Events starting Mar. 23 in San Antonio

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“America on Stage”

Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through June 30
McNay Art Museum 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


Arguably one of the most overlooked aspects of the McNay is the the museum’s impressive Tobin Collection of Theatre Arts, which boasts more than 12,00o objects spanning from the 1500s to the present day. Built around a sprawling gift from late collector, philanthropist, theater patron and design enthusiast Robert L.B. Tobin and expanded by curators Linda Hardberger and Jody Blake, the collection encompasses rare books, small-scale models, costume illustrations and stage designs created by modern masters such as Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. Organized by Head of Curatorial Affairs René Paul Barilleaux and Curatorial Assistant Timothy Retzloff, the recently opened exhibition “America on Stage” aims to celebrate “the vision of the nation’s 20th- and 21st-century master designers on stages across the U.S. and around the world.” Exploring four key themes — Broadway, Nostalgia, Breaking Tradition, and Social Justice — the show combines maquettes from productions of Cabaret, In the Heights, West Side Story and You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown; a pop-up theater where guests can view scenes from a conceptual revival of Spring Awakening; and interactive areas that invite museum-goers to “take center stage in a recreated stage set — and even tap dance.” (210) 824-5368

"Transcendental Tricentennial: Love Letters to San Anto, the (he)Art of David Zamora Casas"

Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through July 28
Institute of Texan Cultures 801 E César Chávez Blvd, San Antonio San Antonio

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Over the last four decades, self-described “artivist” David Zamora Casas has delighted, shocked and intrigued San Antonio audiences with paintings, installations, altars and performance works that essentially present the artist himself as a canvas. Fusing elements of folk and outsider art with nods to the aesthetics of Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí, the DIY spirit of rasquachismo, religious iconography and Latinx and LGBTQ* activism, Casas has established something many artists strive for fruitlessly: an instantly recognizable aesthetic that’s distinctly their own. Nicknamed Nuclear Meltdown and dubbed a “clown shaman” by esteemed author and MacArthur Genius Sandra Cisneros, Casas often makes cameos in his own paintings, his fire-engine red lips, devilish goatee and Dalí-esque mustache emerging from surreal tableaus populated by skulls, deities, monkeys and mermaids swimming amid swirling patterns, Mesoamerican symbols and hand-painted text reminiscent of retablos. In the words of Chicano art specialist Tomas Ybarra-Frausto, Casas’ canvases “mix word and image to visualize autobiographical and universal stories  of homoerotic love, loss and persistent social concerns including immigration, environmental plunder, gender disparity and the multiple issues facing marginalized individuals and communities.” Billed as an artistic explosion of “folk-baroque manifestations” exploring themes ranging from indigenous history to gender fluidity, Casas’ new solo show “Transcendental Tricentennial” comprises “miles of ribbon, yards of fabric, embellished prints, various on-site assemblages, oil and acrylic paintings on canvas, barbed-wire and bone sculptures, and a Día de los Muertos ofrenda which spills into our collective consciousness.” Made possible by a grant from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), the “mega-installation” also involves creative collaborations with the likes of accordion queen Eva Ybarra and video/film producers Laura Varela and Fadela Gacis Castro. As for its slightly unexpected landing at the Institute of Texan Cultures, Casas reminds that the exhibition evokes the ITC’s mission to be “a lesson in diversity [that] shows the uniqueness and beauty of the many cultures that came to Texas.” (210) 458-2300

Brunch on the Riverwalk

Saturdays, Sundays, 6:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
The Hotel Contessa 306 W. Market, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$12-$20

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Check out how Hotel Contessa does Brunch with their new all-day brunch menu available every Saturday and Sunday on the Riverwalk. Try banana bread french toast, a crab cake benedict, chicken and waffle sliders, and more. Plus, guests can enjoy live entertainment from 11 am- 1 pm. (210) 298-8040

Brunch 101

Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.
Southtown 101 101 Pereida, San Antonio San Antonio

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Get schooled on How-To-Brunch the right way at Southtown 101. This event won't offer foo-foo foods or weird creations, just steak, eggs, bacon, pancakes, and burgers. This brunch will also offer buckets of champagne, mason jar micheladas, sangria, and bloody mary's to cure any hangover.

Downtown Delicacy

Saturdays, Sundays, 1-4 p.m.
Ocho at the Havana Hotel 1015 Navarro Street, San Antonio San Antonio

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Ocho at the Havana Hotel is hosting a downtown delicacy tour for food lovers. Whether it is traditional Tex-Mex or dishes unique to San Antonio, the tour will excite your taste buds and show you a side of The Alamo City never seen before. (210) 951-2416

Renaissance Shopping and Art Fest

Sat., March 24, 11 a.m.-6 p.m.
The Jackson Ranch 8910 Callaghan Road, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy TicketsFree

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The Renaissance Shopping and Art Fest is hosting an two day event full of shopping at artists booths, pop-up shops, live music, and much more. Costume and best booth decoration contest winners daily. Go to the website to see the artists and shops that are participating. (210) 344-8910

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