November 08, 2017

Fun Things to Do in San Antonio This Week (11/8-11/14)

From music shows and art installations to festivals and performances, these are all the places you should be this week. Here how to make sure you're keeping up with the Current.
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Thu 11/9
Sadistik
As mumble rap and trap rap continues to survive without their artists actually rapping, folks in the underground and alternative rap communities across the planet continue to write bars and hold sacred the true art form of hip-hop, you know, writing lyrics. Seattle’s Sadistik is one of these rappers. “Chemical Burns,” a track that came out in 2014, which features the late rapper Eyedea, is probably the best example of Sadistik’s honest lyricism and skill level as a rapper as the track is in 6/8 time – a tough time signature for most lesser MCs. “Less that you know, the less that you feel / I’m cursed with intelligence I can’t heal / kneel, kill, death to the bourgeois / proletariat with the new song / noose on a bony neck / loneliness, opiate and a bruised jaw.” With Nacho Picasso, Rafael Vigilantics, Upgrade, $7-$12, 9pm, Limelight, 2718 N. St. Mary’s St., thelimelightsa.com. – Chris Conde
Oliver Booking
Thu 11/9
Sadistik

As mumble rap and trap rap continues to survive without their artists actually rapping, folks in the underground and alternative rap communities across the planet continue to write bars and hold sacred the true art form of hip-hop, you know, writing lyrics. Seattle’s Sadistik is one of these rappers. “Chemical Burns,” a track that came out in 2014, which features the late rapper Eyedea, is probably the best example of Sadistik’s honest lyricism and skill level as a rapper as the track is in 6/8 time – a tough time signature for most lesser MCs. “Less that you know, the less that you feel / I’m cursed with intelligence I can’t heal / kneel, kill, death to the bourgeois / proletariat with the new song / noose on a bony neck / loneliness, opiate and a bruised jaw.” With Nacho Picasso, Rafael Vigilantics, Upgrade, $7-$12, 9pm, Limelight, 2718 N. St. Mary’s St., thelimelightsa.com. – Chris Conde
Thu 11/9
International Artist-in-Residence Exhibitions
If Artpace’s renowned International Artist-in-Residence program and its entirely unpredictable exhibition series have taught San Antonio anything, it’s to expect the unexpected. While exhibitions here often push viewers beyond the comfort zones museums might offer, the institution Linda Pace left behind never fails to spark conversations about art, commerce, concepts, aesthetics, politics and points in between. Carrying on a yearlong string of practicing artists guest-curating the series (which annually invites three guest curators to each select a trio of artists — one from Texas, one from elsewhere in the U.S. and one from abroad — to “live and create art in San Antonio for two months”), Brooklyn/Austin-based Michael Smith summoned a performative and collaborative spirit by uniting Heyd Fontenot (Dallas), Martha Wilson (New York) and Lili Reynaud-Dewar (France/Switzerland). A truly versatile artist whose work tackles cultural norms, spirituality, morality and sexuality, Fontenot is perhaps known best for paintings and drawings that put an intimate, slightly playful spin on portraiture, but he’s spent his time at Artpace building an “occupied installation” that invites both exploration and interpretation. Having creatively investigated unlikely intersections between Martin Luther King Jr., cyborgs and blinged-out teeth covers known commonly as “grills,” Reynaud-Dewar went west to shoot a short horror film amid the stark, dramatic vistas of Marfa. Hailed as a pioneering feminist artist who founded the avant-garde art space Franklin Furnace in New York circa 1976, Wilson expanded her “First Ladies” self-portrait series with a new video piece in which she stars as Melania Trump. Free, 6-9pm (on view through Dec. 31), Artpace, 445 N. Main Ave., (210) 212-4900, artpace.org. — Bryan Rindfuss
Lili Renaud Dewar
Thu 11/9
International Artist-in-Residence Exhibitions

If Artpace’s renowned International Artist-in-Residence program and its entirely unpredictable exhibition series have taught San Antonio anything, it’s to expect the unexpected. While exhibitions here often push viewers beyond the comfort zones museums might offer, the institution Linda Pace left behind never fails to spark conversations about art, commerce, concepts, aesthetics, politics and points in between. Carrying on a yearlong string of practicing artists guest-curating the series (which annually invites three guest curators to each select a trio of artists — one from Texas, one from elsewhere in the U.S. and one from abroad — to “live and create art in San Antonio for two months”), Brooklyn/Austin-based Michael Smith summoned a performative and collaborative spirit by uniting Heyd Fontenot (Dallas), Martha Wilson (New York) and Lili Reynaud-Dewar (France/Switzerland). A truly versatile artist whose work tackles cultural norms, spirituality, morality and sexuality, Fontenot is perhaps known best for paintings and drawings that put an intimate, slightly playful spin on portraiture, but he’s spent his time at Artpace building an “occupied installation” that invites both exploration and interpretation. Having creatively investigated unlikely intersections between Martin Luther King Jr., cyborgs and blinged-out teeth covers known commonly as “grills,” Reynaud-Dewar went west to shoot a short horror film amid the stark, dramatic vistas of Marfa. Hailed as a pioneering feminist artist who founded the avant-garde art space Franklin Furnace in New York circa 1976, Wilson expanded her “First Ladies” self-portrait series with a new video piece in which she stars as Melania Trump. Free, 6-9pm (on view through Dec. 31), Artpace, 445 N. Main Ave., (210) 212-4900, artpace.org. — Bryan Rindfuss
Thu 11/9
Our Lady Peace
Our Lady Peace arose in the sweet ambiguous time where literally any music that wasn’t hip-hop, metal or country was classified “alternative.” From Smashing Pumpkins to Tool and even bands like Third Eye Blind and Our Lady Peace, “alternative” music was the laziest way for industry people to say, “Hey, this isn’t Backstreet Boys or Wu-Tang Clan.” Sounding like they could probably be on tour with bands like Collective Soul and Eve 6, Our Lady Peace formed in Toronto in the early '90s and quickly experienced success which, contrast to many of their Canadian rock counterparts, continued to thrive on through the 2000s. The band is on tour in support of their new album Somethingness which will be released in the form of two EPs. The first volume (released back in August) actually sounds pretty good, which is relatively surprising for a band from the ’90s and a testament to the quality songwriting of frontman Raine Maida. $33-$44, 7pm, Aztec Theatre, 104 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 812-4355, theaztectheatre.com. – Chris Conde
Ashley Osborn
Thu 11/9
Our Lady Peace

Our Lady Peace arose in the sweet ambiguous time where literally any music that wasn’t hip-hop, metal or country was classified “alternative.” From Smashing Pumpkins to Tool and even bands like Third Eye Blind and Our Lady Peace, “alternative” music was the laziest way for industry people to say, “Hey, this isn’t Backstreet Boys or Wu-Tang Clan.” Sounding like they could probably be on tour with bands like Collective Soul and Eve 6, Our Lady Peace formed in Toronto in the early '90s and quickly experienced success which, contrast to many of their Canadian rock counterparts, continued to thrive on through the 2000s. The band is on tour in support of their new album Somethingness which will be released in the form of two EPs. The first volume (released back in August) actually sounds pretty good, which is relatively surprising for a band from the ’90s and a testament to the quality songwriting of frontman Raine Maida. $33-$44, 7pm, Aztec Theatre, 104 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 812-4355, theaztectheatre.com. – Chris Conde
Thu 11/9
Havana Hi-Fi with DJ Steven Lee Moya
Every Thursday at Hotel Havana, DJ Steven Lee Moya presents Havana Hi-Fi — an evening exploring the wide and diverse musical world of Afrocentric rhythms. According to the DJ it’s “where Fela Kuti meets James Brown.” Guests can expect afro-latin jazz, afrofunk, afrobeat, afro-brazilian and all things exotica during his weekly, three-hour excursion. Known by many as one of San Antonio’s high profile experts in all things lounge, Moya curates his sets with the same precision as his fashion flare — with class and sophistication. For six years strong, it’s been afro-cool vibes, cocktails, bites, and ambiance at Havana Hi-Fi, perfect for a date night or a swanky cocktail outing with the crew. Free, 8-11pm, Hotel Havana Bar, 1015 Navarro St., (210) 222-2008, havanasanantonio.com. – JJ Lopez
Puro Pinche
Thu 11/9
Havana Hi-Fi with DJ Steven Lee Moya
Every Thursday at Hotel Havana, DJ Steven Lee Moya presents Havana Hi-Fi — an evening exploring the wide and diverse musical world of Afrocentric rhythms. According to the DJ it’s “where Fela Kuti meets James Brown.” Guests can expect afro-latin jazz, afrofunk, afrobeat, afro-brazilian and all things exotica during his weekly, three-hour excursion. Known by many as one of San Antonio’s high profile experts in all things lounge, Moya curates his sets with the same precision as his fashion flare — with class and sophistication. For six years strong, it’s been afro-cool vibes, cocktails, bites, and ambiance at Havana Hi-Fi, perfect for a date night or a swanky cocktail outing with the crew. Free, 8-11pm, Hotel Havana Bar, 1015 Navarro St., (210) 222-2008, havanasanantonio.com. – JJ Lopez
Thu 11/9
Los Lobos
In a musical landscape littered with “genreless” artists, Los Lobos stand out as fusionist pioneers with an undying love of experimentation. Rising out of ’70s-era East LA with a repertoire that blurred blues, roots and Mexican folkloric sounds, the group scored a Grammy before their major label debut (1984’s How Will the Wolf Survive?) and reached the masses in 1987 with a chart-topping cover of Ritchie Valens’ classic “La Bamba.” Touted by critics for their surreal 1992 album Kiko, the band returns to Gruene Hall for an evening sure to be peppered with eclectic favorites spanning four decades, along with hidden gems from their latest (2015’s Gates of Gold) and hopefully the whimsical 2009 tribute Los Lobos Goes Disney. Fans can help shape Thursday’s set list by requesting songs at loslobos.org. $35, 8pm, Gruene Hall, 1281 Gruene Road, New Braunfels, (830) 606-1281, gruenehall.com. — Bryan Rindfuss
Drew Reynolds
Thu 11/9
Los Lobos

In a musical landscape littered with “genreless” artists, Los Lobos stand out as fusionist pioneers with an undying love of experimentation. Rising out of ’70s-era East LA with a repertoire that blurred blues, roots and Mexican folkloric sounds, the group scored a Grammy before their major label debut (1984’s How Will the Wolf Survive?) and reached the masses in 1987 with a chart-topping cover of Ritchie Valens’ classic “La Bamba.” Touted by critics for their surreal 1992 album Kiko, the band returns to Gruene Hall for an evening sure to be peppered with eclectic favorites spanning four decades, along with hidden gems from their latest (2015’s Gates of Gold) and hopefully the whimsical 2009 tribute Los Lobos Goes Disney. Fans can help shape Thursday’s set list by requesting songs at loslobos.org. $35, 8pm, Gruene Hall, 1281 Gruene Road, New Braunfels, (830) 606-1281, gruenehall.com. — Bryan Rindfuss
Fri 11/10
Spurs vs. Bucks
Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo returns to San Antonio on Friday night, riding a wave of early season MVP hype fueled by phenomenal play. The Greek Freak has taken a leap in his fifth NBA campaign, putting up stellar numbers for a Milwaukee team intent on staking its claim in an underwhelming Eastern Conference. After a solid start, the Spurs offense has shown signs of sputtering on the road, with turnovers and injuries to key personnel ultimately taking their toll. It will take a team effort from San Antonio to slow down Antetokounmpo, and a healthy Kawhi Leonard would be a good start. Consistent contributions from Dejounte Murray and Patty Mills at the point could help right the ship for the Spurs until NBA Finals MVP Tony Parker is cleared to return. $13-$1,474, 8pm, AT&T Center, One AT&T Center Pkwy., (210) 444-5000, attcenter.com. — M. Solis
Courtesy
Fri 11/10
Spurs vs. Bucks

Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo returns to San Antonio on Friday night, riding a wave of early season MVP hype fueled by phenomenal play. The Greek Freak has taken a leap in his fifth NBA campaign, putting up stellar numbers for a Milwaukee team intent on staking its claim in an underwhelming Eastern Conference. After a solid start, the Spurs offense has shown signs of sputtering on the road, with turnovers and injuries to key personnel ultimately taking their toll. It will take a team effort from San Antonio to slow down Antetokounmpo, and a healthy Kawhi Leonard would be a good start. Consistent contributions from Dejounte Murray and Patty Mills at the point could help right the ship for the Spurs until NBA Finals MVP Tony Parker is cleared to return. $13-$1,474, 8pm, AT&T Center, One AT&T Center Pkwy., (210) 444-5000, attcenter.com. — M. Solis
Fri 11/10
Flamenco Legends
In the 1970s, Paco de Lucía revolutionized the art of flamenco. Along with his virtuosic guitar playing, de Lucía incorporated the Afro-Peruvian sounds of the cajón, and collaborated with musicians as far-ranging as Al Di Meola, Chick Corea and Carlos Santana. On Friday, longtime de Lucía collaborator and producer Javier Limón will reassemble the band that toured with the guitar master during the last 10 years of his life for a performance at the Empire. In May of 2012, de Lucía played his final U.S. tour date at Austin’s Riverbend Centre before his untimely death two years later. If you were lucky enough to catch that show, then you’re familiar with the magnitude of talent this ensemble boasts, from guitarist Antonio Sánchez (who happens to be de Lucía’s nephew) to vocalist David de Jacoba and dancer Farruco (the brother of the great flamenco dancer Farruquito). Beyond a mere tribute band, the Paco de Lucía Project honors the legacy of this musical genius while blazing a new trail for the future of flamenco. $29-$99, 7:30pm, Charline McCombs Empire Theatre, 226 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 226-3333, artssa.org. — Marco Aquino
Courtesy
Fri 11/10
Flamenco Legends

In the 1970s, Paco de Lucía revolutionized the art of flamenco. Along with his virtuosic guitar playing, de Lucía incorporated the Afro-Peruvian sounds of the cajón, and collaborated with musicians as far-ranging as Al Di Meola, Chick Corea and Carlos Santana. On Friday, longtime de Lucía collaborator and producer Javier Limón will reassemble the band that toured with the guitar master during the last 10 years of his life for a performance at the Empire. In May of 2012, de Lucía played his final U.S. tour date at Austin’s Riverbend Centre before his untimely death two years later. If you were lucky enough to catch that show, then you’re familiar with the magnitude of talent this ensemble boasts, from guitarist Antonio Sánchez (who happens to be de Lucía’s nephew) to vocalist David de Jacoba and dancer Farruco (the brother of the great flamenco dancer Farruquito). Beyond a mere tribute band, the Paco de Lucía Project honors the legacy of this musical genius while blazing a new trail for the future of flamenco. $29-$99, 7:30pm, Charline McCombs Empire Theatre, 226 N. St. Mary’s St., (210) 226-3333, artssa.org. — Marco Aquino
Fri 11/10
Ariel Pink
If you’re not familiar with the psycho-sexiness of Ariel Pink, you’re missing out on life. OK, maybe not life, but definitely an amazing artist who has some dope tracks and a stellar live show to bring those tracks to life. The artist’s expansive discography includes dreamy tracks like “Life in L.A.” off Worn Copy, to the experimental sounds of Thrash and Burn, to the poppy sounds of Pink’s most recent album, pom pom, and of course, a fan favorite, Before Today (technically Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti, but still a classic). Former Current music editor Matt Stieb reviewed the 2015 show saying “Pink is a master of the skit, throwing voicemails and cell phone conversations into his Jeff Koons pop. For “Black Ballerina’s” strip club scene, Pink, the bikini-drummer and keyboard player Jorge Elbrecht traded off on lines, dropping gems like “Hi Billy, how do you like the number one strip club in L.A?” and “Uhh... I like your areolas baby” before returning to the body of the song.” You can guarantee to see us at this show for sure. $21.75, 8pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. – Chris Conde
Sasha Eisenman
Fri 11/10
Ariel Pink

If you’re not familiar with the psycho-sexiness of Ariel Pink, you’re missing out on life. OK, maybe not life, but definitely an amazing artist who has some dope tracks and a stellar live show to bring those tracks to life. The artist’s expansive discography includes dreamy tracks like “Life in L.A.” off Worn Copy, to the experimental sounds of Thrash and Burn, to the poppy sounds of Pink’s most recent album, pom pom, and of course, a fan favorite, Before Today (technically Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti, but still a classic). Former Current music editor Matt Stieb reviewed the 2015 show saying “Pink is a master of the skit, throwing voicemails and cell phone conversations into his Jeff Koons pop. For “Black Ballerina’s” strip club scene, Pink, the bikini-drummer and keyboard player Jorge Elbrecht traded off on lines, dropping gems like “Hi Billy, how do you like the number one strip club in L.A?” and “Uhh... I like your areolas baby” before returning to the body of the song.” You can guarantee to see us at this show for sure. $21.75, 8pm, Paper Tiger, 2410 N. St. Mary’s St., papertigersatx.com. – Chris Conde
Fri 11/10 - Sat 11/11
San Antonio’s Historic Market Square
Locals and tourists alike are likely to have colorful memories of San Antonio’s historic Market Square in central downtown. South Texas native Edna Campos Gravenhorst has released a book delving into the history and significance of the 210’s “El Mercado,” titled San Antonio’s Historic Market Square. She’s an established author and certified San Antonio tourism ambassador (so basically, she knows her stuff). As the book informs the reader, San Antonio’s founding in 1718 prompted a demand for plazas with businesses and parks. The city’s growth meant relocating the established markets, eventually giving way to a farmers market that developed into the Market Square we now know for its shops, tourist stops and late-night bites at Mi Tierra. Gravenhorst will be signing copies of her book and giving presentations this week at The Twig Book Shop (free, 5-7pm Fri, 306 Pearl Pkwy., Suite 106) and Dead Tree Bookstore (free, 2-4pm Sat, 5645 S. Flores St., Suite 105). — Kelsey Valadez
Courtesy
Fri 11/10 - Sat 11/11
San Antonio’s Historic Market Square

Locals and tourists alike are likely to have colorful memories of San Antonio’s historic Market Square in central downtown. South Texas native Edna Campos Gravenhorst has released a book delving into the history and significance of the 210’s “El Mercado,” titled San Antonio’s Historic Market Square. She’s an established author and certified San Antonio tourism ambassador (so basically, she knows her stuff). As the book informs the reader, San Antonio’s founding in 1718 prompted a demand for plazas with businesses and parks. The city’s growth meant relocating the established markets, eventually giving way to a farmers market that developed into the Market Square we now know for its shops, tourist stops and late-night bites at Mi Tierra. Gravenhorst will be signing copies of her book and giving presentations this week at The Twig Book Shop (free, 5-7pm Fri, 306 Pearl Pkwy., Suite 106) and Dead Tree Bookstore (free, 2-4pm Sat, 5645 S. Flores St., Suite 105). — Kelsey Valadez
Sat 11/11
‘Partners in Art’
With the confluence of Luminaria and Southtown The Arts District (STAD) Festival, November’s Second Saturday art walk promises to be a creative affair to remember. Bringing a dose of fresh blood to the Freight Gallery & Studios complex, the simply titled, artist-run Southtown Art Gallery opens its doors with “Partners in Art,” a group show uniting 14 emerging artists that gallery co-directors Albert Gonzales and Caroline Adam say aren’t “typically accustomed to working together.” Bringing together names both familiar (portrait artist Kaldric Deshon Dow and retro-digital collage specialist Acidwinzip among them) and no-so-familiar (including illustrator Gilbert Martinez, tattoo artist Esther Quiara and painter Elias Vieyra), the inaugural outing’s billed as “a celebration of vigilance — and those who take justice into their own hands to change the world.” $1-$2, 6:30-10:30pm, Southtown Art Gallery, 1913 S. Flores St., Studio 9, (210) 441-0075, facebook.com/southtownartgallery. — Bryan Rindfuss
Courtesy
Sat 11/11
‘Partners in Art’

With the confluence of Luminaria and Southtown The Arts District (STAD) Festival, November’s Second Saturday art walk promises to be a creative affair to remember. Bringing a dose of fresh blood to the Freight Gallery & Studios complex, the simply titled, artist-run Southtown Art Gallery opens its doors with “Partners in Art,” a group show uniting 14 emerging artists that gallery co-directors Albert Gonzales and Caroline Adam say aren’t “typically accustomed to working together.” Bringing together names both familiar (portrait artist Kaldric Deshon Dow and retro-digital collage specialist Acidwinzip among them) and no-so-familiar (including illustrator Gilbert Martinez, tattoo artist Esther Quiara and painter Elias Vieyra), the inaugural outing’s billed as “a celebration of vigilance — and those who take justice into their own hands to change the world.” $1-$2, 6:30-10:30pm, Southtown Art Gallery, 1913 S. Flores St., Studio 9, (210) 441-0075, facebook.com/southtownartgallery. — Bryan Rindfuss