Events Tomorrow in San Antonio

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PokéFest SA

Sat., July 20, 11 a.m.-7 p.m.
Norris Conference Center 618 NW Loop 410, San Antonio Central

Buy Tickets$15-$47


Once again, it’s time to grab your ‘mons and get your poké on for San Antonio’s homegrown event celebrating one of the most beloved game series and anime this side of Japan. PokéFest SA returns this year with special guest Tara Sands, who voiced Bulbasaur, Phanpy, Oddish and more in almost 200 episodes of the English version of the Pokémon anime. In addition to both Pokémon and Magic: The Gathering card game tournaments, the con includes a pop-up PokéCafé run by the Sweetness Maid Café, in which maids and butlers will serve up sweet treats while you enjoy Pokémon-themed games and a photobooth. If the idea of an American version of the infamous Japanese maid cafés makes you a bit uncomfortable, though, there are plenty of vendors, cosplay and more for you to check out at the day-long event.

Cactus Pear Music Festival: French Roast

Sat., July 20, 3-4 p.m.
Summer Moon Coffee Bar 3233 N St Mary's St #102, San Antonio Northeast

Buy TicketsFree


This year, several changes are in store for Cactus Pear Music Festival. As part of its search for a new Artistic Director to replace Stephanie Sant’Ambrogio, whose last season with Cactus Pear will be in 2021, the two finalists — both former winners of the San Antonio International Piano Competition (now the Gurwitz Piano Competition) — will each serve as a guest festival artist as well as guest artistic director for week two of the festival in this and next year. This summer, 2016 SAIPC Gold Medalist Scott Cuellar takes the helm, and will perform for all four main festival concerts: “Into the Twilight” (July 12), “Baying at the Moon” (July 13), “Goethe Have Music” (July 19) and “Romancing the Notes” (July 20). Cactus Pear is also introducing two free Casual Classix concerts, opening the festival with “Bulgarian Bad Boyz, Brahms and Beer” (6 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, Bar 414, 205 E. Houston) and a caffeinated matinee before the final festival concert that they’re calling “French Roast: Debussy, Ravel and Duparc” (3 p.m. Saturday, July 20, Summer Moon Coffee Bar, 3233 N. St. Mary’s St.). In addition to Cuellar and current director Sant’Ambrogio, artists on deck include members of the San Antonio Symphony such as Jeff Garza, French horn, and Ilya Shterenberg, clarinet, as well as visiting artists Carol Cook, viola; Lachezar Kostov, cello; Viktor Valkov, piano; Timothy Jones, baritone; Ellen DePasquale, violin; and more.

Picturesque

Sat., July 20, 6 p.m.
Vibes Event Center 1211 E. Houston Steet, San Antonio Downtown

Buy Tickets$15-$17


Vibes Underground hosts Picturesque, who released their debut LP on Equal Vision in 2017. The band voices a commitment to total honesty in their music, which they describe as mixing “rock, post-hardcore and pop.”

Built to Spill

Sat., July 20, 7 p.m.
Paper Tiger 2410 N. St. Mary's St., San Antonio St. Mary's strip

Buy from TicketFly$25-$28


Even though Built to Spill was in the 2-1-0 just last year, the Boise, Idaho natives’ contribution to modern indie rock may be worth checking out twice in such a short period. This time, the band’s touring to celebrate the 20th anniversary of definitive album Keep it Like a Secret, the more-cohesive and mature followup to its major label debut Perfect from Now On. More psychedelic and musically sweeping than many of its ’90s alt-rock counterparts, Built to Spill has deservedly emerged an icon of that musical era.

Koe Wetzl, Cody Canada & The Departed, Kody West

Sat., July 20, 7:30 p.m.
Whitewater Amphitheater 11860 FM 306, New Braunfels New Braunfels

Buy Tickets Buy Tickets Buy Tickets Buy from TicketFly$23.10-$881.29


Wetzel’s high-energy show in support of his album Harold Saul High will infuse the energy of rock with the good-ol’ feel of country and give fans “Something to Talk About” on the banks of Canyon Lake. This trifecta of twang sounds like a good excuse to go tubing by day and two-stepping at night — though it’s a toss-up as to which will be hotter.

Lightning and Lasers Live: An electrifying musical experience with ArcAttack and Laser Spectacles

Sat., July 20, 7:30-9:30 p.m.
Charline McCombs Empire Theatre 226 N. St. Mary's, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$29-$49

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Sure, Pink Floyd is the standard for this kind of shindig. But Starbucks has taught us that all things must come in a million flavors, laser shows being no exception. Live music from Arc Attack, a group that performs on high-tech homemade instruments, will accompany a spectacle that pulls from the visions of Nikola Tesla among others. (210) 226-2891

Genevieve XO

Sat., July 20, 8 p.m.
Limelight 2718 N St. Mary's, San Antonio Central


Given that the promoter is Vibe With Me “An Evening of House and Techno,” it seems safer to assume that this night will offer a chance to dance to a variety of electronic grooves courtesy of Genevieve XO. (210) 995-7229; (210) (FAX)

Bill Ayers Band

Sat., July 20, 8:30 p.m.
Blue Bonnet Palace 17630 Lookout, Selma San Antonio


If you saw this listing and thought, “Finally my chance to see a ’60s radical rock the fuck out,” you may be disappointed. The Bill Ayers in question here fronts a New Braunfels-based outfit that aims to fuse country, ’70s rock, Southern rock and Americana. (210) 651-6702

Midas + Crypt Trip

Sat., July 20, 10 p.m.
Faust Tavern 517 East Woodlawn, San Antonio San Antonio


Detroit’s Midas — a band that rose from the ashes of the equally badass-sounding Bison Machine and Wild Savages — is headed to SA in support of a new self-released cassette called Solid Gold Heavy Metal. The band carries on a classic Detroit hard rock sound distinguished by triumphant and metallic riffage and soaring vocals. Prog/proto-metal rockers Crypt Trip provide able support. (210) 2570628 (FAX); (210)

Gardens & Yoga

Third Saturday of every month, 10-11 a.m.
San Antonio Botanical Garden 555 Funston, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$15


AC Power Yoga pops up at the Botanical Garden for an outdoor class suitable for all ages and skill levels. Attendees are asked to bring a durable yoga mat, sunscreen, water, bug spray and an open mind. (210) 536-1400

Men of Steel, Women of Wonder

Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Wednesdays, Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 1
San Antonio Museum of Art 200 W. Jones Ave., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$12-$20


Evidenced by the global success of recent films such as Black Panther, Avengers: Endgame and Captain Marvel, among many others, the world is still captivated by the concept of superheroes. While less memorable examples might fall within that formulaic realm the New York Times summed up as “mental popcorn, meant to be rapidly consumed and forgotten,” the box office numbers prove we’re still collectively content to sit and watch statuesque freaks of nature fight off evil forces — even when the takeaway is minimal. Long before the schlock of what’s been dubbed “Hollywood’s Comic Book Age,” Superman and Wonder Woman captured imaginations as defenders of humanity fighting injustices amid the backdrops of the Great Depression and WWII. Introduced in 1938 and 1941, respectively, this iconic, spandex-clad pair inspire myriad incarnations in “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder,” an exhibition organized by Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, Arkansas, and landing at the San Antonio Museum of Art this summer. Although it might conjure visions of comic cons and nerdy fan art, the traveling show digs deep into the cultural significance of both figures — and it isn’t an entirely kid-friendly affair. Curated by Alejo Benedetti, the collection of 70-plus paintings, photographs, videos and installations goes beyond the expected depictions of costumed heroism to explore sexuality, immigration, race, idolatry, desire and the very building blocks that made these characters possible. Spanning from the 1930s to the present day, “Men of Steel, Women of Wonder” builds an interpretive timeline in four thematic sections. Encompassing both the reverent and irreverent, the introductory section The Heroes We Know comprises photographer Siri Kaur’s amusing portraits of celebrity impersonators captured in mundane, contemporary contexts, Peter Saul’s playfully surreal painting Superman Versus the Toilet Duck and a provocative yet nostalgic installation by Jim Shaw, The Issue of My Loins, that showcases — and supersizes — Superman’s crotch. Placing the mythical stars in historical context, Origin Stories is reportedly the germinating seed for the entire exhibition. Here, real-life men of steel and women of wonder are presented in etchings of 1930s-era steel workers building the metropolis, photographs of women welding in the Willow Run bomber plant in the 1940s and Norman Rockwell’s 1943 painting of brawny machinist and feminist icon Rosie the Riveter eating a sandwich as the American flag billows in the background. Contrasting God-like power with traces of vulnerability, Glimpsing Humanity places our heroes in unexpected contexts: an alienated Superman reads the paper amid a barren landscape in Llyn Foulkes’ 1991 painting Where Did I Go Wrong and gets lit in Mike Kelley’s 1999 video Superman Recites Selections from “The Bell Jar” and Other Works by Sylvia Plath. Wonder Woman becomes a religious icon in Valetin Popov’s 2009 painting St. Wonder Woman and gets placed In Exile alongside the Virgin Mary, Aphrodite and others in Mary Beth Edelson’s mixed-media painting from 1989. Timely and provocative, the closing section Defender of the Innocent challenges stereotypes of gender and race while importantly reminding that both beloved characters are immigrants (he’s from Krypton, she’s from Themyscira, aka Paradise Island). Sarah Hill addresses the plight of a trans Wonder Woman in the 2014 video They Wonder; late San Antonio artist Mel Casas calls out the lack of diversity in the superhero realm in his painting Humanscape 70 (Comic Whitewash); Superman locks lips with Batman in Rich Simmons’ 2014 mixed-media work Between the Capes; Dulce Pinzón celebrates Mexican immigrants as working-class superheroes in staged photographs; and an installation attributed to the U.S. Department of Illegal Superheroes (ICE DISH) comes complete with a hotline where concerned citizens can report suspicious activity. As host venue, SAMA rises to the heroic occasion with an abundance of complementary programs, including talks with featured artists, weekly gallery talks, workshops, a Superhero Pajama Party (July 26) and outdoor screenings of Black Panther (June 28), Superman: The Movie (July 12), Nacho Libre (July 19), The Incredibles 2 (August 2), Batman (August 6), Wonder Woman (August 9), Birdman (August 16), Lu Over the Wall (August 23) and Superman II (August 30). (210) 978-8100

Juana Córdova, Francis Almendárez, Narcissister

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 8
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


The latest round of Artpace's International Artist-in-Residence program demands to be heard as much as seen. Each of the artists elected by guest curator Karina Aguilera Skvirsky has created visually distinct and seemingly disparate bodies of work, but the exhibitions are united by the presence of sound. For "Chronicles of Uprooting," Juana Córdova (Cuenca, Ecuador) collected samples of tumbleweed, an immigrant plant that made its way to the American West via a shipment of flaxseed from Russia, and achiote seeds, a plant common to the tropics of Latin America that has been used to give flavor and color to food, cosmetics and textiles since the Pre-Columbian era. The space is filled with a gentle droning, provided both by fans that keep three tumbleweeds spinning aloft in transparent tubes and a video installation featuring the frenetic movement of insects. From the winding roads of flattened tumbleweed unspooled on the wall to a diaspora of achiote seeds mounted in a corner, Córdova renders the journeys of immigrant peoples in miniature, metaphorically connecting the movement of flora to human migration worldwide. Francis Almendárez (Houston) focuses on the rhythms of work both commercial and domestic in "rhythm and (p)leisure." Shot in Honduras and El Salvador, the multi-screen video installation is abuzz with the myriad sounds of human tasks, whether it be a man hammering the soles of counterfeit Nike sneakers, a woman gently sweeping a tile floor or a group drumming on a street corner. From the rushed pace of the city to the more leisurely speed of the countryside, Almendárez has captured the processes of human work, both material and immaterial, and reveals how even activities we view as leisure are still "work" in their own right. Piles of clothes on pallets offer the viewer a place to sit or recline, but this is merely a brief respite before the garments reenter the global circulation of sale, resale and disposal. Masked artist Narcissister (New York, New York) is a provocateur whose performance art has been seen in venues from burlesque clubs to America's Got Talent. While functionally silent, the bombastic imagery of the erotic collages included in "Wimmin" are loud in their own way, unapologetically confronting the intersection of femininity, race and sexuality. However, the artist's work also possesses an auditory component that arises when pieces are "activated" (a term she isn't particularly fond of) in performance. During the free opening reception, performances will cycle every half hour, featuring small gestures such as the swishing of the fabric of a formal dress as it's wrapped around a body encased in a bale of aluminum cans and the echoing clank of the pan-eyelids of an assembled face being opened by an anonymous performer, who completes the structure's features with a large, pierced nose worn on her back. (210) 212-4900

"Transcendental Tricentennial: Love Letters to San Anto, the (he)Art of David Zamora Casas"

Mondays-Saturdays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through July 28
Institute of Texan Cultures 801 E César Chávez Blvd, San Antonio San Antonio

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Over the last four decades, self-described “artivist” David Zamora Casas has delighted, shocked and intrigued San Antonio audiences with paintings, installations, altars and performance works that essentially present the artist himself as a canvas. Fusing elements of folk and outsider art with nods to the aesthetics of Frida Kahlo and Salvador Dalí, the DIY spirit of rasquachismo, religious iconography and Latinx and LGBTQ* activism, Casas has established something many artists strive for fruitlessly: an instantly recognizable aesthetic that’s distinctly their own. Nicknamed Nuclear Meltdown and dubbed a “clown shaman” by esteemed author and MacArthur Genius Sandra Cisneros, Casas often makes cameos in his own paintings, his fire-engine red lips, devilish goatee and Dalí-esque mustache emerging from surreal tableaus populated by skulls, deities, monkeys and mermaids swimming amid swirling patterns, Mesoamerican symbols and hand-painted text reminiscent of retablos. In the words of Chicano art specialist Tomas Ybarra-Frausto, Casas’ canvases “mix word and image to visualize autobiographical and universal stories  of homoerotic love, loss and persistent social concerns including immigration, environmental plunder, gender disparity and the multiple issues facing marginalized individuals and communities.” Billed as an artistic explosion of “folk-baroque manifestations” exploring themes ranging from indigenous history to gender fluidity, Casas’ new solo show “Transcendental Tricentennial” comprises “miles of ribbon, yards of fabric, embellished prints, various on-site assemblages, oil and acrylic paintings on canvas, barbed-wire and bone sculptures, and a Día de los Muertos ofrenda which spills into our collective consciousness.” Made possible by a grant from the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), the “mega-installation” also involves creative collaborations with the likes of accordion queen Eva Ybarra and video/film producers Laura Varela and Fadela Gacis Castro. As for its slightly unexpected landing at the Institute of Texan Cultures, Casas reminds that the exhibition evokes the ITC’s mission to be “a lesson in diversity [that] shows the uniqueness and beauty of the many cultures that came to Texas.” (210) 458-2300

Daniel Rios Rodriguez & Raul Gonzalez

Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Saturdays, Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 18
Artpace 445 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


With a powerful trio of exhibitions already on view, Artpace gives us two more reasons to visit this spring with the unveiling of new projects by San Antonio-based artists Daniel Rios Rodriguez and Raul Gonzalez. Although Rodriguez and Gonzalez explore wildly different topics and themes, their bright and bold bodies of work find common ground in playful energy, DIY aesthetics and transformations of commonplace materials. A Houston transplant who earned an MFA from UTSA along with grants from the Sustainable Arts Foundation, the Surdna Foundation and the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC), Gonzalez has long been fixated on the concept of work in many forms — construction, manual labor and his dual roles as a “werking artist” and undeniably cool stay-at-home dad. He’s captured the everyday joys of fatherhood in figurative drawings, celebrated his love for Whataburger and the Houston Astros in paintings and installations, enhanced his exhibitions with energetic, movement-based performances and even danced for 4.3 miles — continuously from downtown to the McNay. With a title lifted from a song by bygone Texas hip-hop duo UGK, his “Front and Back, and Side to Side” promises to transform Artpace’s Main Space windows with a “multi-dimensional mural” rendered in cardboard and colored duct tape. (Cue the selfies). A native of Killeen who earned his MFA from Yale and has exhibited in New York, Chicago, Marfa, Ireland and beyond, Rodriguez takes a tactile approach to small-scale “semi-figurative” paintings inspired by personal experiences and the natural world. Frequently using oddly shaped, homemade panels, he paints scenes and patterns in thick, textural layers, adding organic-looking embellishments such as stones, shells and feathers, and finishing the pieces with earthy frames rendered in found bits of wood, rope, wire and hardware accents. Bringing to mind everything from cave drawings and tribal symbology to folk and outsider art, Rodriguez’s work comes to light in “Bruisers,” his first ever solo show in Texas. Nodding to the battle scars we collect while navigating life on Earth, Rodriguez says the exhibition title also speaks to the surfaces of his paintings, many of which “undergo a lot of heavy hitting and burning and throwing across the floor.” During the opening reception, both artists will give short talks about their work and Artpace will also be rolling out a new Third Thursdays series that kicks off with a rooftop screening of shorts curated by the San Antonio Film Festival ($5-$10, 8pm Thu, May 16). (210) 212-4900

"Bruce Lee Shoes"

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-6 p.m. Continues through July 20
Cinnabar Art Gallery 1420 South Alamo, #147, San Antonio San Antonio


Cinnabar’s latest exhibition showcases the work of Emanuel De Sousa, a Portugese-born, London-based artist who puts a poppy spin on portraiture. In addition to nods to iconic martial artist Bruce Lee and his yellow jumpsuits, De Sousa’s latest series of paintings features porcelain dogs, mylar balloons and other objects plucked from “tiny closed universes where absurd, nonsensical realities make sense.” (210) 557-6073 (FAX); (210)

Looking for Langston

Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11

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Although his resume includes writing and directing credits for the award-winning coming-of-age drama Young Soul Rebels (1991) and the blaxploitation documentary BaadAsssss Cinema (2002), British filmmaker and installation artist Isaac Julien is arguably better known for conceptual films presented on multiple screens simultaneously. Seemingly dissected and left for viewers to reassemble with their own eyes, these immersive projects have involved journeys to remote ice caves in Iceland, juxtapositions of Arctic and African landscapes, travels through China and curious collaborations with the likes of Tilda Swinton and James Franco. A co-founder of the Sankofa Film and Video Collective (an organization “dedicated to developing an independent black film culture in the areas of production, exhibition and audience”), Julien made one of his earliest waves with Looking for Langston — a 1989 film billed as “a lyrical exploration — and recreation — of the private world of poet, social activist, novelist, playwright and columnist Langston Hughes (1902-1967) and his fellow black artists and writers who formed the Harlem Renaissance during the 1920s.” In essence a non-linear homage that presents Hughes as a metaphor for the black gay experience, the film has earned cult status and is taught extensively in universities as part of African-American and queer studies programs. Appointed Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in 2017, Julien was a favorite of late local artist and philanthropist Linda Pace, who acquired more than 50 of his works during her lifetime. In celebration of Looking for Langston’s 30th anniversary, the Linda Pace Foundation’s gallery Studio at Ruby City showcases the 45-minute film as the anchor of a new exhibition of two recently acquired photographs Julien shot during production — Film-Noir Angels and Masquerade No. 3.

Cactus Pear Music Festival

Fridays, Saturdays, 7-9:30 p.m. Continues through July 20
Trinity Baptist Church 319 E. Mulberry, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$5-$28


This year, several changes are in store for Cactus Pear Music Festival. As part of its search for a new Artistic Director to replace Stephanie Sant’Ambrogio, whose last season with Cactus Pear will be in 2021, the two finalists — both former winners of the San Antonio International Piano Competition (now the Gurwitz Piano Competition) — will each serve as a guest festival artist as well as guest artistic director for week two of the festival in this and next year. This summer, 2016 SAIPC Gold Medalist Scott Cuellar takes the helm, and will perform for all four main festival concerts: “Into the Twilight” (July 12), “Baying at the Moon” (July 13), “Goethe Have Music” (July 19) and “Romancing the Notes” (July 20). Cactus Pear is also introducing two free Casual Classix concerts, opening the festival with “Bulgarian Bad Boyz, Brahms and Beer” (6 p.m. Wednesday, July 10, Bar 414, 205 E. Houston) and a caffeinated matinee before the final festival concert that they’re calling “French Roast: Debussy, Ravel and Duparc” (3 p.m. Saturday, July 20, Summer Moon Coffee Bar, 3233 N. St. Mary’s St.). In addition to Cuellar and current director Sant’Ambrogio, artists on deck include members of the San Antonio Symphony such as Jeff Garza, French horn, and Ilya Shterenberg, clarinet, as well as visiting artists Carol Cook, viola; Lachezar Kostov, cello; Viktor Valkov, piano; Timothy Jones, baritone; Ellen DePasquale, violin; and more. (210) 733-6201

Beauty and the Beast

Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m., Sundays, 3 p.m. and Thu., July 25, 7 p.m. Continues through July 28
Woodlawn Theatre 1920 Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$18-$30


Based on the Academy Award-winning animated feature, The classic story tells of Belle, a young woman in a provincial town, and the Beast, who is really a young prince trapped under the spell of an enchantress. If the Beast can learn to love and be loved, the curse will end and he will be transformed into his former self. But time is running out. If the Beast does not learn his lesson soon, he and his household will be doomed for all eternity. (210) 267-8388

Roald Dahl's Matilda The Musical

Thursdays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through Aug. 11
The Public Theater of San Antonio 800 W. Ashby Pl., San Antonio Central

Buy Tickets$20-$45


Most fans of Roald Dahl’s Matilda can agree that the scene in which “Poor Brucey” is forced by Miss Trunbull to consume an entire, Willy Wonka-sized chocolate cake as punishment for stealing a single piece is one of the most memorable moments from the story. In the novel, the titular heroine defeats such evil with words — and telekinesis, of course — but the musical adaptation offers the chance to experience the magic in song. Born to the Wormwood family in the whirlwind of ballroom dancing with a dip and a little foxtrot, the child genius Matilda erupts from the gloom of her cruel childhood as a miracle with bravado and pizzazz. Believe it or not, Matilda actually shares the record for most Olivier awards won by a musical with Hamilton! Although Mara Wilson certainly won’t be reprising her filmic role, Matilda will spunkily take her adolescent revolution to the Public Theatre stage, played by Taylor Henderson and Audrey Davis. (210) 733-7258

An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe

Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. Continues through July 27
The Gregg Barrios Theater at the Overtime 5409 Bandera Road, Suite 205, San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$10-$15


This one-man show will take audiences into the fading mind of the acclaimed dark Romantic poet and author Edgar Allan Poe as he wanders the streets of Baltimore in his feverish final week on Earth. Written, produced and starring Derek Berlin, a native San Antonian and lifelong performer, An Evening with Edgar Allan Poe’s “macabre” look into the tortured man’s “purgatorial” musings ought to find a nice home at the Overtime Theater, best known for its penchant for the weird and its willingness to offer the stage to eclectics and their experiments. Let’s see how well Berlin’s latest project can measure up to the granddaddy of Gothic fiction himself. (210) 557-7562

2019 SUP (Standup Paddleboard) Festival

Fri., July 19, 12-11 p.m. and Sat., July 20, 8 a.m.-11 p.m.
Horseshoe Bay Golf Resort 200 H. Circle North, Horseshoe Bay San Antonio

Buy Tickets$279


A Signature Event, the SUP Festival encourages you to bring your friends lakeside for a weekend at the Horseshoe Bay Resort. The weekend features fun-filled activities including paddleboard yoga, a musically-charged open float with a live DJ and festive glow paddles to light up Lake LBJ. 8305982511

Z Fest 2019

Fri., July 19, 5-11:45 p.m. and Sat., July 20, 5-11:45 p.m.
Imagine Books and Records 8373 Culebra Rd, San Antonio San Antonio


Z Fest is a annual multi-genre, 2 night music festival put on and created by BlueJay Records. (210) 236-7668

Gemini Ink Writers Conference

Sat., July 20, 8 a.m.-5:15 p.m. and Sun., July 21, 8 a.m.-7 p.m.
El Tropicano Riverwalk Hotel 110 Lexington Ave, San Antonio San Antonio


The Fourth Annual Gemini Ink Writers Conference will take place at the El Tropicano Riverwalk Hotel from July 19-21. This year’s featured authors include Andrea VOCAB Sanderson, Pablo Miguel Martínez, Analicia Sotelo, Camille Acker, Andre Dubus III, and Ira Sukrungruang. Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in 37 different panels and 5 different workshops. Register at geminiink.org/conference-registration or by phone at (210) 734-9673. (210) 223-9267

Free Fitness Class on the Plaza with Mobile OM

Sat., July 20, 9-10 a.m.
Tobin Center for the Performing Arts 100 Auditorium Circle, San Antonio River Walk

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Breathe and de-stress with a healing dose of yoga on the beautiful Riverwalk Plaza. This 60 minute class hatha flow class is designed to accommodate all levels of practice and will leave you feeling refreshed and rejuvenated for the rest of your day. (210) 223-8624

Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Celebration

Sat., July 20, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.
Scobee Education Center 1819 N. Main Ave., San Antonio San Antonio

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July 20th marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Join the Scobee Education Center in celebrating this historic event. There will be fun hands on activities for all ages, robotics, drones, guest speakers, STEM resources, vendors and more. (210) 486-0100

ACTS Missions Christmas in July Craft Fair

Sat., July 20, 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Whitley Conference Center 285 Oblate Dr., San Antonio Downtown


The 2nd annual Christmas in July Fair at the Whitley Theological Center will offer the opportunity to purchase from a variety of local artists and crafters selling handcrafted items, including jewelry, wreaths, clothing, purses, paintings, chocolate, makeup, decorations, accessories and gifts. The event is indoors. Parking is free. There will be an acceptance of $5 love donations at the door. A food truck will be available serving lunch courtesy of Hondo's BBQ. Proceeds benefit ACTS Missions. (210) 342-1077 x129

Kids Garden Club: Miniature Glow Gardens

Sat., July 20, 10-11 a.m.
Rainbow Gardens-Thousand Oaks 2585 Thousand Oaks Dr., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$7


Everyone loved the Glow In The Dark Miniature Gardens last year so Rainbow Gardens decided to host it again. Kids will make a miniature garden with a plant, decorations and some glow in the dark miniatures. Be sure to sign up right away beacuse the seats go fast! Ages 4-10. (210) 680-5734

Teen Workshop: Superhero Collage (Ages 11 to 17)

Sat., July 20, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
San Antonio Museum of Art 200 W. Jones Ave., San Antonio San Antonio

Buy Tickets$65-$80


Boom! Pow! Blam! Come learn how to make your stories POP in this comic book collage workshop! After visiting the special exhibition Men of Steel, Women of Wonder, compose your own superhero narrative in one scene using comic-artist styles and techniques. Participants will also be invited to screen print their own souvenir tote bag or poster. Teen workshops are led by professional artist-educators and include a tour in the museum in addition to instruction in a variety of art techniques and media. Fee covers all materials. Caregivers must provide lunch and transportation for students. The ticket price for non-members is $80 and for members it is $65. (210) 978-8100

Teen Workshop: Comic Splash Page Collage (Ages 11-17)

Sat., July 20, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
San Antonio Museum of Art 200 W. Jones Ave., San Antonio San Antonio


Boom! Pow! Blam! Come learn how to make your stories pop in this comic book collage workshop! After visiting our special exhibition Men of Steel, Women of Wonder, compose your own superhero narrative in one scene using comic-artist styles and techniques. Participants will also be invited to screen print their own souvenir tote bag or poster. Teen workshops are led by professional artist-educators and include a tour in the museum, instruction in a variety of art techniques and media. Fee covers all materials. Students will need to bring their own sack lunch and water bottle. This event is $80 and $65 for members. (210) 978-8100

Sounds Of Wax Summer Record Show

Sat., July 20, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.
Wonderland of the Americas 4522 Fredericksburg, San Antonio San Antonio


Sounds of Wax Record Show presents: Summer 2019 Record Show. The event will have vinyl records, both album and 45s, as well as, 8tracks, cassettes, toys, CD’s and DVDs. There will be refreshments available provided by vendors and free parking for everyone in attendance. The event’s location will be at the Wonderland of the America’s Mall in San Antonio, Texas. The mall has been a local staple and often holds community events like the Sounds on Wax Record Show. 2107853500

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