Events This Weekend in San Antonio

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Selena

Fri., Sept. 20, 8 p.m.
Mission Marquee Plaza 3100 Roosevelt, San Antonio San Antonio


Actress Constance Marie might have shown little Selena how to do the washing machine in the 1997 biopic Selena, but local fitness company Mix Fit SA has a few more advanced dance moves for those interested in working out before the free screening of the beloved film on the life and career of late Queen of Tejano Selena Quintanilla-Pérez. At 6:30 p.m., Mix Fit SA trainers will be out at the Mission Marquee Plaza to tone up moviegoers with a free “Como la Flor” Zumba class. Break a little sweat before the movie and feel guilt-free later when you decide to eat from one of the food trucks parked at the event. Maybe there will even a pizza truck, so you can chow down with J-Lo during her pizza-eating scene. “I eat medium pizzas all by myself with lots of pepperoni,” she memorably tells actor Jon Seda. “And I drink Cokes and scarf Doritos and never exercise.” We’re not sure if Mix Fit SA would promote that diet, but maybe a few extra cumbia steps will burn the extra calories. (210) 554-1000

Brothertiger

Fri., Sept. 20, 8 p.m.
Paper Tiger 2410 N. St. Mary's St., San Antonio St. Mary's strip

Buy Tickets$10


Brothertiger sounds like the soundtrack to a cruise along the coast in a neon-drenched simulated version of what the 1980s drawn from a dream. The music perfectly captures the breezy synths of that era of excess but filters them through the chilled-out consciousness of a modern indie musician.

The Queer Queens of Qomedy

Fri., Sept. 20, 8-10 p.m.
Beethoven Hall 420 S. Alamo St., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$30-$45


Lords and ladies, bow down to the Queer Queens of Qomedy as they make their fourth return to San Antonio, bringing a fresh round of laughs. Pillaging Texas on a six-day tour, this year’s trio consists of comedy royalty Poppy Champlin, Sandra Valls and Vickie Shaw. Once crowned as America’s Funniest Real Woman on The Joan Rivers Show, Champlin has also graced LOGO, Comedy Central and the Oprah Winfrey Network with her comedic prowess. Hailing from Laredo, Sandra Valls has appeared on BET’s Comic View and co-wrote and co-stars in The Latina Christmas Special. Vickie Shaw — seen on Comedy Central’s Premium Blend or her special You Can Take The Girl Out of Texas! — rounds out the royal court with relatable Southern humor. The Queer Queens clearly aren’t afraid to use comedy to conquer the politically charged Lone Star State. (210) 227-2751

Hail the Sun

Sat., Sept. 21, 6:30 p.m.
Paper Tiger 2410 N. St. Mary's St., San Antonio St. Mary's strip

Buy Tickets$17-$20


This California outfit that walks the line between emo and prog is heading into town after dropping a blistering new single at the start of the month.

Jinjer, The Browning, Sumo Cyco

Sat., Sept. 21, 7 p.m.
The Rock Box 1223 E. Houston St., San Antonio Downtown

Buy from TicketFly$17.50


Ukrainian metal outfit Jinjer was one of the acts booked into this year’s canceled River City Rockfest — and it appears the band simply swapped out that date for a more intimate stop at the Rock Box. It shouldn’t be surprising Jinjer was originally tapped for the RCRF, even though the fest’s lineup tends to skew more toward older, tried-and-true hard rock stalwarts. Despite its relatively short life, the band has won raves in the U.S. and Europe for breathing life into the tired sub-subgenres of groove metal and metalcore by infusing them with soul and R&B touches. What really closes the deal, though, is the delivery of frontwoman Tatiana Shmailyuk, who bobs between a soulful clean vocals and terrifying death growls with an impressive dexterity. (210) 677-9453

Joe Ely

Sat., Sept. 21, 8 p.m.
Gruene Hall 1281 Gruene, New Braunfels San Antonio

Buy Tickets$25-$100


Since 1977, singer-songwriter Joe Ely has been delivering rhythmic roots numbers that you can’t help but shake your hips to. The Texas legend is gracing Gruene Hall with his presence just in time for audience members to dance away the sadness of summer’s departure. (830) 606-1281

Gutter Demons, Sick City Daggers, Grim Folks

Sun., Sept. 22, 8 p.m.
Paper Tiger 2410 N. St. Mary's St., San Antonio St. Mary's strip

Buy Tickets$10-$15


Another perfectly good Sunday in San Anto — another stacked psychobilly lineup to help you hell-stomp and piss it all away.

Gardens & Yoga

Third Saturday of every month, 10-11 a.m.
San Antonio Botanical Garden 555 Funston, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$15


AC Power Yoga pops up at the Botanical Garden for an outdoor class suitable for all ages and skill levels. Attendees are asked to bring a durable yoga mat, sunscreen, water, bug spray and an open mind. (210) 536-1400

San Antonio Nerd Night

Fourth Sunday of every month, 2-10 p.m.
Knight Watch Games 16350 Blanco Road, San Antonio North Central


Gamers converge the fourth Sunday of every month for a meetup benefiting area nonprofits. (214) 641-9352

‘Huddled Masses: Who We Are’

Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 30
Institute of Texan Cultures 801 E César Chávez Blvd, San Antonio San Antonio


While it’s nothing new within the photographic realm, the use of handwritten signage as a conceptual prop has loaned itself to diverse projects that function as distinct signs of their own times. Shot in a London alleyway as an introduction to filmmaker D. A. Pennebaker’s 1967 Bob Dylan documentary Don’t Look Back, the pioneering music video “Subterranean Homesick Blues” shows the iconic singer slinging cue cards that mirror the song’s lyrics — until they fall slightly off-beat, complete with misspelled words such as “pawking metaws” and “sucksess.” The gimmick was later appropriated in videos for Belle and Sebastian, INXS, Steve Earle and “Weird Al” Yankovic, among others. Also created in London, Turner Prize-winning British artist Gillian Wearing’s oft-referenced series “Signs That Say What You Want Them To Say and Not Signs That Say What Someone Else Wants You To Say” entailed her photographing and interviewing more than 500 strangers she encountered on the street. As its title may suggest, her “Signs” project invited participants to be captured holding signs emblazoned with personal sentiments — which run the gamut from defiantly proud (“Queer + Happy”) to sobering (“I Have Been Certified as Mildly Insane!”) to dire (“I Hate This World!”). Other notable endeavors have paralleled Wearing’s format. The Portraits from Occupy Wall Street series Martin Schoeller shot for The New Yorker in 2011, for example, featured a young female protestor’s sign declaring, “Prostitution: the Only Viable Option Available After Graduation to Afford My Student Loan Debt.” Audra Miller’s touching portraits of formerly homeless individuals for the Bay Area exhibition “Everyone Deserves a Home” showed a one subject with a sign reading, “Home Is a Haven From the Insanity of the Rest of This Incomprehensible World.” Local photographer Sarah Brooke Lyons’ well-received series “1005 Faces” even utilized such recognizable personalities as Tim Duncan (“Good, Better, Best, Never Let It Rest Until Your Good Is Better And Your Better Is Your Best!”). Begun in 2016 and completed in late 2018, San Antonio photographer Ramin Samandari’s timely body of work “Huddled Masses: Who We Are” fits in this same vein but with a specific focus on ancestry and immigration. Born in Tehran, Iran, Samandari relocated to Texas at age 17 during the Iranian Revolution, settled in the Alamo City in 1988 and became a U.S. citizen in 1990. Hearkening to his complementary portrait projects “San Antonio Faces of Art” and “Faces of Artpace,” Samandari’s latest body of work took shape through open calls and First Friday photo sessions at his Magic Realism Studio in the Blue Star Arts Complex. While all 320 individuals Samandari photographed for the series were prompted to write a brief statement about their ancestry, some participants focused on broad, universal terms like “neighbor,” “human” and “earth walker.” “This project is about the very idea of America ... a nation made up of people from everywhere, coming to her shores, some escaping famine, war, oppression and some simply looking for better opportunities,” Samandari explained in his artist’s statement. Now part of the permanent collection of the Institute of Texan Cultures, “Huddled Masses: Who We Are” comes to light at a free public reception in conjunction with the monthlong celebration of Fotoseptiembre. (210) 458-2300

Alex de Leon and Elizabeth McGrath

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Dec. 29
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


As it prepares for what promises to be a memorable 25th anniversary in 2020, Artpace is thoughtfully looking back at its infancy — a period guided by its founder, the late artist, collector and philanthropist Linda Pace. Following in the same reflective vein as the 2018 group show “Then and Now,” which brought together works by local Artpace residency alumni Ken Little, Kathy Vargas, Constance Lowe and Ángel Rodríguez Díaz, the influential institution’s latest offerings turn back the clock to celebrate the work of two somewhat unsung artists whose connections to the organization extend back to the start of its residency program. Installed in the street-level Main Space in an arrangement that’s sure to spark the curiosity of passersby, a capsule collection of pieces created by former San Antonio resident Elizabeth McGrath is anchored by Broken, a conceptual sculpture she created during her 1996 Artpace residency. Comprised of a weathered wooden chair enveloped in crocheted silk that stretches to the ceiling like a spider’s web, it’s flanked by unrelated but equally curious sculptures — an organic-looking object pieced together from found wood and Bondo putty, and a snakelike coil fashioned from what appears to be a stuffed floral bedsheet. Behaving almost as conversation prompts for anyone who happens upon them in Artpace’s Main Avenue windows, these odd experiments with materials hard and soft may suggest alternate streams of discourse when viewers learn that McGrath long ago shifted her professional focus from art to psychotherapy. Delivering a poppier, punchier counterpoint to this blast from the past, the work of late Alamo City legend Alex de León lines walls and cases upstairs in Artpace’s Hudson Showroom. Like McGrath, de León represented San Antonio as an International Artist-in-Residence in 1996 and both participated in Artpace’s London Studio Program in 1995, but the similarities seem to end there — and this pairing of exhibitions makes no pretense of connection outside of space and time. An Edinburg native who studied printmaking at Kansas City Art Institute, de León left bold marks on San Antonio from the 1980s until his passing in 2012. Although ceramics emerged as his strong suit and his signature style got pegged as folk art, he didn’t consider himself a ceramicist or a folk artist. In true pop fashion, his work often relied on the repetition of popular imagery and landed on local T-shirts and Hollywood film sets alike. Assembled from a number of local collections, his new self-titled exhibition looks and feels like a tight retrospective for a pioneer of the San Antonio aesthetic. Beyond a playful, even cheery color palette that adorns everything from expertly rendered enamel paintings on steel to functional clay vessels and covetable shot glasses, de León’s pieces are tied together with a visual vocabulary punctuated by police cars, hearses, skulls, beer cans, cigarette packs and steaks on the grill. Although the subject matter is often immediately funny, the pieces’ titles paint a clearer picture of his sharp sense of humor: the 1995 painting Surprized Anything Gets Done As Much As He Drinks depicts a mess of tools, car parts and empty beer bottles scattered around a garage; and a classic pink convertible is parked amid a storm of cigarette butts, booze bottles, martini glasses and musical instruments in the 1997 ceramic bowl She Shoulda Tooka Cab. While it may look like the odd man out, a small cardboard house perched in a corner is taken from the body of work that inspired Artpace Executive Director Riley Robinson to revisit de León’s work in a contemporary context. Taken from his 2004-era “Welcome Home Series,” the ramshackle sculpture was built from materials de León purchased from down-and-out individuals: signs emblazoned with pleas such as “Homeless and Hungry. Please Help If You Can,” “Mother of Three Struggling From Earlier Layoff. Need Help Please” and “Homeless Vet. Please Help. God Bless You. (210) 212-4900

Organic Transformations

Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Fridays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 30
Moody Learning Center 1819 N. Main Ave., San Antonio Downtown


From chipping paint on an old door to the moldering remains of the Titanic on the floor of the Atlantic Ocean, the planet consistently reminds us that our attempts to delineate humanity from the natural world are naïve at best. For Fotoseptiembre, San Antonio College faculty members are presenting a body of work themed on the mutability of the natural world — an examination of the way everything from tree bark to abandoned buildings morph over time via “Organic Transformations.” The exhibition features photos by Tricia Buchhorn, Rebecca Dietz, Joan Fabian, Russell Guerrero, Jo Hilton, Edmund Lo and Mark Magavern, collecting the artists’ varying perspectives on “evidence of the transformations found in nature, the human footprint and the striving of living organisms to co-exist on earth.” (210) 486-1346

‘What My Mother Told Me, What My Grandmother Refused to Say’

Through Sept. 27, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Semmes Gallery University of the Incarnate Word, 4301 Broadway, San Antonio San Antonio


In “What My Mother Told Me, What My Grandmother Refused to Say,” University of the Incarnate Word alumna Theresa Newsome returns to her alma mater to present an “intimate, parallel conversation regarding the conception of tradition, family history and the methodical analysis of one’s genealogical identity.” The photo series includes intimate portraits, outdoor vistas, vignettes of lived-in interior spaces and old family photographs, both posed and candid. Newsome serves as “kinkeeper” for her family, both as the self-appointed family historian — “documenting oral narratives, partaking in biological research” — and as an individual seeking to attune her personal identity with the narrative of her lineage. By juxtaposing the physical archive of antiques and other objects collected over time with portraiture, she seeks to “define the complications, inconsistencies, confusion and truth regarding heritage and personal identity.” (210) 829-6000

Les Miserables

Tuesdays-Thursdays, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Sept. 20, 8 p.m., Sat., Sept. 21, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 22, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sept. 22
The Majestic Theatre 224 E Houston, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy from Ticketmaster$49.50-$160


Published in 1862, Victor Hugo’s magnum opus Les Misérables is considered one of the greatest French novels of the 19th century. Adapted into a musical in 1980, Les Misérables has graced stages globally for almost 40 years. Set in France during a period of revolutionary upheaval, the story follows former prisoner Jean Valjean as he redeems himself in a world full of love, loss, politics — and a lot of singing. The latest touring production features new staging, including reimagined scenery based on the original paintings of Hugo himself. Classic songs “I Dreamed a Dream,” “On My Own” and “Bring Him Home” may end up stuck in your head for weeks to come. (210) 226-3333

Ethel Shipton: Listening to Berlin

Wed., Sept. 18, 6-8 p.m. and Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through Oct. 26
Ruiz-Healy Art 201-A E. Olmos Dr., San Antonio San Antonio


“Listening to Berlin,” Ethel Shipton’s latest show at Ruiz-Healy Art, captures the sights and sounds of Germany’s capital city. Shipton, who was selected for Blue Star Contemporary’s three month residency at Berlin’s Künstlerhaus Bethanien in 2018, draws from her trip in a series of prints, mixed-media works and interactive sculpture. A city rich in history and culture, Berlin has much to offer the traveling artist. While there, Shipton took interest in the vast graffiti culture and street art Berlin has become known for. “I started taking pictures of the graffiti, and the graffiti took me to look at other parts of the city that were interesting to me,” Shipton said in a statement. Among the highlights in this show is a sculptural piece where gallery visitors can sit and listen to the sounds of the city. Like much of Shipton’s work, “Listening to Berlin” focuses on bringing passing, everyday objects into sharp focus during moments of contemplation. In an era filled with constant distractions, Shipton’s work gives viewers permission to truly engage their surroundings. (210) 804-2219

Romeo and Juliet

Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 3 p.m. Continues through Sept. 29
Classic Theatre of San Antonio 1924 Fredericksburg Rd., San Antonio Balcones Heights

Buy Tickets$19-$34


Fall is in the air, and you know what that means: feuding families, dangerous duels and secret weddings, of course. What, did you think we were going to say “pumpkin spice lattes”? The trials and tribulations of teenage love are set to be staged a la Shakespeare at The Classic Theatre this month under the direction of Joe Goscinski, who helmed last year’s production of A Midsummer’s Night Dream. A quotable classic for even the least erudite among us, scenes from Romeo and Juliet populated many of our childhood fantasies of true love. Maybe you never dreamed of faking your own death and in the process causing your lover’s untimely demise, but who hasn’t wanted someone to visit them beneath their balcony in the orchard, lit only by the light of the moon, to promise their hand in marriage? (210) 589-8450

And Then There Were Some

Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m., Sun., Sept. 22, 3 p.m. and Sun., Sept. 29, 7 p.m. Continues through Oct. 5
The Gregg Barrios Theater at the Overtime 5409 Bandera Road, Suite 205, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$10-$15


Whodunnits are having a bit of a comeback lately, with Netflix releasing Murder Mystery starring Jennifer Aniston and Adam Sandler this summer and the star-studded film Knives Out hitting theaters later this fall. San Antonio’s Overtime Theater is getting in on the fun with an interactive murder mystery play. Set in a dilapidated theater, Overtime’s version of the Agatha Christie novel And Then There Were None pits a witch, a local fixer and private detectives against a seemingly uncatchable killer. Along the way, the audience gets to vote twice to determine who makes it out alive — so choose wisely. (210) 557-7562

Oom-Pa-Pa September Gartenfest

Fri., Sept. 20, 5-11:45 p.m.
Beethoven Halle und Garten 422 Pereida, San Antonio Southtown


"Die Original Bayerische Blaskapelle," a 25-piece brass band from Germany, will perform at the Beethoven Männerchor under the baton of conductor Sepp Felix. A $20 wristband covers your $5 admission to the Biergarten plus four full pours from an exclusive lineup of Oktoberfest brews. Free admission for Beethoven members. Traditional German bratwurst, leberkase, potato salad and more available along with our full limeup of German beers on tap. (210) 325-5985

36th Annual Jazz’SAlive

Fri., Sept. 20, 5-11 p.m. and Sat., Sept. 21, 10 a.m.-11 p.m.
Travis Park 301 E. Travis St., San Antonio San Antonio

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This 36th annual, free, outdoor, music, arts, culture and heritage festival Jazz’SAlive returns with two days of jazz music that showcases stellar headliners including five-time Grammy winner Dianne Reeves. Jazz'SAlive is a free community event produced by The San Antonio Parks Foundation on behalf of The City of San Antonio. Everyone is invited to enjoy Travis Park with great music, food and festivities for all ages. (210) 207-3677

74 Dias De Otoño

Fri., Sept. 20, 7-9 p.m.
UNAM-USA San Antonio 600 Hemisfair Park, San Antonio San Antonio


Casa Argentina de San Antonio & Trinity University presents Theater in Spanish on tour from Buenos Aires, Argentina. Playwright Laura Garaglia and actress Anahi Martella are bringing this solo show to the stage in San Antonio. The play is a humanitarian retelling of the conflict between England and Argentina over the Falkland Islands. Trinity University's MAS program will hold a workshop with the audience as part of the Latinx Heritage month celebration on September 19th at the Trinity University campus's Cafe Theater, located inside the Stieren Theater Building from 6:00-8:00pm with a reception at 5:30. CASA and UNAM will host a second performance of the show on the 20th at 7PM, followed by a cake and drink. (830)613-6622

Drag Bingo with Kristi Waters

Fri., Sept. 20, 8-10 p.m.
Sexology Institute and Boutique 707 S St Mary's, San Antonio Southtown

Buy Tickets$10

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Ditch the drab bingo hall for Drag Bingo at the Sexology Institute and Boutique. Hosted by Kristi Waters, join them for a night of drag, surprises and a variety of sexy prizes. Seating is first come, first serve. You can receive $5 in Kinky Cash and automatically be entered into a drawing for your chance to win a special prize just for signing up. The event is also BYOB. (210) 487-0371

POLO G with LUH KEL

Fri., Sept. 20, 8 p.m.-12 a.m.
The Rock Box 1223 E. Houston St., San Antonio Downtown

Buy Tickets$25-$85

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THAT'S LIVE ENT presents POLO G with LUH KEL! Doors open at 8:00 pm. Tickets will also be available at the door day of event. This is an ALL AGES EVENT, but all individuals under 18 must be accompanied by adult. No backbacks, no drawstring bags, no large purses, no vapes and no ins and outs will be permitted. (210) 677-9453

Sacred Star - A Tribute to Dio & Yngwie Malmsteen

Fri., Sept. 20, 9 p.m.-12 a.m.
The Aquaduck Beer Garden 9214 Espada Road, San Antonio South Side

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Primo Promos and The Aquaduck Beer Garden welcome Sacred Star with special guests, Muse Relapse, to their stage! (210) 600-3280

Two Tons of Steel

Fri., Sept. 20, 9:30 p.m.
High Horse Lounge 415 Milam, San Antonio San Antonio


Call it Americana, call it Texas Country, or call it whatever you want, but Two Tons of Steel means serious business when the amps kick on. Check out San Antonio's and South Texas' favorite sons at this new live music venue. (210) 600-4440

2019 San Antonio Congenital Heart Walk

Sat., Sept. 21, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m.
San Antonio Zoo 3903 N. St. Mary's St., San Antonio San Antonio

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The 2019 San Antonio Heart Walk is a fundraiser benefiting The Children’s Heart Foundation and includes a family-friendly walk, music, activities, games, food, special guests, researcher remarks, entertainment and community. The event is open to the public. Event activities end at 11am. Guests may enjoy the zoo until 5pm as a part of the $15 minimum fundraising/donation requirement. (847) 634-6474

Battle of Cibolo Creek 5K / 5 & 10 Mile Race

Sat., Sept. 21, 7:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Buy Tickets$40-$60

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The goal of the Alamo Beer Marathon Challenge is to get you to the finish line of the San Antonio Rock and Roll Marathon or the BCS Marathon. There will be food and beer at each race, and beginning runners will get introduced to some of the great places in San Antonio to get a locally brewed beer and some new places to run. After the run, you will not only enjoy knowing that you are getting closer to your goal of a great half or full marathon, but also have a fun time with friends and family. (210) 849-8275

Broadway Vocal Technique Master Class at The Public Theater

Sat., Sept. 21, 9-11 a.m.
The Public Theater of San Antonio 800 W. Ashby Pl., San Antonio Central

Buy Tickets$25


The Public Theater, in association with The Las Casas Foundation, invite you to join them for a Broadway Connection Master Class: Vocal Technique in the style of Les Miserables. This class will be led by a Broadway Connection teacher and cast member of Les Miserables! Reserve your spot today. Open to ages 12 to 18. Student pricing is $25. Scholarship opportunities available for students of Title 1 and/or unincorporated schools. (210) 733-7258

Senior Health Screening

Sat., Sept. 21, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Continental Cafe 6390 Fairdale Drive, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$70-$149


Continental Café Event Center is hosting Life Line Screening - the nation’s leading provider of preventive health screenings. The screenings offer a five test package to thoroughly check you for risk of stroke, cardiovascular disease and other chronic conditions. The combination of these tests help detect problems before you have symptoms and while your doctor can still take action, so you can keep doing the things you love. (800) 679-5192

“Walking in the Shoes of a Child with Learning Disabilities” Workshop

Sat., Sept. 21, 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
The Winston School San Antonio 8565 Ewing Halsell, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy TicketsFree


This intense, interactive workshop gives attendees a first-hand understanding of the difficulties students with reading and language disabilities encounter. Presented in conjunction with Trinity University. (210) 615-7485

Children's Ministry Training

Sat., Sept. 21, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Buy Tickets$30-$50


@ Living Faith Community Church, 1715 Grandstand Drive, San Antonio, TX 78238
Join the Living Faith Community Church for a half-day training event packed with practical, hands-on takeaways that’ll equip and inspire your whole children’s ministry team. Sometimes the desire for “bigger and better” can make someone lose sight of the most important ingredients in children’s ministry. At this local training event, you’ll discover a surprisingly simple recipe for producing irresistible friendships with Jesus that’ll last a lifetime! They'll zero in on how to build a ministry focused on what Jesus says matters most and explore how to help a new generation love God with all their hearts, souls and minds. (866) 894-9810

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