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There's so much poop along the Texas Coast, swimming could make you sick, new report says 

click to enlarge According to a new report, 55 out of 61 Texas beaches tested by environmental regulators were potentially unsafe for swimming on at least one day. - COURTESY IMAGE / ENVIRONMENT TEXAS
  • Courtesy Image / Environment Texas
  • According to a new report, 55 out of 61 Texas beaches tested by environmental regulators were potentially unsafe for swimming on at least one day.
We hate to be the bearers of bad news, but if you're heading to the Texas Coast this weekend, there's a good chance you'll be swimming in doody.

In 2020, 55 out of 61 Texas beaches tested by environmental regulators were potentially unsafe for swimming on at least one day that year, according to Safe for Swimming?, an annual report issued by Environment Texas Research and Policy Center.



For its analysis, Environment Texas examined whether fecal indicator bacteria levels exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s most protective “Beach Action Value.” That level is associated with an estimated illness rate of 32 out of every 1,000 swimmers. 

And in case we need to spell it out for folks who slept through biology class, "fecal" means the bacteria found in the tests came from shit. Eww.

Cole Park Beach in Corpus Christi had bacteria levels above this safety threshold on 91% of days tested last year, according to the report. It also identified Ropes Park Beach, Surfside Beach, Sylvan Beach Park, Follet’s Island Beach, Corpus Christi, Quintana Beach, Sargent Beach, Jetty Park Beach and Nueces Bay Causeway Beach #3 as the other most unsafe beaches last year.

Environment Texas' report calls for infrastructure upgrades to prevent sewage overflows and prevent runoff pollution.

Last month, the U.S. House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee approved a proposal that would authorize funding to stop sewage overflows and set aside a portion of the money for green projects.

“Even as Texans are back to enjoying the fresh sea breeze and splash of waves at the beach, pollution is still plaguing too many of the places where we swim," Environment Texas Executive Director Luke Metzger said in a written statement. "Now is the time to fix our water infrastructure and stop the flow of pathogens to our beaches.”

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