August 30, 2019 Slideshows » News

10 Non-Profits in San Antonio Working to Change Texas 

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Trump's presidency has been characterized by critics as an administration that encourages hate, violence and retaliation from white supremacist groups against people of color and the LGBTQ+ community. However, there is a "silver lining" in San Antonio: in a state-wide movement to combat this hate, many non-profit advocacy groups have been galvanized into action. Here is a list of the top 10 non-profit organizations in San Antonio that are working to transform Texas with progressive change. 
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Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center
723 S. Brazos St., (210) 271-3151, guadalupeculturalarts.org
Located in the heart of San Antonio’s Westside, the Guadalupe is one of the largest community-based, multidisciplinary organizations in the U.S. Founded in 1980 by a group of Chicano/Chicana artists, the GCAC cultivates, promotes and preserves Chicano, Latino and Native American arts and culture. This non-profit was one of the first Chicano organizations to collaborate with Mexican artists and pioneer in cultural education. Today, it provides a platform for San Antonio artists from every discipline to share their work with the community.
Photo via Instagram / guadalupeculturalarts
Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Fund
110 Broadway, Ste. 300, (210) 224-5476, maldef.org.
Founded in San Antonio in 1968, MALDEF is a civil rights organization that is committed to defending the rights of all Latinos living in the United States. This organization’s work supports the fair treatment of Latinos in the classroom, workplace and courtroom. MALDEF also fights for immigrant and voting rights, so underrepresented communities may have equal access to justice no matter what their citizenship status is.
Photo via Instagram / maldefian
National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures
1208 Buena Vista St., (210) 432-3982, nalac.org.
Since 1989, the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures has been providing a platform for many Latino artists to present their work in San Antonio. This organization delivers programs that stabilize and revitalize the US Latino arts and cultural sector through funding, leadership training, research and advocacy. NALAC envisions a cultural landscape that fully values the contributions of an expanding Latino arts field and its dynamic workforce.
Photo via Gabriel Garcia Roman
Esperanza Center
922 San Pedro Avenue, (210) 228-0201, esperanzacenter.org.
The Esperanza is an intersectional support center for LGBTQ+ and minority groups, seeking to empower the community towards progressive change. The center was founded in 1987 by a group made up of mostly Chicana activists aiming to bring together movements for peace and justice in San Antonio. During its early years, the Esperanza was actively engaged in demonstrations against white supremacist groups, such as the KKK. This non-profit also spearheaded mural projects that engaged children as artists, and was the first art exhibit in Texas to focus on the Queer community by bringing attention to the AIDS crisis. Esperanza continues to be a politically progressive, outspoken, and unwavering force for justice in San Antonio and beyond.
Photo via Instagram / esperanzacenter
SAY Sí
1518 S Alamo St., (210) 212-8666, saysi.org.
SAY Sí ignites the creative power of young people as forces of positive change. This organization values artists, empowers marginalized communities, and advances culture through involvement within the San Antonio community. Say Sí’s vision is for all young people to have equitable access to opportunities that empower them in becoming active contributors to their communities.
Photo via Instagram / saysi_sa
Green Spaces Alliance of South Texas
108 E Mistletoe Ave., (210) 222-8430, greensatx.org.
San Antonio is one of the fastest growing cities in the United States, with its regional population growth projected to almost double in the next 50 years. Urban growth, without careful planning and preservation, may disrupt the quality of life for many residents in San Antonio. By protecting undeveloped land and water resources, cultivating urban green spaces, and educating the next generation about the environment, the Green Spaces Alliance is ensuring a better quality of life for San Antonians in the years to come.
Photo via Instagram / greenspacesalliance
1023 N Pine St, Bldg. 6, info@movetexas.org, movetexas.org.
“Mobilize. Organize. Vote. Empower.” MOVE Texas is a nonpartisan, nonprofit, grassroots organization building power in underrepresented youth communities through civic education, leadership development, and issue advocacy. This organization works hard to build a great future and empower great new leaders.
Photo via Instagram / move_texas
Jolt Texas
1 UTSA Circle, info@jolttx.org, jolttx.org.
Jolt is a Latino-lead movement across Texas that harnesses the power of community advocacy. They are dedicated to the belief that democracy is stronger when underrepresented voices are heard and respected. By encouraging voter engagement, educating strong community leaders, and supporting the arts, Jolt is taking the front-seat in transforming Texas.
Photo via jolttx.org
Texas Organizing Project
700 S. Zarzamora Dr., (210) 900-2901, info@organizetexas.org.
Texas is a big and diverse state, and the need for community organization has never been more important than it is now. With the state’s evolving social makeup, there is a widespread need for improvement in areas of health care, poverty and education. TOP is a non-profit that empowers Black and Latino communities with the goal of transforming Texas into a state where working people of color have the power and representation they deserve.
Photo via Instagram / texas_organizing-project
Intercultural Development Research Association
5815 Callaghan Rd. Ste. 101, (210) 444-1710, idra.org.
Throughout its history, IDRA has always been a vocal advocate for students by supporting their right to an education. This organization’s mission is to achieve equal opportunity for every child by encouraging strong public school systems and defending unbiased access to educational resources. IDRA also helps strengthen and transform public education by uplifting students from underrepresented populations through research and community involvement.
Photo via idra.org
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Guadalupe Cultural Arts Center
723 S. Brazos St., (210) 271-3151, guadalupeculturalarts.org
Located in the heart of San Antonio’s Westside, the Guadalupe is one of the largest community-based, multidisciplinary organizations in the U.S. Founded in 1980 by a group of Chicano/Chicana artists, the GCAC cultivates, promotes and preserves Chicano, Latino and Native American arts and culture. This non-profit was one of the first Chicano organizations to collaborate with Mexican artists and pioneer in cultural education. Today, it provides a platform for San Antonio artists from every discipline to share their work with the community.
Photo via Instagram / guadalupeculturalarts

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