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"Something to Say" 

When: Thursdays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through May 6 2018
Price: $5-$10 ($10 surcharge for "Something to Say")
www.mcnayart.org/exhibitions/upcoming/something-to-say-the-mcnay-presents-100-years-of-african-american-art
The McNay Art Museum has always housed arguably San Antonio’s finest collection of modern art and attracted damn fine visiting exhibitions to boot. But, over the past year and a half, owing in no small part to the bold, forward-thinking vision and useful connections of new director Richard Aste, the McNay has really been on a roll. Showing no signs of losing momentum, the museum is set to open three compelling new exhibitions on February 8 (all of which will run through May 6). “Something to Say: The McNay Presents 100 Years of African American Art” marks the museum’s first survey of modern and contemporary African-American art. Encouraging a thoughtful consideration of the plurality of African-American experience and expression, the exhibit represents the McNay’s ongoing commitment to “equity, inclusion, and social consciousness as well as artistic excellence.” “30 Americans: Rubell Family Collection” boasts some of the most important African-American artists of the past three decades, including Mark Bradford, Nick Cave, Robert Colescott, Glenn Ligon, Kerry James Marshall, Mickalene Thomas, and Kehinde Wiley (whose recently commissioned presidential portrait of Barack Obama we are dying to see). “Haiti’s Revolution in Art: Jacob Lawrence Toussaint L’Ouverture Series” is a portfolio of stunningly powerful prints from the artist’s 41-panel exploration of the undersung leader of the 18th-century Haitian revolution, which drove out the French colonizers. Lawrence first learned of L’Ouverture while on a quest to discover new African-American heroes, which he felt the history books had done a subpar job of providing him in school.

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