Events This Weekend in San Antonio

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Parker McCollum

Fri., June 28, 7:30 p.m.
The Backyard Amphitheater 2254 US-87, Fredericksburg Fredericksburg, TX

Buy Tickets$20


This Austin-based country artist is known for turning his relationship frustrations into songs you can not only relate but dance along to. After all, there’s nothing wrong with two-steppin’ while lamenting the crazy ways of your ex.

Appleseed Cast

Fri., June 28, 8 p.m.
Paper Tiger 2410 N. St. Mary's St., San Antonio St. Mary's strip

Buy from TicketFly$13


Although its career tracked that of ’90s emo acts Cap’n Jazz and Joan of Arc, Kansas’ Appleseed Cast didn’t make a huge impact until the 2000s, when its textured guitar work and winsome singing caught fire. While there was an aggressive edge to the band’s music, the atmospheric power behind its sound was more akin to bands like Explosions in the Sky than in-your-face hardcore. (210) 841-3771

Fairwell, Blood Between Us, Circadia, In Balance, Planetary, Above My Enemy

Fri., June 28, 8 p.m.
The Rock Box 1223 E. Houston St., San Antonio Downtown


This bill’s metalcore headliners pride themselves on bringing — and being full of — “Southern California emotion.” That said, they’ll put the latest addition to the Rock Box to the test in the intimate basement area that’s acquired shows originally booked for the recently closed Jack’s Patio Bar. (210) 677-9453

Massive Brain Damage, Executioner, X.I.L, Bad Ideals

Fri., June 28, 8 p.m.
The Guillotine 1816 N Main Ave, San Antonio Central


Massive Brain Damage, a hardcore outfit from LA, top this bill of punk and extreme metal. The band’s bassist, Ruben Alvarez, sports a Maiden T-shirt on in their promo shot — always an asset for a four-stringer. (210) 227-2623

Quaker Folk

Fri., June 28, 9 p.m.
Brick at Blue Star 108 Blue Star, San Antonio Southtown


For a bunch of pacifists, the Society of Friends — otherwise known as Quakers — sure get people riled up, what with their refusal to fight other people’s wars or own other folks as slaves and all. Arizona noiseician and practicing Quaker Stephen A. Cosand stirs up a ruckus of his own via his Quaker Folk project, trading in the righteous riffage of his straight-edge hardcore background for sanctified static. Cosand describes his live shows as opportunities to treat blown-out noise walls as meditative prayer practice, and while there’s no mistaking Quaker Folk’s feedback squalls for meetinghouse silence, there is definitely a peaceful stillness at the center of the storm. Dr. Noize and Shadow People round out the boisterous bill. (210) 262-8653

Pride Bigger Than Texas 2019 Festival and Parade

Sat., June 29, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.
Crockett Park 1300 N. Main Ave, San Antonio San Antonio

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It’s the most colorful time of the year again, so break out your rainbows and celebrate everything Pride with San Antonio’s smorgasbord of events. The 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots makes this year’s Pride particularly important, especially in the face of continuing discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community by the current presidential administration. Things will kick into high gear on June 29 for the annual “Pride Bigger Than Texas” Festival and Parade, hosted by Pride San Antonio. In honor of the Stonewall anniversary, this year’s theme is “Remember. Honor. Educate.” The festivities start in Crockett Park at 11 a.m. with entertainers on deck including Brian Justin Crum, Drowning Mona, Luciana, Sizzy Rocket, Sandra Valls, Patsy Torrres and Bidi Bidi Banda. At 3 p.m., you’ll have to choose between body slams and the pinnacle of romance, because Pride Championship Wrestling has been scheduled at the same time as the “We All Love the Same” mass wedding — so plan accordingly. The festival winds down at 7 p.m., but you can pop over to The Strip on N. Main for the official afterparty, which will run all the way until 3 a.m. (free, 1416-1503 N. Main Ave.) If you want to stick around Crockett Park for the parade, you can also catch the Running of the Queens High Heel Race at 8:45 p.m. right before the action begins at 9. Plus, there’ll be some post-parade fireworks.

Midland, Paul Cauthen, Desure

Sat., June 29, 7 p.m.
Whitewater Amphitheater 11860 FM 306, New Braunfels New Braunfels


When a band hails from Dripping Springs, Texas and got its name from a Dwight Yoakum song, you already know that you’re in store for some serious country goodness. Such is the case with neo-traditionalist country act Midland. The trio dropped a self-titled EP in 2016 and its debut (and, so far, only) album On the Rocks in 2017. Paul Cauthen — a singer-songwriter from Tyler who mixes rock, soul and gospel into his hard Texas country sound — shares the bill. Los Angeles singer-songwriter Josh Desure, who records and performs as Desure, will round things out with his Springsteen-influenced take on Americana. All told, this show presents a fine opportunity for fans of new-school country artists with old-school tendencies to get to know some new talent. These three acts also happen to share the trait of putting on rousing, perhaps even bruising, live shows.

Pride on The Strip

Sat., June 29, 7 p.m.-3 a.m.
The Strip on Main 1416-1503 N. Main Avenue, San Antonio Tobin Hill


It’s the most colorful time of the year again, so break out your rainbows and celebrate everything Pride with San Antonio’s smorgasbord of events. The 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots makes this year’s Pride particularly important, especially in the face of continuing discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community by the current presidential administration. After the Pride Bigger Than Texas Festival winds down at 7 p.m. on Saturday, things will kick into high gear at The Strip on N. Main, so take a quick jaunt over from Crockett Park for the afterparty to end all afterparties.

Skin-Prov: Summer of STRIP

Sat., June 29, 7:30-9 p.m.
Love Shack Boutique 1580 Babcock Rd, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$20

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The summer is about to get much hotter with lots of shimmying and plenty of shaking. San Antonio’s longest-running neo-burlesque troupe, the Stars and Garters, is bringing an interactive improv show with sizzling and sinful eroticism to the MoSA (Museum of Sexy Art) space at the Love Shack Boutique! Not only will the performers striptease with boisterous theatrics but they’ll also offer the audience members a dominating role in the performance. The burlesque performers will submit to the whims of audience members, who will spin the wheel of titillating tunes to determine the song the performers dance to — and there may even be props! The all-star ensemble, voted the Best Burlesque Troupe in the San Antonio Current’s Best of SA poll five times, will feature Suki Jones, Black Orchid, CoCo Simone and Giselle J’Adore, along with guest star Miss Sugar Free and more. Buy your tickets now to ensure you’re close enough to feel the heat. 432.235.0414

Rosie Flores

Sat., June 29, 8 p.m.
The Lonesome Rose Honky Tonk & Backyard 2106 North Saint Mary's Street, San Antonio St. Mary's strip

Buy Tickets$10


Longtime Texas musical treasure Rosie Flores’ approach to musical Americana runs the gamut, working in elements of country, jazz, rockabilly and Mariachi. Even at the age of 68, she still puts on a dynamite show.

Kivi

Sat., June 29, 8 p.m.
Limelight 2718 N St. Mary's, San Antonio Central


Billed as “an evening of house and techno,” this event will include lighting, lasers and visuals to go along with the music. Of course, it will also include a healthy serving of “the untz,” courtesy of your host Kivi. (210) 995-7229; (210) (FAX)

Strangelove

Sat., June 29, 8 p.m.
Aztec Theatre 104 N St Mary's St, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$16


Not only content with sounding exactly like Depeche Mode at their peak, Strangelove’s commitment to accuracy goes down to the smallest detail. For example, the singer rocks a bare torso while fog machines spray full blast and lasers fill the venue with moody splashes of color. You’ll feel like you stepped back into the Reagan era. (210) 812-4355

Seth Shaw Quartet

Sat., June 29, 8 p.m.
Bar 301 23567 W. Interstate 10, San Antonio Far North


If swing and soul are your thing — or soulful swing for that matter — then hanging with the hip cats in the Seth Shaw Quartet may be exactly what the doctor ordered this Saturday night.

Taco City Rockers #2 Release Party with The Hickoids

Sat., June 29, 10 p.m.
The Bang Bang Bar 119 El Mio Drive, San Antonio Central


During the early ’80s, Texas was a hotbed of pissed-off and creative punk acts, ranging from the Austin’s Big Boys and Dicks to Houston’s Really Red and the Mydolls. San Antonio participated in that uprising too, but with fewer commercially released recordings to show for its efforts. Fifteen years ago, a homespun compilation album called Taco City Rockers set out to right that wrong, serving up a sampling of the city’s punk underground going back to the early ’80s. Now, Kaniption Records, the label behind the release, has dropped a second installment — this one tackling the tall order of documenting 40 years of SA punk. The new LP does an admirable job of hitting the high points, from the New York Dolls-influenced Vamps — arguably the city’s first punk outfit — to the recently launched Sissies, whose tsunami of sound does its forbears proud. The Hickoids, whose song “TJ” is featured on Taco City Rockers #2, will play the launch show, along with Texacala Jones Pony Island Express and the Genzales.

Good Poems at the Good Kind

Sun., June 30, 4 p.m.
The Good Kind Southtown 1127 S St Mary's St, San Antonio Central


Trinity University professor and recent San Antonio Poet Laureate Jenny Browne has curated an ongoing series of poetry readings at The Good Kind’s picturesque Southtown location. This month, the series returns with a stacked lineup, featuring none other than Naomi Shihab Nye, San Antonio’s beloved local poet and recently crowned Young People’s Poet Laureate, who will be reading from her latest book, The Tiny Journalist. Joining Nye are San Antonian Evan Beaty and San Marcos’ Vanessa Couto Johnson, who recently released her first full-length collection pungent dins concentric. While the event kicks off at 4 p.m., the readings will not commence until 5 p.m., so it’s safe to arrive fashionably late. (210) 439-0030

Band of Heathens

Sun., June 30, 8-10 p.m.
Charline McCombs Empire Theatre 226 N. St. Mary's, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy from Ticketmaster$29.50


Americana stalwarts The Band of Heathens recently went into their hometown studio in Austin, TX to record their own version of the classic Ray Charles album “A Message from the People.” In a time where the downtrodden need a voice again, the Heathens have delivered the message paying homage to one of the most important voices in American song history. The band will be doing some limited touring to support this release with a two-set show; one set will be the performance of the Ray Charles album and another set will be The Band of Heathen’s own brand of Americana. (210) 226-5700

The Rocketz

Sun., June 30, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m.
The Mix 2423 N St. Mary's, San Antonio Central


The Rocketz return to The Mix with new songs, new sets and the same energy! Come out Sunday June 30 and join in on the debauchery to check out Southern California Power Trio, The Rocketz, a blend of high energy rockabilly and punk rock that has been touring and headlining shows and festivals since 2009. Featuring Gretsch Artist and front man, Tony Red-Horse who will lead you through a rock and roll rollercoaster of songs about life – both good times and bad. (210) 735-1313

Men of Steel, Women of Wonder

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 1
San Antonio Museum of Art 200 W. Jones Ave., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$12-$20


Evidenced by the global success of recent films such as Black Panther, Avengers: Endgame and Captain Marvel, among many others, the world is still captivated by the concept of superheroes. While less memorable examples might fall within that formulaic realm the New York Times summed up as “mental popcorn, meant to be rapidly consumed and forgotten,” the box office numbers prove we’re still collectively content to sit and watch statuesque freaks of nature fight off evil forces — even when the takeaway is minimal. Long before the schlock of what’s been dubbed “Hollywood’s Comic Book Age,” Superman and Wonder Woman captured imaginations as defenders of humanity fighting injustices amid the backdrops of the Great Depression and WWII. Introduced in 1938 and 1941, respectively, this iconic, spandex-clad pair inspire myriad incarnations in “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder,” an exhibition organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, and landing at the San Antonio Museum of Art this summer. Although it might conjure visions of comic cons and nerdy fan art, the traveling show digs deep into the cultural significance of both figures — and it isn’t an entirely kid-friendly affair. Curated by Alejo Benedetti, the collection of 70-plus paintings, photographs, videos and installations goes beyond the expected depictions of costumed heroism to explore sexuality, immigration, race, idolatry, desire and the very building blocks that made these characters possible. Spanning from the 1930s to the present day, “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder” builds an interpretive timeline in four thematic sections. Encompassing both the reverent and irreverent, the introductory section The Heroes We Know comprises photographer Siri Kaur’s amusing portraits of celebrity impersonators captured in mundane, contemporary contexts, Peter Saul’s playfully surreal painting Superman Versus the Toilet Duck and a provocative yet nostalgic installation by Jim Shaw, The Issue of My Loins, that showcases — and supersizes — Superman’s crotch. Placing the mythical stars in historical context, Origin Stories is reportedly the germinating seed for the entire exhibition. Here, real-life men of steel and women of wonder are presented in etchings of 1930s-era steel workers building the metropolis, photographs of women welding in the Willow Run bomber plant in the 1940s and Norman Rockwell’s 1943 painting of brawny machinist and feminist icon Rosie the Riveter eating a sandwich as the American flag billows in the background. Contrasting God-like power with traces of vulnerability, Glimpsing Humanity places our heroes in unexpected contexts: an alienated Superman reads the paper amid a barren landscape in Llyn Foulkes’ 1991 painting Where Did I Go Wrong and gets lit in Mike Kelley’s 1999 video Superman Recites Selections from “The Bell Jar” and Other Works by Sylvia Plath. Wonder Woman becomes a religious icon in Valetin Popov’s 2009 painting St. Wonder Woman and gets placed In Exile alongside the Virgin Mary, Aphrodite and others in Mary Beth Edelson’s mixed-media painting from 1989. Timely and provocative, the closing section Defender of the Innocent challenges stereotypes of gender and race while importantly reminding that both beloved characters are immigrants (he’s from Krypton, she’s from Themyscira, aka Paradise Island). Sarah Hill addresses the plight of a trans Wonder Woman in the 2014 video They Wonder; late San Antonio artist Mel Casas calls out the lack of diversity in the superhero realm in his painting Humanscape 70 (Comic Whitewash); Superman locks lips with Batman in Rich Simmons’ 2014 mixed-media work Between the Capes; Dulce Pinzón celebrates Mexican immigrants as working-class superheroes in staged photographs; and an installation attributed to the U.S. Department of Illegal Superheroes (ICE DISH) comes complete with a hotline where concerned citizens can report suspicious activity. As host venue, SAMA rises to the heroic occasion with an abundance of complementary programs, including talks with featured artists, weekly gallery talks, workshops, a Superhero Pajama Party (July 26) and outdoor screenings of Black Panther (June 28), Superman: The Movie (July 12), Nacho Libre (July 19), The Incredibles 2 (August 2), Batman (August 6), Wonder Woman (August 9), Birdman (August 16), Lu Over the Wall (August 23) and Superman II (August 30). (210) 978-8100

"Transcendental Tricentennial: Love Letters to San Anto, the (he)Art of David Zamora Casas"

Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through July 28
Institute of Texan Cultures 801 E César Chávez Blvd, San Antonio San Antonio

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Over the last four decades, self-described “artivist” David Zamora Casas has delighted, shocked and intrigued San Antonio audiences with paintings, installations, altars and performance works that essentially present the artist himself as a canvas. Fusing elements of folk and outsider art with nods to the aesthetics of Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí, the DIY spirit of rasquachismo, religious iconography and Latinx and LGBTQ* activism, Casas has established something many artists strive for fruitlessly: an instantly recognizable aesthetic that’s distinctly their own. Nicknamed Nuclear Meltdown and dubbed a “clown shaman” by esteemed author and MacArthur Genius Sandra Cisneros, Casas often makes cameos in his own paintings, his fire-engine red lips, devilish goatee and Dalí-esque mustache emerging from surreal tableaus populated by skulls, deities, monkeys and mermaids swimming amid swirling patterns, Mesoamerican symbols and hand-painted text reminiscent of retablos. In the words of Chicano art specialist Tomas Ybarra-Frausto, Casas’ canvases “mix word and image to visualize autobiographical and universal stories  of homoerotic love, loss and persistent social concerns including immigration, environmental plunder, gender disparity and the multiple issues facing marginalized individuals and communities.” Billed as an artistic explosion of “folk-baroque manifestations” exploring themes ranging from indigenous history to gender fluidity, Casas’ new solo show “Transcendental Tricentennial” comprises “miles of ribbon, yards of fabric, embellished prints, various on-site assemblages, oil and acrylic paintings on canvas, barbed-wire and bone sculptures, and a Día de los Muertos ofrenda which spills into our collective consciousness.” Made possible by a grant from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), the “mega-installation” also involves creative collaborations with the likes of accordion queen Eva Ybarra and video/film producers Laura Varela and Fadela Gacis Castro. As for its slightly unexpected landing at the Institute of Texan Cultures, Casas reminds that the exhibition evokes the ITC’s mission to be “a lesson in diversity [that] shows the uniqueness and beauty of the many cultures that came to Texas.” (210) 458-2300

Daniel Rios Rodriguez & Raul Gonzalez

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 18
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


With a powerful trio of exhibitions already on view, Artpace gives us two more reasons to visit this spring with the unveiling of new projects by San Antonio-based artists Daniel Rios Rodriguez and Raul Gonzalez. Although Rodriguez and Gonzalez explore wildly different topics and themes, their bright and bold bodies of work find common ground in playful energy, DIY aesthetics and transformations of commonplace materials. A Houston transplant who earned an MFA from UTSA along with grants from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, the Surdna Foundation and the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), Gonzalez has long been fixated on the concept of work in many forms — construction, manual labor and his dual roles as a “werking artist” and undeniably cool stay-at-home dad. He’s captured the everyday joys of fatherhood in figurative drawings, celebrated his love for Whataburger and the Houston Astros in paintings and installations, enhanced his exhibitions with energetic, movement-based performances and even danced for 4.3 miles — continuously from downtown to the McNay. With a title lifted from a song by bygone Texas hip-hop duo UGK, his “Front and Back, and Side to Side” promises to transform Artpace’s Main Space windows with a “multi-dimensional mural” rendered in cardboard and colored duct tape. (Cue the selfies). A native of Killeen who earned his MFA from Yale and has exhibited in New York, Chicago, Marfa, Ireland and beyond, Rodriguez takes a tactile approach to small-scale “semi-figurative” paintings inspired by personal experiences and the natural world. Frequently using oddly shaped, homemade panels, he paints scenes and patterns in thick, textural layers, adding organic-looking embellishments such as stones, shells and feathers, and finishing the pieces with earthy frames rendered in found bits of wood, rope, wire and hardware accents. Bringing to mind everything from cave drawings and tribal symbology to folk and outsider art, Rodriguez’s work comes to light in “Bruisers,” his first ever solo show in Texas. Nodding to the battle scars we collect while navigating life on Earth, Rodriguez says the exhibition title also speaks to the surfaces of his paintings, many of which “undergo a lot of heavy hitting and burning and throwing across the floor.” During the opening reception, both artists will give short talks about their work and Artpace will also be rolling out a new Third Thursdays series that kicks off with a rooftop screening of shorts curated by the San Antonio Film Festival ($5-$10, 8pm Thu, May 16). (210) 212-4900

Nate Cassie and Constance Lowe: Minding the Gaps

Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through July 13
Ruiz-Healy Art 201-A E. Olmos Dr., San Antonio San Antonio


Although its title might conjure the sights and sounds of crowded London Underground stations, Ruiz-Healy Art’s new exhibition “Minding the Gaps” is not an artistic exploration of railway safety. Rather than addressing the potentially life-threatening distances between subway platforms and train cars, the gaps to be mindful of here are substantially more conceptual in nature. Blurring the boundaries between figuration and abstraction, form and function, the two-person show examines domesticity, permutation and perception while pairing sculptural works by mixed-media artists Nate Cassie and Constance Lowe. A New Jersey native who earned an MFA from UTSA and has exhibited at Artpace, the McNay and Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., Cassie works between drawing, painting, sculpture, video and digital media. While his previous bodies of work have taken shape in abstract woodblock prints named after flowers, architectural birdhouses and etchings of spindly Texas trees, Cassie’s recent output falls within the realm of functional ceramics. While not immediately clear from their earthy finishes and organic imperfections, his almost ancient-looking jugs, cups and bottles reference hard-to-define “spaces in between” and the “gaps that distance surface from volume, skin and structure, formal and intuitive systems.” Missouri-born Lowe earned an MFA from Western Michigan University, has shown at the Southwest School of Art and the Phoenix Art Museum and, like Cassie, is an alum of Artpace’s International Artist-in-Residence program. Although perhaps better known for geometric abstractions that fuse elements of photography and fiber art, Lowe also pushes her work into a sculptural realm with curious objects that suggest interventions on furniture or household decor. Whether combining calfskin, vinyl, felt, wood, mirrors or hardware, her three-dimensional pieces often draw inspiration from her family’s history of Midwestern farming. As for the “gaps” in question, they reveal themselves in the context of Lowe’s interest in “the abstraction of farmland as seen from the air” — and specifically the painterly photographs of the Earth captured by NASA’s Landsat satellite. (210) 804-2219

“America on Stage”

Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through June 30
McNay Art Museum 6000 N. New Braunfels Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


Arguably one of the most overlooked aspects of the McNay is the the museum’s impressive Tobin Collection of Theatre Arts, which boasts more than 12,00o objects spanning from the 1500s to the present day. Built around a sprawling gift from late collector, philanthropist, theater patron and design enthusiast Robert L.B. Tobin and expanded by curators Linda Hardberger and Jody Blake, the collection encompasses rare books, small-scale models, costume illustrations and stage designs created by modern masters such as Pablo Picasso and Henri Matisse. Organized by Head of Curatorial Affairs René Paul Barilleaux and Curatorial Assistant Timothy Retzloff, the recently opened exhibition “America on Stage” aims to celebrate “the vision of the nation’s 20th- and 21st-century master designers on stages across the U.S. and around the world.” Exploring four key themes — Broadway, Nostalgia, Breaking Tradition, and Social Justice — the show combines maquettes from productions of Cabaret, In the Heights, West Side Story and You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown; a pop-up theater where guests can view scenes from a conceptual revival of Spring Awakening; and interactive areas that invite museum-goers to “take center stage in a recreated stage set — and even tap dance.” (210) 824-5368

"Bruce Lee Shoes"

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through July 20
Cinnabar Art Gallery 1420 South Alamo, #147, San Antonio San Antonio


Cinnabar’s latest exhibition showcases the work of Emanuel De Sousa, a Portugese-born, London-based artist who puts a poppy spin on portraiture. In addition to nods to iconic martial artist Bruce Lee and his yellow jumpsuits, De Sousa’s latest series of paintings features porcelain dogs, mylar balloons and other objects plucked from “tiny closed universes where absurd, nonsensical realities make sense.” (210) 557-6073 (FAX); (210)

Looking for Langston

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11

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Although his resume includes writing and directing credits for the award-winning coming-of-age drama Young Soul Rebels (1991) and the blaxploitation documentary BaadAsssss Cinema (2002), British filmmaker and installation artist Isaac Julien is arguably better known for conceptual films presented on multiple screens simultaneously. Seemingly dissected and left for viewers to reassemble with their own eyes, these immersive projects have involved journeys to remote ice caves in Iceland, juxtapositions of Arctic and African landscapes, travels through China and curious collaborations with the likes of Tilda Swinton and James Franco. A co-founder of the Sankofa Film and Video Collective (an organization “dedicated to developing an independent black film culture in the areas of production, exhibition and audience”), Julien made one of his earliest waves with Looking for Langston — a 1989 film billed as “a lyrical exploration — and recreation — of the private world of poet, social activist, novelist, playwright and columnist Langston Hughes (1902-1967) and his fellow black artists and writers who formed the Harlem Renaissance during the 1920s.” In essence a non-linear homage that presents Hughes as a metaphor for the black gay experience, the film has earned cult status and is taught extensively in universities as part of African-American and queer studies programs. Appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2017, Julien was a favorite of late local artist and philanthropist Linda Pace, who acquired more than 50 of his works during her lifetime. In celebration of Looking for Langston’s 30th anniversary, the Linda Pace Foundation’s gallery Studio at Ruby City showcases the 45-minute film as the anchor of a new exhibition of two recently acquired photographs Julien shot during production — Film-Noir Angels and Masquerade No. 3.

Sink, Florida, Sink

Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through June 30
The Public Theater of San Antonio 800 W. Ashby Pl., San Antonio Central

Buy Tickets$10-$35


A new play has risen from the depths and washed ashore at The Public Theater. As part of The Public’s Fresh Ink program, Shannon Jarrell-Ivey directs the world premiere of David Kimple’s near-future, semi-apocalyptic drama Sink, Florida, Sink. In the face of a 12th successive hurricane (climate change much?), Violet (Alyx Irene Gonzales), Sebastian (Ivan A. Ortega) and the other remaining residents of coastal hamlet Cocoa Beach must fight to keep their heads above water in more ways than one. While doing everything they can to keep their home afloat, Violet and Sebastian must confront a whole other storm when a mysterious stranger from their past reappears in town. Truly, in Cocoa Beach, it’s not just the hurricane-force winds you have to weather. (210) 733-7258

Jaston Williams in Don’t Blame the Car

June 27-29, 8 p.m., June 29-30, 2 p.m. and Sun., June 30, 7 p.m.
Classic Theatre of San Antonio 1924 Fredericksburg Rd., San Antonio Balcones Heights

Buy Tickets$25


Jaston Williams is making his annual pilgrimage to The Classic Theatre with his latest one-man show: Don’t Blame the Car. Known for the slew of southern characters he’s portrayed in Greater Tuna (with partner Joe Sears) and other one-man shows like A Wolverine Walks Into a Bar…Conversations Over Ice and Clear to Partly Crazy, Williams has parlayed his wildcard humor and cheeky costumes (notably including the chicken getup he donned for I’m Not Lying) into a long-running career as an actor, comedian and writer. For Don’t Blame the Car, Williams delves into the follies of his teenage years, centered on his parents’ attempts to teach him to drive despite the fact that at 4’11” he could barely see over the steering wheel. Come for the vehicular humor, and stay to finally learn why Williams carries a “lifelong grudge against potatoes,” plus much more. (210) 589-8450

THE 2ND ANNUAL SAN ANTONIO PRE-PRIDE KICKOFF PARTY

Fri., June 28, 5 p.m.-2 a.m.
Smoke Downtown 1170 E. Commerce St, San Antonio Downtown

Buy Tickets$5-$10


Kickoff Pride with Smoke Downtown at The 2nd Annual San Antonio Pre-Pride Kickoff Party. There will be Live Music, Drag Show, and Vendors. The ticket prices are $5.00 presale and until 8pm the day of event and $10.00 after 8pm. Tickets for kids 12 and under are free. (210) 454-2635

EL Reventon Seniors Dance

Fri., June 28, 5:30-11:30 p.m.

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@ URAN EVENT CENTER, 4907 Callaghan Road,
Seniors Dance 'Put On Your Dancing Shoes" an dance and meet old and new friends at the newly opened Urban Event Center. DJ music of the 50's,60's, and 70's and be lucky to win special gifts and prices. Tidbit Foods and beverages available to enjoy throughout the evening. Special reservations for party of 10 includes chairs and tale. info contact Monica @ (210) 863-4878 (210) 315-3937

Summer Exhibition: Works by Rodolfo Choperena, Amada Miller and Jorge Villareal

Fri., June 28, 6-9 p.m.
The Gallery at MBS 1115 S. Alamo St., San Antonio San Antonio


The Gallery at MBS Yoga hosts the opening of its Summer Exhibit on Friday, June 28th. New arrivals by internationally renowned photographer Rodolfo Choperena will be featured in the yoga gallery, alongside MBS' favorite remnants from this year's C.A.M. show, created by the indubitably prolific Amada Miller. The Summer Exhibit will take on a bit of a party atmosphere since it coincides with a going away celebration for friend of MBS, co-gallerist and tremendous artist Jorge Villarreal, who was picked for the Blue Star Contemporary Berlin Residency. Limited Edition prints will be available to help raise funds for Jorge’s three-month stay in Berlin. (210) 378-0379

Canciones Sonidos De San Antonio

Fri., June 28, 6:30-9 p.m.
Pearl Park 303 Pearl Pkwy, San Antonio Downtown

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Canciones, the free concert series celebrating the sounds of South Texas, returns to Pearl Park this summer. Food and drink will be available for purchase at the Bottling Department and Southerleigh’s oyster bar. Sonidos de San Antonio: Will feature Eddie and the Valiants and Mitch Webb and the Swindles, two seminal bands that have been part of the city’s music scene for decades and can aptly play the iconic sounds of San Antonio. 210.212.7260

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