.
John T. Floores 14492 Old Bandera, Helotes San Antonio

Buy Tickets Buy Tickets Buy Tickets Buy from TicketFly$20-$400


The Eli Young Band, hailing from Denton, will celebrate its 20th anniversary next year. The beloved roots/Americana act’s most recent record is 2017’s Footprints. (210) 695-8827

Jennifer Lopez

Fri., June 21, 8 p.m.
AT&T Center One AT&T Center, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy from Ticketmaster$49-$559


What else can be said about Jennifer Lopez that we don’t already know? She’s a fierce Latina who played Selena in the Tejano legend’s biopic, and she’s done a stellar job of representing Latin women in pop, R&B and hip-hop across three decades. From starting off as dancer in the ’90s sketch comedy In Living Color, to landing on the billboard charts for her Latin-influenced pop grooves, to starring in numerous films, J.Lo has emerged as a beacon of hope, showing that brown women have as much as a place in the entertainment industry as anyone. (210) 444-5000

Sedated

Fri., June 21, 8 p.m.
Bond's 007 Rock Bar 450 Soledad, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$10


Down to the ripped jeans, leather jackets and black wigs, Ramones tribute band Sedated looks as much like the Ramones as the sound like ’em — which is to say, they nail the pop-punk creations that made the ’70s punks from Queens legendary. (210) 660-3091

Rob Baird, Parker Chapin

Fri., June 21, 8 p.m.
Sam's Burger Joint 330 E. Grayson St., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$10-$45


Memphis-bred singer-songwriter Rob Baird is touring behind an emotionally raw new album recorded straight to tape. Expect to hear plenty about the hard truths that failed relationships bring to the surface. Austin’s Parker Chapin, also no stranger to heartache, opens. (210) 223-2830

Finesse Mitchell

Fri., June 21, 7:30 & 9:45 p.m., Sat., June 22, 7 & 9:30 p.m. and Sun., June 23, 7:30 p.m.
Laugh Out Loud Comedy Club 618 NW Loop 410, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$17-$27


Finesse Mitchell is a hardworking stand-up comedian, actor, podcaster and author who first garnered national attention as a guest on a few late night shows and then as a Saturday Night Live cast member (remember “Starkisha”?) from 2003 to 2006. He has since done tons of stand-up shows, a few movies, television and more, and in 2018, his first hour-long stand-up show, The Spirit Told Me to Tell You, aired on Showtime. With a stand-up game that’s endlessly adaptable and palatable — whether performing for national audiences on Shaq’s All-Star Comedy Jam tour or members of the armed forces with Felipe Esparza or Ron White — Mitchell has a knack for winning crowds with his incisive and clever topical humor, his well-honed bits about relationships and domestic life and his political jokes. San Antonians will have several opportunities to catch Mitchell in action as he stops in town for a three-day stint. (210) 541-8805

Men of Steel, Women of Wonder

Fri., June 21, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 1
San Antonio Museum of Art 200 W. Jones Ave., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$12-$20


Evidenced by the global success of recent films such as Black Panther, Avengers: Endgame and Captain Marvel, among many others, the world is still captivated by the concept of superheroes. While less memorable examples might fall within that formulaic realm the New York Times summed up as “mental popcorn, meant to be rapidly consumed and forgotten,” the box office numbers prove we’re still collectively content to sit and watch statuesque freaks of nature fight off evil forces — even when the takeaway is minimal. Long before the schlock of what’s been dubbed “Hollywood’s Comic Book Age,” Superman and Wonder Woman captured imaginations as defenders of humanity fighting injustices amid the backdrops of the Great Depression and WWII. Introduced in 1938 and 1941, respectively, this iconic, spandex-clad pair inspire myriad incarnations in “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder,” an exhibition organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, and landing at the San Antonio Museum of Art this summer. Although it might conjure visions of comic cons and nerdy fan art, the traveling show digs deep into the cultural significance of both figures — and it isn’t an entirely kid-friendly affair. Curated by Alejo Benedetti, the collection of 70-plus paintings, photographs, videos and installations goes beyond the expected depictions of costumed heroism to explore sexuality, immigration, race, idolatry, desire and the very building blocks that made these characters possible. Spanning from the 1930s to the present day, “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder” builds an interpretive timeline in four thematic sections. Encompassing both the reverent and irreverent, the introductory section The Heroes We Know comprises photographer Siri Kaur’s amusing portraits of celebrity impersonators captured in mundane, contemporary contexts, Peter Saul’s playfully surreal painting Superman Versus the Toilet Duck and a provocative yet nostalgic installation by Jim Shaw, The Issue of My Loins, that showcases — and supersizes — Superman’s crotch. Placing the mythical stars in historical context, Origin Stories is reportedly the germinating seed for the entire exhibition. Here, real-life men of steel and women of wonder are presented in etchings of 1930s-era steel workers building the metropolis, photographs of women welding in the Willow Run bomber plant in the 1940s and Norman Rockwell’s 1943 painting of brawny machinist and feminist icon Rosie the Riveter eating a sandwich as the American flag billows in the background. Contrasting God-like power with traces of vulnerability, Glimpsing Humanity places our heroes in unexpected contexts: an alienated Superman reads the paper amid a barren landscape in Llyn Foulkes’ 1991 painting Where Did I Go Wrong and gets lit in Mike Kelley’s 1999 video Superman Recites Selections from “The Bell Jar” and Other Works by Sylvia Plath. Wonder Woman becomes a religious icon in Valetin Popov’s 2009 painting St. Wonder Woman and gets placed In Exile alongside the Virgin Mary, Aphrodite and others in Mary Beth Edelson’s mixed-media painting from 1989. Timely and provocative, the closing section Defender of the Innocent challenges stereotypes of gender and race while importantly reminding that both beloved characters are immigrants (he’s from Krypton, she’s from Themyscira, aka Paradise Island). Sarah Hill addresses the plight of a trans Wonder Woman in the 2014 video They Wonder; late San Antonio artist Mel Casas calls out the lack of diversity in the superhero realm in his painting Humanscape 70 (Comic Whitewash); Superman locks lips with Batman in Rich Simmons’ 2014 mixed-media work Between the Capes; Dulce Pinzón celebrates Mexican immigrants as working-class superheroes in staged photographs; and an installation attributed to the U.S. Department of Illegal Superheroes (ICE DISH) comes complete with a hotline where concerned citizens can report suspicious activity. As host venue, SAMA rises to the heroic occasion with an abundance of complementary programs, including talks with featured artists, weekly gallery talks, workshops, a Superhero Pajama Party (July 26) and outdoor screenings of Black Panther (June 28), Superman: The Movie (July 12), Nacho Libre (July 19), The Incredibles 2 (August 2), Batman (August 6), Wonder Woman (August 9), Birdman (August 16), Lu Over the Wall (August 23) and Superman II (August 30). (210) 978-8100

Ride: The Musical

Fridays, Saturdays, 8-10 p.m. Continues through June 22
The Gregg Barrios Theater at the Overtime 5409 Bandera Road, Suite 205, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$10-$15


Grab that friend of yours who can do an ear-splitting two-finger whistle and hail a taxi to the Overtime Theater’s latest original production — Ride: The Musical. New York City cab driver Stockton spends his days in traffic, living his life in stop-and-go as he scrambles to pay the bills each paycheck, while his daughter Jess longs for a life beyond what can be afforded on their meager means. When a limo driver drops into their lives, the two are faced with a choice: “Will they continue life as they know it, or will they shift gears and change their lives forever?” Written by Rachel Roth and Dan Timoskevich, the production features Robert Moritz as Stockton and Arnie Rose as Jess. It’s directed by Nicole Erwin. (210) 557-7562

Twenty Øne Piløts

Sat., June 22, 7 p.m.
AT&T Center One AT&T Center, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy from Ticketmaster$39.50-$327


Comprised of lead vocalist Tyler Joseph and drummer Josh Dun, Twenty One Pilots stitches together the seemingly disparate fabrics of alternative hip-hop, electropop, emo, rap, indie rock, psychedelia, reggae and indietronica for a sound that’s reeled in a legion of fans. (210) 444-5000

The Pastie Pops Big Gay Burlesque Show

Sat., June 22, 8 p.m.
Sexology Institute and Boutique 707 S St Mary's, San Antonio Southtown

Buy Tickets$15-$50

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The Pastie Pops are back with a very special edition of their annual Big Gay Burlesque Show. This year, the show is a benefit for their very own Mustang Ryder, with all proceeds going to help Ryder fund his gender-affirming top surgery. The show will be filled with all the high-quality burlesque, boylesque and drag that you’ve come to expect from the Pastie Pops, with performances by Jasper St. James, Elle Du Jour, Vixy Van Hellen, Mary Annette, Aurora Hart, Dandy Velour, SirGio and more. Hosted by Camille Toe, the show is the perfect way to celebrate Pride, as well as make a tangible difference in the life of a core member of the troupe. (210) 487-0371

Gina Chavez

Sat., June 22, 8 p.m.
Sam's Burger Joint 330 E. Grayson St., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$12-$50


Gina Chavez’s well-crafted folk tunes helped her win Austin Musician of the Year back in 2015. Her blend of bilingual folk-pop has also garnered national attention on NPR’s “All Things Considered” and its Tiny Desk concert series. Those accolades and important moments of exposure came because Chavez — a visible member of the LGBTQ community — creates music and lyrics that are heartfelt and personal enough to win over a broad audience, regardless of sexuality identifiers. (210) 223-2830

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