The 25 weirdest attractions in San Antonio that are worth visiting

San Antonio has plenty of tourist attractions, from historic landmarks to museums — but the city has some surprisingly weird sights to see, too.

For those times when you want to check out something outside the norm, we rounded up the strangest attractions in San Antonio, including sites of urban legends, unique public artworks and pieces of the city's hidden history.

Whether you've lived here your whole life or are just visiting, these local attractions will give you a new look at the Alamo City.
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F.I.S.H
200 West Jones Ave.
Created by artist Donald Lipski, these models of long-eared sunfish hang under an overpass on the River Walk's Museum Reach near the San Antonio Museum of Art.
Photo via Instagram / jenhamiltontx
F.I.S.H
200 West Jones Ave.
Created by artist Donald Lipski, these models of long-eared sunfish hang under an overpass on the River Walk's Museum Reach near the San Antonio Museum of Art.
Hot Wells 
5503 S. Presa St., bexar.org
Back in the day, Hot Wells hot spring resort was a hotspot for some of the hippest celebs of the silent film era, including director Cecil B. DeMille and actors like Douglas Fairbanks Sr. and Sarah Bernhardt. Furthermore, the 1911 film The Immortal Alamo was partially shot across the river from the property at Star Film Ranch. The remains of the once-famous resort are now a park, where visitors can soak in the landmark's unique history.
Photo via Instagram / adm_xander
Hot Wells
5503 S. Presa St., bexar.org
Back in the day, Hot Wells hot spring resort was a hotspot for some of the hippest celebs of the silent film era, including director Cecil B. DeMille and actors like Douglas Fairbanks Sr. and Sarah Bernhardt. Furthermore, the 1911 film The Immortal Alamo was partially shot across the river from the property at Star Film Ranch. The remains of the once-famous resort are now a park, where visitors can soak in the landmark's unique history.
Castroville’s Horse-Drawn Hearse
Institute of Texan Cultures, 801 E. César E. Chávez Blvd., (210) 458-2300, texancultures.utsa.edu
One object in the Institute of Texan Cultures’ collection is rumored to be very haunted: Castroville’s Horse-Drawn Hearse. James Benavides, the institute’s senior communications specialist, shared a spooky story about the hearse with the Current in 2020: “So, one night, a guard was on duty, making his regular rounds. When he gets to the exhibit floor, he finds the hearse doors open,” Benavides said. “He thought some of the senior officers were playing a joke on him, so he closes the doors and goes about his business. Coming up on the end of his night shift, he’s making his last sweep of the exhibit floor and he finds the hearse doors open again. He laughs to himself, then realizes, he was the only person in the building. ... The doors don’t open easily; they take two hands to work a latch and pull open. But stories persist, that from time to time, the guards will find the hearse doors open.”
Photo courtesy of Institute of Texan Cultures
Castroville’s Horse-Drawn Hearse
Institute of Texan Cultures, 801 E. César E. Chávez Blvd., (210) 458-2300, texancultures.utsa.edu
One object in the Institute of Texan Cultures’ collection is rumored to be very haunted: Castroville’s Horse-Drawn Hearse. James Benavides, the institute’s senior communications specialist, shared a spooky story about the hearse with the Current in 2020: “So, one night, a guard was on duty, making his regular rounds. When he gets to the exhibit floor, he finds the hearse doors open,” Benavides said. “He thought some of the senior officers were playing a joke on him, so he closes the doors and goes about his business. Coming up on the end of his night shift, he’s making his last sweep of the exhibit floor and he finds the hearse doors open again. He laughs to himself, then realizes, he was the only person in the building. ... The doors don’t open easily; they take two hands to work a latch and pull open. But stories persist, that from time to time, the guards will find the hearse doors open.”
Golden Age
Phil Hardberger Park, 8400 NW Military Highway
Anne Wallace's Golden Age springs out of the ground at Phil Hardberger Park. The piece is made up of six wheels made from parts of side roll irrigators, which are used to manage and restore grasslands, with sparkling gold sequins that are meant to evoke the look of a prairie wildfire.
Photo via Instagram / schraderfotowerks
Golden Age
Phil Hardberger Park, 8400 NW Military Highway
Anne Wallace's Golden Age springs out of the ground at Phil Hardberger Park. The piece is made up of six wheels made from parts of side roll irrigators, which are used to manage and restore grasslands, with sparkling gold sequins that are meant to evoke the look of a prairie wildfire.
Mansplaining Statue
University of the Incarnate Word, 4301 Broadway
Though unintended by the artist, the statue Classmates on UIW’s campus struck a chord, as it accidentally immortalizes the unique frustration of being mansplained to. The statue can be found near the college’s music building.
Photo via Instagram / mkomar09
Mansplaining Statue
University of the Incarnate Word, 4301 Broadway
Though unintended by the artist, the statue Classmates on UIW’s campus struck a chord, as it accidentally immortalizes the unique frustration of being mansplained to. The statue can be found near the college’s music building.