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Superior spring rolls, delicious grilled quail, and oustanding duck hot pot. Call ahead for Vietnamese specialties, including duck, goat, and seafood hot pot. -- Mark Jones (12/08)
Goro's Sushi is one of San Antonio's most popular Japanese dining experiences due to the unusual rolls that chef Goro creates using only the freshest fish.
One of the running jokes in National Public Radio's "Prairie Home Companion" is the reticence of the folks of Lake Wobegone. In the taciturn Wobegone World there seem to be no superlatives, only "pretty goods" and "not so bads." There is not, you betcha, a sushi bar in Lake Wobegone. For obvious reasons. But if the Marriott Rivercenter's Hanatei were there, "pretty good" and "not so bad" would be about bang-on. The same terminology goes for San Antonio, a city not necessarily known for its reluctance to express an opinion. Hanatei is the kind of place that seems perfectly competent, without inspiring either superlatives or invectives. - Ron Bechtol
Koi Kawa Japanese Restaurant and Sushi Bar on Broadway creates the most palatable palette of sushi this side of the San Antonio River — unless you're looking for atmosphere, which clearly is the domain of Niki's Tokyo Inn. But back to Koi Kawa: Choice cuts of chilled tuna, mackerel, salmon, shrimp, squid, and octopus rest delicately upon lightly vinegared beds of sticky white rice, or are skillfully tucked into rice and rolled in crisp skins of seaweed. In a delicious display of sushi chef artistry, mouthwatering medleys of avocado, cucumber, green onion, and smelt eggs meld with raw seafood for a refreshingly fresh fish dish. For all the simplicity of sushi, Koi Kawa complicates flavors beautifully with specialty rolls. - Wendi Kimura
Niki’s carpet is older than our President, which may discourage you from the traditional seating areas, but settle in the pink naugahyde bar chairs and sample fresh, traditional sushi sans gimmicks. Put yourself in the chef’s hands.
Samurai Sushi shines with some seafood dishes, and stumbles over certain sushi rolls, but delivers value and freshness on all fronts. The uni was particularly fresh, and the Seafood Dynamite lived up to its name. -- Ron Bechtol (01/09)
When you enter Sushi Zushi, assuming it's not a jam-packed Saturday night, you'll be greeted with a chorus of shouts in Japanese from the waitstaff and sushi chefs. As startling as it may seem (and many potential diners took great pains to ignore it), "Welcome!" is their message. (Irasshaimase!, if you prefer.) Yes, with exclamation points. And it's typical of the restaurant's enthusiastic attitude. Get used to it. ;The exuberance spills over into other areas as well. Despite a pleasant, minimalist decor featuring melon-toned walls, a laminate floor intended to emulate wide-board pine, and some black-and-white images of the sushi-making art, SZ doesn't come across as understated shibui. You can't sit at a counter to watch sushi masters assemble your order with deft hand and quiet dignity. In the place of deferential waitresses in traditional garb, there are kids in grey polos and black pants. And numerous items on the almost intimidatingly long menu, feature chipotle mayonnaise. Get used to that, too. - Ron Bechtol
When you enter Sushi Zushi in the Colonnade, assuming it's not a jam-packed Saturday night, you'll be greeted with a chorus of shouts in Japanese from the waitstaff and sushi chefs. As startling as it may seem (and many potential diners took great pains to ignore it), "Welcome!" is their message. (Irasshaimase!, if you prefer.) Yes, with exclamation points. And it's typical of the restaurant's enthusiastic attitude. Get used to it. ;The exuberance spills over into other areas as well. Despite a pleasant, minimalist decor featuring melon-toned walls, a laminate floor intended to emulate wide-board pine, and some black-and-white images of the sushi-making art, SZ doesn't come across as understated shibui. You can't sit at a counter to watch sushi masters assemble your order with deft hand and quiet dignity. In the place of deferential waitresses in traditional garb, there are kids in grey polos and black pants. And numerous items on the almost intimidatingly long menu, feature chipotle mayonnaise. Get used to that, too. - Ron Bechtol
When you enter Sushi Zushi, assuming it's not a jam-packed Saturday night, you'll be greeted with a chorus of shouts in Japanese from the waitstaff and sushi chefs. As startling as it may seem (and many potential diners took great pains to ignore it), "Welcome!" is their message. (Irasshaimase!, if you prefer.) Yes, with exclamation points. And it's typical of the restaurant's enthusiastic attitude. Get used to it. The exuberance spills over into other areas as well. Despite a pleasant, minimalist decor featuring melon-toned walls, a laminate floor intended to emulate wide-board pine, and some black-and-white images of the sushi-making art, SZ doesn't come across as understated shibui. You can't sit at a counter to watch sushi masters assemble your order with deft hand and quiet dignity. In the place of deferential waitresses in traditional garb, there are kids in grey polos and black pants. And numerous items on the almost intimidatingly long menu, feature chipotle mayonnaise. Get used to that, too. - Ron Bechtol
At a time when the world's oceans are becoming depleted, it's at once odd and altogether understandable that sushi continues to rise in popularity. Presumably pristine, there is also a paradoxical whiff of decadence about it (the Japanese have long considered seafoods to be aphrodisiacs, by the way); salmon and shrimp may be farmed successfully, but don't expect aquaculture to bring us tuna any time soon. The purpose of this introduction is not to instill guilt, but rather to make us realize the value of what we have - while we have it. And a platter of unadorned sushi is perhaps the best possible way to understand the virtue of impeccably fresh seafood simply presented. Sushihana's menu of sushis, sashimis, rolls, and handrolls totals 68 offerings, and if you have favorites, by all means go for them. Both flying fish and smelt roe are available, as are five kinds of tuna, from deep-red toro to super-white slices. Another way to whet the palate is to order a sashimi or sushi assortment. They are available both as appetizers or as a dinner accompanied by miso soup or salad. - Ron Bechtol
Enjoy San Antonio's freshest and most creative sushi. Each plate is a work of art, as our Sushi Chef, Joseph Schmuck, utilizes only the highest grade sahsimi grade fish and features a presentation available no where else in town. Finally, San Antonio, has a place for sushi lovers that is on par with the finest sushi restaurants in Los Angeles, New York or Tokyo. Syn also features San Antonio's first and only robata bar. In addition to our food, our bar serves beer, sake, and wine—the perfect addition to any meal. Experience professional service and savory meals every time you visit SYN Sushi & Robata Bar.
The Skinny Careful selection will yield dependable cuisine at this SA Broadway staple. Don’t miss the special lotus-root salad, and marvel at the fine wine selection.
Wasabi may be willing but the fish is weak; even the better cuts feel too expensive for what you get. Seared scallops and some maki rolls are saving graces, as is the Sho Chiko Bai Nigori sake. -- Ron Bechtol, 01/08
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