January 31, 2019

Where to Hike In and Around San Antonio Before It Gets Unbearably Hot Outside

It's inevitable – it'll be 100+ degrees outside in a matter of months, maybe sooner. Quick, while there's still time, take a few hours to enjoy nature and hiking before it will to literally too hot to function.
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Crownridge Canyon Natural Area
7222 Luskey Blvd, (210) 207-5320, sanantonio.gov
What was once a dumping ground is now a beautiful San Antonio park with plaques scattered throughout to detail the importance of the park to nature and history. Not only that, but this park isn’t terribly far from La Cantera, so maybe ease yourself into the outdoors by shopping in an outdoor mall before venturing into nature.
Photo via Instagram / mjmlawsatx
Crownridge Canyon Natural Area
7222 Luskey Blvd, (210) 207-5320, sanantonio.gov
What was once a dumping ground is now a beautiful San Antonio park with plaques scattered throughout to detail the importance of the park to nature and history. Not only that, but this park isn’t terribly far from La Cantera, so maybe ease yourself into the outdoors by shopping in an outdoor mall before venturing into nature.
Photo via Instagram / mjmlawsatx
Lost Maples State Natural Area
37221 FM 187, (830) 966-3413, tpwd.texas.gov
You thought you had to visit the East Coast to see the seasons change color? Oh no baby, what is you doing? Honestly, though, you’ve gotta get there pretty early, because the park will reach full capacity pretty quickly after they open. Because it’s so beautiful. I mean, look at it.
Photo via Instagram / lostmaples
Lost Maples State Natural Area
37221 FM 187, (830) 966-3413, tpwd.texas.gov
You thought you had to visit the East Coast to see the seasons change color? Oh no baby, what is you doing? Honestly, though, you’ve gotta get there pretty early, because the park will reach full capacity pretty quickly after they open. Because it’s so beautiful. I mean, look at it.
Photo via Instagram / lostmaples
Hill Country State Natural Area
10600 Bandera Creek Rd, tpwd.texas.gov
You heard it here – you can bring your horse to this natural area. You can even camp like a cowboy, if you so desire, at one of their “primitive” (no running water) campsites. Spanning about 5,000 acres, Hill Country State Natural Area is more than just a place you can ride your horse, though. In fact, you can backpack down a canyon or up a plateau as well.
Photo via Instagram / hillcountrysna
Hill Country State Natural Area
10600 Bandera Creek Rd, tpwd.texas.gov
You heard it here – you can bring your horse to this natural area. You can even camp like a cowboy, if you so desire, at one of their “primitive” (no running water) campsites. Spanning about 5,000 acres, Hill Country State Natural Area is more than just a place you can ride your horse, though. In fact, you can backpack down a canyon or up a plateau as well.
Photo via Instagram / hillcountrysna
Pace Bend Park
2011 Pace Bend Rd N, (512) 264-1482, parks.traviscountytx.gov
Located on Lake Travis near the northwest side of Austin, Pace Bend Park boasts more than nine miles of prime shoreline location. Incredible views are included, of course, in the admission cost.
Photo via Instagram / katekrez
Pace Bend Park
2011 Pace Bend Rd N, (512) 264-1482, parks.traviscountytx.gov
Located on Lake Travis near the northwest side of Austin, Pace Bend Park boasts more than nine miles of prime shoreline location. Incredible views are included, of course, in the admission cost.
Photo via Instagram / katekrez
Government Canyon State Natural Area
12861 Galm Rd, (210) 688-9055, tpwd.texas.gov
With around 12,000 acres and 40 miles of hiking trails, Government Canyon State Natural Area is important to Texas for more than just being an outdoor refuge where you can feel separated from the hustle and bustle of San Antonio – this area remaining undeveloped is also important to the city’s drinking water. While you’re there, be sure to look for dinosaur tracks that are more than 100 million years old, or the Ziezelmann house, which was build in the 1800s, so while it isn’t quite as old, it’s still pretty darn old.
Photo via Instagram / governmentcanyon
Government Canyon State Natural Area
12861 Galm Rd, (210) 688-9055, tpwd.texas.gov
With around 12,000 acres and 40 miles of hiking trails, Government Canyon State Natural Area is important to Texas for more than just being an outdoor refuge where you can feel separated from the hustle and bustle of San Antonio – this area remaining undeveloped is also important to the city’s drinking water. While you’re there, be sure to look for dinosaur tracks that are more than 100 million years old, or the Ziezelmann house, which was build in the 1800s, so while it isn’t quite as old, it’s still pretty darn old.
Photo via Instagram / governmentcanyon
River Bend Park
118 River Bend Rd, (830) 249-9343, visitboerne.org
Also known as James Kiehl Park, River Bend Park is located in Kendall County, somewhere along IH-10 between Boerne and Kerrville. Birdwatchers from many surrounding counties call this park their preferred destination, and a wildlife census is held every month for documentation purposes. With three loops of varying difficulty and terrain, these trails are a can’t-miss for your bird-watching friends.
Photo via Instagram / treehouseemily
River Bend Park
118 River Bend Rd, (830) 249-9343, visitboerne.org
Also known as James Kiehl Park, River Bend Park is located in Kendall County, somewhere along IH-10 between Boerne and Kerrville. Birdwatchers from many surrounding counties call this park their preferred destination, and a wildlife census is held every month for documentation purposes. With three loops of varying difficulty and terrain, these trails are a can’t-miss for your bird-watching friends.
Photo via Instagram / treehouseemily
Barton Creek Greenbelt
3755 S Capital of Texas Hwy B, austinparks.org
This park would make a lovely stop during a day trip to Austin – especially since spring is coming and that’s when the water is known to run in Barton Creek. These trails are heavily trafficked and are also dog-friendly, so be prepared to socialize with other pet parents.
Photo via Instagram / johnnyscalise
Barton Creek Greenbelt
3755 S Capital of Texas Hwy B, austinparks.org
This park would make a lovely stop during a day trip to Austin – especially since spring is coming and that’s when the water is known to run in Barton Creek. These trails are heavily trafficked and are also dog-friendly, so be prepared to socialize with other pet parents.
Photo via Instagram / johnnyscalise
Medina River Natural Area
15890 TX-16, (210) 207-7275, sanantonio.gov
With campsites available for rental for $20 a night, that’s way cheaper than any hotel you’d want to stay at, and probably a lot more fun if you bring your friends. Or don’t – they say that being alone in nature is the best place to contemplate your existence and face your own mortality. Yikes, that got dark.
Photo via Instagram / mrssaenzrocks
Medina River Natural Area
15890 TX-16, (210) 207-7275, sanantonio.gov
With campsites available for rental for $20 a night, that’s way cheaper than any hotel you’d want to stay at, and probably a lot more fun if you bring your friends. Or don’t – they say that being alone in nature is the best place to contemplate your existence and face your own mortality. Yikes, that got dark.
Photo via Instagram / mrssaenzrocks
Friedrich Wilderness Park
21395 Milsa Dr, (210) 207-3781, sanantonio.gov
Protect this area at all costs! Friedrich Wilderness Park is not only home to two federally listed endangered songbird species and is nationally known for birdwatching opportunities, but they have wheelchair accessible hiking routes to boot. In all, this park has around ten miles of paved and unpaved paths over six hundred acres of raw wilderness.
Photo via Instagram / karlo.antonio33
Friedrich Wilderness Park
21395 Milsa Dr, (210) 207-3781, sanantonio.gov
Protect this area at all costs! Friedrich Wilderness Park is not only home to two federally listed endangered songbird species and is nationally known for birdwatching opportunities, but they have wheelchair accessible hiking routes to boot. In all, this park has around ten miles of paved and unpaved paths over six hundred acres of raw wilderness.
Photo via Instagram / karlo.antonio33
Comanche Lookout Park
15551 Nacogdoches Rd, (210) 207-7275, sanantonio.gov
Could this park be haunted? Some think so. With one of the highest points in Bexar County, the hill was a major landmark in the 1700s. Various tribes of Native Americans also used the grounds for hunting and warfare, so some say that you can hear drums and chanting at night. Also, can you believe that at 96 acres, Comanche Lookout Park is one of San Antonio’s smaller parks?
Photo via Instagram / summiteffects
Comanche Lookout Park
15551 Nacogdoches Rd, (210) 207-7275, sanantonio.gov
Could this park be haunted? Some think so. With one of the highest points in Bexar County, the hill was a major landmark in the 1700s. Various tribes of Native Americans also used the grounds for hunting and warfare, so some say that you can hear drums and chanting at night. Also, can you believe that at 96 acres, Comanche Lookout Park is one of San Antonio’s smaller parks?
Photo via Instagram / summiteffects