August 21, 2019

25 Essential Chinese Restaurants in San Antonio You Should've Tried By Now

Whether Chinese fare is your favorite cuisine or you like to indulge every once in a while, these restaurants hold it down with traditional (or at least traditional for American Chinese) dishes that will hit the spot.
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Kungfu Noodle
6733 Bandera Road, Leon Valley, (210) 451-5586, kungfunoodletx.com
The noodles, available in both stretched and thick ribbons, are hand-pulled by a pair of Chinese transplants, hailing from the Anhui province. While the flavors are plenty satisfying, lifting these noodles are half the fun dining her.
Photo via Instagram / s.a.foodie
Kungfu Noodle
6733 Bandera Road, Leon Valley, (210) 451-5586, kungfunoodletx.com
The noodles, available in both stretched and thick ribbons, are hand-pulled by a pair of Chinese transplants, hailing from the Anhui province. While the flavors are plenty satisfying, lifting these noodles are half the fun dining her.
Photo via Instagram / s.a.foodie
Sichuan House
3505 Wurzbach Road #102, (210) 509-9999
Sichuan House delivers regional favorites hailing from Sichuan, found in the southwest of China. Go for the handmade dumplings, smashed cucumber salad, tea-smoked duck, or eggplant. Remember to BYOB.
Photo via Instagram / susiethefoodie
Sichuan House
3505 Wurzbach Road #102, (210) 509-9999
Sichuan House delivers regional favorites hailing from Sichuan, found in the southwest of China. Go for the handmade dumplings, smashed cucumber salad, tea-smoked duck, or eggplant. Remember to BYOB.
Photo via Instagram / susiethefoodie
Golden Wok
Multiple locations, goldenwoksa.com
Despite having no cooking experience and not being Asian, Connie Andrews achieves her dream of opening a Chinese restaurant in 1972. The first Golden Wok opened that year, and a second four years later (though it closed). A decade later the well-known Wurzbach Road location opened. Today, the two-restaurant operation is known for its take on authentic Asian cuisine and dim sum.
Photo via Instagram / stine.eats
Golden Wok
Multiple locations, goldenwoksa.com
Despite having no cooking experience and not being Asian, Connie Andrews achieves her dream of opening a Chinese restaurant in 1972. The first Golden Wok opened that year, and a second four years later (though it closed). A decade later the well-known Wurzbach Road location opened. Today, the two-restaurant operation is known for its take on authentic Asian cuisine and dim sum.
Photo via Instagram / stine.eats
Sichuan Garden
2347 NW Military Hwy, (210) 265-5750, eatsichuan.net
The OG Sichuan spot in SA is still going strong. Try the challenging sliced pig’s ear or duck tongues with jalapeño before retreating to the likes of the (also very good) stir-fried lamb with cumin.
Photo via Instagram / j.a.flora
Sichuan Garden
2347 NW Military Hwy, (210) 265-5750, eatsichuan.net
The OG Sichuan spot in SA is still going strong. Try the challenging sliced pig’s ear or duck tongues with jalapeño before retreating to the likes of the (also very good) stir-fried lamb with cumin.
Photo via Instagram / j.a.flora
April’s Chinese
2030 S Alamo St, (210) 223-7335, aprilschineserestaurant.com
While Southtown may be filled with plenty of trendy restaurants, it’s also home to one no-frills Chinese restaurant. Visible from the highway, this Alamo Street outpost has a solid variety of American-Chinese standards such as orange chicken and kung pao chicken. The space may be small, but the flavors more than make up for that.
Photo via Instagram / lonestarfoodie
April’s Chinese
2030 S Alamo St, (210) 223-7335, aprilschineserestaurant.com
While Southtown may be filled with plenty of trendy restaurants, it’s also home to one no-frills Chinese restaurant. Visible from the highway, this Alamo Street outpost has a solid variety of American-Chinese standards such as orange chicken and kung pao chicken. The space may be small, but the flavors more than make up for that.
Photo via Instagram / lonestarfoodie
Tang Street
16111 San Pedro Ave, (210) 490-1788, tangst.com
This outpost serves unique northeastern Chinese fare, executed simply but exceptionally. Adventurous diners should look out for sauerkraut braised pork intestine and a cucumber needle mushroom dish.
Photo via Instagram / sanantoniolovelist
Tang Street
16111 San Pedro Ave, (210) 490-1788, tangst.com
This outpost serves unique northeastern Chinese fare, executed simply but exceptionally. Adventurous diners should look out for sauerkraut braised pork intestine and a cucumber needle mushroom dish.
Photo via Instagram / sanantoniolovelist
Formosa Garden
1011 NE Interstate 410 Loop, (210) 828-9988, formosagardensa.com
Get it delivered or dine in, either way you’ll be eating good here. The restaurant offers all the traditional Chinese fare you expect at such joints, as well as hibachi-style meats, sushi and seafood. If you’d like, you can even grab a seat at the bar and enjoy a glass of Asian wine, sake or a beer with your meal.
Photo via Instagram / sanantoniomunchies
Formosa Garden
1011 NE Interstate 410 Loop, (210) 828-9988, formosagardensa.com
Get it delivered or dine in, either way you’ll be eating good here. The restaurant offers all the traditional Chinese fare you expect at such joints, as well as hibachi-style meats, sushi and seafood. If you’d like, you can even grab a seat at the bar and enjoy a glass of Asian wine, sake or a beer with your meal.
Photo via Instagram / sanantoniomunchies
Ming’s Noodle Bar
5253 McCullough Ave, (210) 564-9349, mingsthing.com
Along with sister restaurant Ming’s Thing, this noodle bar keeps patrons happy with its eclectic mix of noodle bowls. Each bowl is jam-packed with eclectic flavors, ensuring that there’s something for everyone. Brought to you by Chef Ming Qian, you’ll also be able to find other tasty dishes like the Asian chicken fajita steamed bun.
Photo via Instagram / eat_it_b
Ming’s Noodle Bar
5253 McCullough Ave, (210) 564-9349, mingsthing.com
Along with sister restaurant Ming’s Thing, this noodle bar keeps patrons happy with its eclectic mix of noodle bowls. Each bowl is jam-packed with eclectic flavors, ensuring that there’s something for everyone. Brought to you by Chef Ming Qian, you’ll also be able to find other tasty dishes like the Asian chicken fajita steamed bun.
Photo via Instagram / eat_it_b
Lucky Noodle
8525 Blanco Road, (210) 267-9717
When compared to its predecessor off Bandera Road, Lucky Noodle features more than 1,500 square feet of seating and an open kitchen area — so you can watch the noodles being pulled and stretched. Consider it dinner and a show.
Photo via Instagram / eatswithtrang
Lucky Noodle
8525 Blanco Road, (210) 267-9717
When compared to its predecessor off Bandera Road, Lucky Noodle features more than 1,500 square feet of seating and an open kitchen area — so you can watch the noodles being pulled and stretched. Consider it dinner and a show.
Photo via Instagram / eatswithtrang
Ding How Restaurant
4531 Northwest Loop 410, (210) 340-7944, dinghowsa.com
Recognizable as the restaurant on stilts, Ding How has been a San Antonio institution since 1983. Complete with traditional decor, the restaurant is dependable with its lunch specials and menu full of Chinese classics like sesame chicken and Mongolian beef.
Photo via Instagram / sprinkleoftexas
Ding How Restaurant
4531 Northwest Loop 410, (210) 340-7944, dinghowsa.com
Recognizable as the restaurant on stilts, Ding How has been a San Antonio institution since 1983. Complete with traditional decor, the restaurant is dependable with its lunch specials and menu full of Chinese classics like sesame chicken and Mongolian beef.
Photo via Instagram / sprinkleoftexas